“become a great leader successful leaders”

Autocratic leaders do not entertain any suggestions or initiatives from subordinates. The autocratic management has been successful as it provides strong motivation to the manager. It permits quick decision-making, as only one person decides for the whole group and keeps each decision to him/herself until he/she feels it needs to be shared with the rest of the group.[87]
The relationship between assertiveness and leadership emergence is curvilinear; individuals who are either low in assertiveness or very high in assertiveness are less likely to be identified as leaders.[72]
None of the old theories successfully address the challenge of developing “leadership presence”; that certain “something” in leaders that commands attention, inspires people, wins their trust and makes followers want to work with them.
Charisma. People usually perceive leaders as larger than life. Charisma plays a large part in this perception. Leaders who have charisma are able to arouse strong emotions in their employees by defining a vision which unites and captivates them. Using this vision, leaders motivate employees to reach toward a future goal by tying the goal to substantial personal rewards and values.
If you’re working on a project, your goals and expectations should be clear from the beginning. Then your employees will be more motivated and not confused. It is preferable to have your goals down in written form.
Such heroic leaders are unlikely to emerge in normal times. But these are not normal times. On the contrary, today’s unprecedented inequality in many parts of the world is precisely the kind of injustice that could spur the emergence of great leaders with compassion for those at the bottom. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the young leader who most radiates hope today, was elected partly because of his commitment to helping ordinary people.
This is the essence of Angela Duckworth’s groundbreaking book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. In short, it is not the individual with the greatest starting position or motivation that usually wins — it’s the person who has the most “grit.” The person who can last the longest.
Psychology Today agrees: The best estimates offered by research are that leadership is about one-third born and two-thirds made, although having inborn qualities such as being assertive, extroverted, empathic and having the degree of social intelligence that allows a person to accurately size up social situations and understand social processes does make it easier to learn how to be a good leader.
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It means that you are willing to admit you could be wrong, that you recognize you may not have all the answers. And it means that you give credit where credit is due – – which many people struggle to do.
In exhibiting leadership, there are essentially three things you must accomplish if you hope to make the company a success. These three things don’t represent every facet of leadership, but they do form the foundation on which leadership is built and are an integral part of leadership at every level.
Although research has indicated that group members’ dependence on group leaders can lead to reduced self-reliance and overall group strength,[108] most people actually prefer to be led than to be without a leader (Berkowitz, 1953).[118] This “need for a leader” becomes especially strong in troubled groups that are experiencing some sort of conflict. Group members tend to be more contented and productive when they have a leader to guide them. Although individuals filling leadership roles can be a direct source of resentment for followers, most people appreciate the contributions that leaders make to their groups and consequently welcome the guidance of a leader (Stewart & Manz, 1995).[119]
High energy. Long hours and some travel are usually a prerequisite for leadership positions, especially as your company grows. Remaining alert and staying focused are two of the greatest obstacles you will have to face as a leader.
According to the latest psychological research, your willpower is like a muscle. The more you use it, the more tired it gets. Essentially, willpower is a finite resource that becomes depleted with use.
The leader must be at the forefront to lead and guide their team throughout the whole process until the goal is reached. But besides being that “torchbearer”, leaders also know when to step back and make their team take the initiative. In this way, the team gets the chance to develop, both personally and professionally. Pure management focuses on the tasks, real leadership focuses on the people.
The path-goal theory of leadership was developed by Robert House (1971) and was based on the expectancy theory of Victor Vroom.[48] According to House, the essence of the theory is “the meta proposition that leaders, to be effective, engage in behaviors that complement subordinates’ environments and abilities in a manner that compensates for deficiencies and is instrumental to subordinate satisfaction and individual and work unit performance”.[49] The theory identifies four leader behaviors, achievement-oriented, directive, participative, and supportive, that are contingent to the environment factors and follower characteristics. In contrast to the Fiedler contingency model, the path-goal model states that the four leadership behaviors are fluid, and that leaders can adopt any of the four depending on what the situation demands. The path-goal model can be classified both as a contingency theory, as it depends on the circumstances, and as a transactional leadership theory, as the theory emphasizes the reciprocity behavior between the leader and the followers.
A particular danger in these situations is that people or organizations that are being managed by such an individual or group think they’re being led; but they’re not. There may actually be no leadership at all, with no one setting a vision and no one being inspired. This can cause serious problems in the long term.
I often try to get things done and I am passionate about most of the things I do and the people involved. What are the best ways I can build on these qualities to become, a drum major or team captain?
“It’s fascinating how differently the same business can perform with two different leaders. We look first for intellectual honesty. It drives me crazy when you meet with management and there are real issues and they act like they aren’t there. Also important is a contrarian bent, a confidence to go against the prevailing trend. You generally don’t want people who are saying this is what we should do because this is what others are doing. You want people who are spending when others are not, and taking chips off the table when everybody else is putting them on.”
Although Steve Jobs is known for focusing in on the smallest of details, he knew how to delegate. By finding, cultivating, and trusting capable team members – like Tim Cook – Jobs was able to make Apple run smoothly, even while he had to be absent for extended periods of time.
In 1963, King organized the massive March on Washington, where he made his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. The passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 is noted as one of the many reasons Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize that same year. Dr. King used his transformational leadership skills to continue inspiring African-Americans and their allies to fight for civil rights using nonviolence means until his assassination in 1968.
The aim of LEADER is to increase support to local rural community and business networks to build knowledge and skills, and encourage innovation and cooperation in order to tackle local development objectives.
A good leader is strategic with their thinking, they understand what result business is trying to achieve and how the business to achieve these results. They will ensure all of their decisions and actions are consistent with the vision.
Cecil Rhodes (1853–1902) believed that public-spirited leadership could be nurtured by identifying young people with “moral force of character and instincts to lead”, and educating them in contexts (such as the collegiate environment of the University of Oxford) which further developed such characteristics. International networks of such leaders could help to promote international understanding and help “render war impossible”. This vision of leadership underlay the creation of the Rhodes Scholarships, which have helped to shape notions of leadership since their creation in 1903.[13]
I would say his/her humility.  True leaders recognize they’re nobody special; they’re just like everybody else. Therefore, they treat people like they would be treated; no being high and mighty.  They also like to roll up their sleeves and put work in like another laborer.  Isn’t it true that in wartime , the soldiers will listen to the officers with wartime experience much more than the officers out of West Point, Annapolis, and the other military academies?                         
The only way that you can learn is from mistakes, but don’t make of mistakes yourself, this will take you years to learn. Instead learn from other’s mistakes, read books of successful people and learn their mistakes and don’t do what they did wrong.
Trust other people to do their job. It’s hard to be successful if you don’t trust the people around you. You’re constantly micro-managing everything, leaving yourself spread thin and the others miffed about you not giving them a chance. Being successful is partly about assembling an able team around you. If you can’t trust others enough to let them do their job, you probably won’t succeed at that.

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