“are you a leader like a leader”

“I think the best leaders communicate often and are transparent (which is rare).  The best leaders also customize communications to best suit the situation and the recipient,” Brownlee said. “This means they take the time to figure out which communication mode is preferred by each team member (e.g. are they a text person, email, phone, or face to face?)  They’re also great listeners and are authentically interested in other people.”
You can not handle bad people. You need to focus on what you want and walk away from them. You can also talk to them and let them know that you are there, but your success comes before anything. Just remember that and just stay focused.
After all, how often have you talked to a friend about working out, saving money, or studying for school and heard them say something like, “Yeah, I know I really should be doing that but…” followed by some lame-brained excuse as to why they’re putting off their self-development?
To make his case, Brown sorts successful leaders into two categories. “Redefining” leaders radically change the political landscape, not by “[seeking] centre ground” but by “[moving] the centre in their direction.” Brown puts Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson in this category, because several of their signature achievements—FDR’s New Deal, and LBJ’s War on Poverty and dedication to civil rights—have had a major and lasting impact on American society. We tend to think of these men as strong leaders, and in many ways we’re right. But Brown shows a different side of the story: because of the checks and balances of the American political system, neither FDR nor LBJ had the ability to govern by fiat. Their strength lay in their power to persuade—to convince their colleagues in government, and the American people, to understand and support their point of view.
Task-oriented leaders are typically less concerned with the idea of catering to group members, and more concerned with acquiring a certain solution to meet a production goal. For this reason, they typically are able to make sure that deadlines are met, yet their group members’ well-being may suffer. Relationship-oriented leaders are focused on developing the team and the relationships in it. The positives to having this kind of environment are that team members are more motivated and have support. However, the emphasis on relations as opposed to getting a job done might make productivity suffer.
Unsure what your tendencies are? Take a quiz! There are many leadership-style quizzes online, but one of my favorites is on Skillsyouneed.com. This test will determine your leadership personality, and it will also identify how you can improve your abilities and build on your specific strengths.
Men don’t become highly successful by accident. While the concept of how “successful” a man is remains a matter of personal judgment, regardless of a man’s wealth or fame, there are undeniable habits and traits a man has to have to help him achieve success and to maximize his true potential.
Jump up ^ Zaccaro, S. J., Gulick, L. M. V. & Khare, V. P. (2008). “Personality and leadership”. In C. J. Hoyt, G. R. Goethals & D. R. Forsyth (Eds.), Leadership at the crossroads (Vol 1) (pp. 13–29). Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.
Leaders have the ability to anticipate trends, well in advance of their competitors. They continually ask, “Based on what is happening today, where is the market going? Where is it likely to be in three months, six months, one year, and two years?” They do this through thoughtful strategic planning.
When making friends with someone, ask yourself if the person makes you feel motivated, positive, and confident, or if they make you feel tired, overwhelmed, or incompetent. Choose to spend time with the positive people, not the ones sucking your energy.
While this task might sound daunting to many people, it is actually quite simple once you can specifically identify the leader’s particular weakness. Because it’s “qualities” that we discuss when talking about good leaders, the best measure would be to use psychometric testing.
Sharp perception: Do you know how people really perceive you? Effective leaders do. They have an easy level of honest communication with their teams and their peers, and a thorough understanding of how they are perceived. Testing others’ perception of you can be as simple as observing their behavior. Are your co-workers and team members relaxed around you? Does all conversation stop when you enter the room? 
Finally, accept that we all make mistakes. Nobody is perfect. When you do, try to learn the lessons, but don’t be destabilised. Someone told me once: “don’t chew the cud”. Keep moving forward, be resilient, remember that things will get better. And smile.
Non-profit Ushahidi has helped seed the fast-growing East African tech industry and reimagined what technology can do. Witness its crowdsourced mapping platform, which helps communities track everything from violence to floods.
First and foremost, great leaders care about their team’s development and with good reason! 65% of employees cite ‘training and development opportunities’ as one of their top three work motivators. Strong leaders tap into employees’ desire to learn by providing constant access to the right training that meets their personal and company needs. Creating a strong learning culture across your teams doesn’t only improve employees capabilities, it increases team motivation and engagement with the business mission.
“A leader needs to communicate in a way that makes people feel they need to do. As a leader of a large group you have to keep in mind that people need to believe in you and know that you’re behind any given message. It’s not only what you say but truly what you feel and believe. This rule reminds all of us, and leaders in particular, that emotions are a powerful motivator — or, in some cases, a de-motivator. We’re social creatures who need interaction, and you use that to make points when they’re important enough. When you deliver a message face-to-face, it’s strikingly different than when you do some kind of mass communication. If we’re going to have impact as leaders, we have a responsibility to communicate directly, eyeball-to-eyeball, and with authenticity.”
Leaders who rely on fear and power and intimidation aren’t so much leaders as bullies. True leaders are always nurturing and mentoring others on the team, which means letting them take the wheel sometimes. When you allow others to take the lead, you give them a chance to showcase their skills and talent, and you inspire your whole team to bring their best.
Thoughts influence feelings and feelings determine how you view your work. You have a lot of thoughts in your head, and you always have a choice of which ones to focus on: the ones that will make you emotionally stuck (fears, doubts) or the ones that will move you forward (excitement, experimenting, trying new things, stepping out of your comfort zone).
Control. At the beginning of a team’s life or your tenure as the team leader, when you do not yet have the insight into the team’s capabilities, the right approach is to exert authority and control. It is far easier to start tight and loosen control as needed.
This is called disproportionate impact — and it’s not simple. Most people have an ordinary impact in the world. They lead ordinary jobs, spend and save ordinary amounts of money, and when they work they affect an ordinary number of people.
In response to the early criticisms of the trait approach, theorists began to research leadership as a set of behaviors, evaluating the behavior of successful leaders, determining a behavior taxonomy, and identifying broad leadership styles.[31] David McClelland, for example, posited that leadership takes a strong personality with a well-developed positive ego. To lead, self-confidence and high self-esteem are useful, perhaps even essential.[32]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *