“being a good employee all the leader you can be”

^ Jump up to: a b Mumford, M. D.; Zaccaro, S. J.; Harding, F. D.; Jacobs, T. O.; Fleishman, E. A. (2000). “Leadership skills for a changing world solving complex social problems”. The Leadership Quarterly. 11: 11–35. doi:10.1016/s1048-9843(99)00041-7.

Dave Kerpen is the New York Times bestselling author of two books, Likeable Social Media and Likeable Business. If you like this post, please share it and please click the FOLLOW button above or below for more great posts from Dave.

How often have you heard the comment, “He or she is a born leader?” There are certain characteristics found in some people that seem to naturally put them in a position where they’re looked up to as a leader.

Ability to Motivate. Leaders don’t lead by telling people what they have to do. Instead, leaders cause people to want to help them. A key part of this is cultivating your own desire to help others. When others sense that you want to help them, they in turn want to help you.

To be a leader, you don’t have to be an elected official or a CEO. A leader is someone whom others consistently want to follow for new trends and ideas. A fancy title can make that happen temporarily, but a true leader inspires steadfast loyalty through the steps below!

The “what makes a good leader team” have developed the term “Employee Service” to provide the required context for leaders. What makes a good leader? ….. A good leader is someone who is committed to providing their employees with the service that their people deserve.

Before you appoint a leader, or go out looking for one, make sure you have a clear understanding of what it is you want them to achieve. Make sure they have the qualities and characteristics of a good leader, and whether or not they are a good fit with the team they will be leading.

Assertiveness is not the same as aggressiveness. Rather, it is the ability to clearly state what one expects so that there will be no misunderstandings. A leader must be assertive to get the desired results. Along with assertiveness comes the responsibility to clearly understand what followers expect from their leader.

Taking leadership action based on external sources suggests that in order to get people to follow you, you must get them to like and approve of you. But the reality is that people tend follow leaders who are true to what they believe in and act consistently on their beliefs, even when their actions may not be popular. These are the resilient, courageous leaders.

Jump up ^ Benjamin Jowett’s translation of Plato’s Republic does not use the word “leadership”; Plato discusses primarily a “guardian” class. See Plato (1892). The Dialogues of Plato translated into English with Analyses and Introductions by B. Jowett, M.A. 3. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2014-09-12.

What most people do: Say they’re going to start training by running 3 miles, 4 days a week. They accomplish their goal for the first week or two but soon life gets in the way. Then they run “whenever they get a chance.”

Invulnerability fallacy: Believing they can get away with doing what they want because they are too clever to get caught; even if they are caught, believing they will go unpunished because of their importance.

Personal Story: The first job I ever had was taking foreign exchange students to California attractions like Disneyland and the beach. Awesome right?! Well my manager was a huge jerk, which made an otherwise perfect summer job completely miserable. Even though I was only 16, it wasn’t difficult for me to see why his turnover rate was so high. I bet you can guess why I quit too.

Individuals who take on leadership roles in turbulent situations, such as groups facing a threat or ones in which status is determined by intense competition among rivals within the group, tend to be narcissistic: arrogant, self-absorbed, hostile, and very self-confident.[81]

Different situations call for different leadership styles. In an emergency when there is little time to converge on an agreement and where a designated authority has significantly more experience or expertise than the rest of the team, an autocratic leadership style may be most effective; however, in a highly motivated and aligned team with a homogeneous level of expertise, a more democratic or Laissez-faire style may be more effective. The style adopted should be the one that most effectively achieves the objectives of the group while balancing the interests of its individual members.[87] A field in which leadership style has gained strong attention is that of military science, recently expressing a holistic and integrated view of leadership, including how a leader’s physical presence determines how others perceive that leader. The factors of physical presence are military bearing, physical fitness, confidence, and resilience. The leader’s intellectual capacity helps to conceptualize solutions and acquire knowledge to do the job. A leader’s conceptual abilities apply agility, judgment, innovation, interpersonal tact, and domain knowledge. Domain knowledge for leaders encompasses tactical and technical knowledge as well as cultural and geopolitical awareness.[88]

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