“best way to be successful the perfect leader”

As previously stated, leadership involves creating and articulating a vision and inspiring others to want to work toward that vision. But leaders may not be skilled at or involved with the day-to-day management of the work needed to turn that vision into a reality.
According to some, leadership is determined by distinctive dispositional characteristics present at birth (e.g., extraversion; intelligence; ingenuity). However, according to Forsyth (2009) there is evidence to show that leadership also develops through hard work and careful observation.[108] Thus, effective leadership can result from nature (i.e., innate talents) as well as nurture (i.e., acquired skills).
Externally, it means knowing the organization’s customers (from every  conceivable angle); having a feel for existing and potential markets;  knowing what competitors (and potential competitors) are doing and  planning; staying in touch with industry trends; and monitoring the  environment in general, (which these days is global for just about  everybody), for broader opportunities and threats.
Another crucial element of great leadership is “brain” that is synonymous with intellect or “canniness.” It is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff, and “make smart decisions in a complex and rapidly changing world.”
Admit your mistakes. You aren’t perfect, and occasionally showing that you could have planned something differently will show that you are only human and will make people respect you more. Of course, you can avoid always admitting that you’ve made a mistake, because you want to look like you know what the heck you’re doing.
“[If you are] controlling people to do certain things in certain ways, you’re not going to get the level of engagement that you’re looking for,” Iorio said. “Coaching is about helping the people you lead recognize the choices they have in front of them. People will [then] take a great deal of ownership over the direction of the project.” 
This charisma can be difficult to learn, it usually requires most people to go outside of their comfort zone by speaking with more strangers as well as learning how to command the attention and speak to a group of any size.
Yet for so many organizations, this is the prevailing leadership style, stifling the work atmosphere and causing unnecessary fear and stress among people. But the reality is, a “driven” leader is the complete opposite of what a true leader is or does.
A friend of mine is an orthopedic surgeon, and one day we were talking about our careers and he said, “You know, Ramit, all these residents want to be me. They want to be where I am — but they can’t be me without going through the same fire I’ve gone through — making the mistakes, staying the late hours. They all want to see the result.”
It’s safe to say that all great leaders will have to enter unchartered waters at some point during their career (figuratively, of course). Because of this, they have to be able to trust their intuition and draw on past experiences to guide them.
Some people can develop leadership skills through their everyday experiences. Moreover, some people do not hold any positions of authority or business titles, yet still demonstrate leadership through their actions and abilities to rally people to act on their visions for something better than the status quo.
Use newsletters, your company intranet and team meetings to help spread the word. And, whenever there’s a change – good, bad or ugly – update your employees and tell them why it’s happening. And, expect the same from your direct reports.
But to read Archie Brown’s fascinating book, The Myth of the Strong Leader, is to see an illustration that leaders like Suárez, who served as prime minister of Spain from 1976 to 1981, possess leadership styles and capacities that are incredibly effective, and depressingly rare.
He apparently believed in being brutally honest with others and that their feelings were irrelevant. He did not conduct formal reviews with employees and was very sparing with praise for a job well done.
Jump up ^ Zaccaro, S. J.; & Banks, D. J. (2001). “Leadership, vision, and organizational effectiveness”. In S. J. Zaccaro and R. J. Klimoski (Editors), The Nature of Organizational Leadership: Understanding the Performance Imperatives Confronting Today’s Leaders. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Social boldness. Leaders tend to be spontaneous risk-takers. They are usually socially aggressive and generally thick-skinned. Overall, they are responsive to others and tend to be high in emotional stamina.
Of course as well as being able to create a compelling vision, they must also be able to communicate it effectively to their followers, which is partly why communication skills are also vital to leaders.
We do some things without even thinking about how harmful they are, sometimes in the morning when we don’t have time to spare. Every morning do you have cereal or drink a cup of coffee with milk for breakfast? In this articles we talk about eight things many of us do every morning that are actuall…
Concepts such as autogestion, employeeship, and common civic virtue, etc., challenge the fundamentally anti-democratic nature of the leadership principle by stressing individual responsibility and/or group authority in the workplace and elsewhere and by focusing on the skills and attitudes that a person needs in general rather than separating out “leadership” as the basis of a special class of individuals.
Know your three forward. You do not need more. Fill out your weekly calendar, noting when you will do what and how. When-what-how is important to schedule. Review how each day went by what you learned and revise what you could improve.

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