“becoming of you what being a leader means”

Rather than comparing yourself with people who are “better off” than you, think about all of the people who are homeless, chronically ill, or living in poverty. This will help you appreciate what you have rather than feeling sorry for yourself. Try engaging in volunteer work to help make this more apparent. This can help to boost your happiness and confidence as well.
Over the years the philosophical terminology of “management” and “leadership” have, in the organizational context, been used both as synonyms and with clearly differentiated meanings. Debate is fairly common about whether the use of these terms should be restricted, and generally reflects an awareness of the distinction made by Burns (1978) between “transactional” leadership (characterized by e.g. emphasis on procedures, contingent reward, management by exception) and “transformational” leadership (characterized by e.g. charisma, personal relationships, creativity).[58]
A leader was once seen as someone who presided from on high, dispensing wisdom, reward and discipline. The historic view of a leader was of someone in command and control took a strong role in issuing directives and enforcing their execution while remaining at a distance from the daily work.
The fifth and final characteristic of a successful leader is being responsible. A business owner has to realize that, as the saying goes, “A skunk stinks from the head down,” and a business does too. This means when there is blame to be accepted, the owner must be the first one to accept it. But it also means that when accolades are appropriate, they should be spread out among the employees. And when this happens, a leader is born.
Executives are energetic, outgoing, and competitive. They can be visionary, hard-working, and decisive. However, managers need to be aware of unsuccessful executives who once showed management potential but who are later dismissed or retired early. They typically fail because of personality factors rather than job performances.[126]
Hadley Cantril (1958) “Effective democratic leadership: a psychological interpretation”, Journal of Individual Psychology 14: 128–38, and pages 139–49 in Psychology, Humanism and Scientific Inquiry (1988) edited by Albert H. Cantril, Transaction Books.
When employees are given the opportunity to exercise ownership over their work, and use their brains to make decisions on their own, their competency and confidence increase. In turn, leaders empower their people to become leaders themselves. In highly effective organizations, there are leaders at every level, not just at the top. The solution is always to push authority down so you’re creating a leader-leader culture, not a leader-follower culture.
A good leader sets the bar high for their people, because they want to reach the goals and make the best of their teams. Only a demanding leader will achieve great results. In addition to this thoroughness, the leader must know how to listen, in order to know the needs of the people, and then provide the necessary time and resources for them to do their job properly, and therefore meet what is demanded of them.
Sandra Larson, previous executive director of MAP for Nonprofits, was once asked to write her thoughts on what makes an effective leader. Her thoughts are shared here to gel other leaders to articulate their own thoughts on what makes them a good leader.
There are many definitions of leadership. The Collins English dictionary defines leadership as “the leader(s) of a party or group.” Yet true leadership is much more than that. A leader can be the CEO of an organization or a first year employee who leads his or her team to success behind the scenes. A leader might lead through official authority and power. Yet, just as often great leaders lead through inspiration, persuasion and personal connections.
“Research clearly shows that transformational leaders—leaders who are positive, inspiring, and who empower and develop followers—are better leaders,” explains psychologist and leadership expert Ronald E. Riggio. “They are more valued by followers and have higher performing teams.”
Have good manners. An individual should always show respect to other people and distinguish oneself as a lady or gentleman. As a famous Jamaican proverb goes, “Manners carry you through the world and back without a penny.”

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