“and provide guidance in doing a task what it means to be a good leader”

There needs to be a distinction here between dressing to impress and dressing to influence. You don’t necessarily want to dress to impress — impressing may not be appropriate for the scenario you’re in (if you are delivering pizzas, don’t wear a suit, for example). You simply want to influence people’s perceptions of you. What image do you want to give off? You can largely control what they perceive of you and your attitude by what you wear (sad, but true).
Henry Ford experienced a major setback after designing and improving the Ford Quadricycle. He founded the Detroit Automobile Company in 1899, but the resulting cars they produced did not live up to his standards and were too expensive. The company dissolved in 1901. Ford took this in stride and formed the Henry Ford Company. The sales were slow and the company had financial problems; it wasn’t until 1903 that the Ford Motor Company was successful and put the Ford on the map.
House, Robert J. (1971). “A path-goal theory of leader effectiveness”. Administrative Science Quarterly. Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. 16 (3): 321–339. doi:10.2307/2391905. JSTOR 2391905.
Peter Drucker wrote, “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” In Drucker’s assessment, a leader starts by asking, “What needs to be done?” He noted the increasing prominence of “knowledge workers” and suggested that the new challenge is to lead people rather than manage them.
Intuitiveness. Rapid changes in the world today combined with information overload result in an inability to “know” everything. In other words, reasoning and logic will not get you through all situations. In fact, more and more leaders are learning to the value of using their intuition and trusting their “gut” when making decisions.
Raymond Cattell, a pioneer in the field of personality assessment, developed the Leadership Potential equation in 1954. This equation, which was based on a study of military leaders, is used today to determine the traits which characterize an effective leader. The traits of an effective leader include the following:
Self-Awareness. You have an intimate knowledge of your inner emotional state. You know your strengths and your weaknesses. You know when you’re working in flow and you know when you’re over worked. You know yourself, including your capabilities and your limitations, which allows you to push yourself to maximum potential.
Smith created a world-changing industry — overnight air delivery — that no one knew they needed until finding they couldn’t live without it. His ability to continue leading FedEx (FDX) to be bigger and more successful for 40 years is nearly unique and has sparked such transformative improvements as online package tracking. He’s still pushing and is a hero to the company’s 300,000 employees.
“When you commit to an enormous goal that far exceeds your current capability, willpower won’t solve your problem. Rather, you’ll need a new environment that organically generates your goals — a context that forces you to become more than you currently are. Once you design the right conditions, your desired behavior naturally follows.” -Benjamin Hardy
We don’t need to look far to find evidence of the overwhelming tendency to equate strong leadership with good leadership. As Brown puts it, think about the last time you heard someone say, “What we need is a weak leader.”
Even the most well-intentioned people around you may begin to disparage and discourage you from leaving the safety of the herd. Family, friends, and loved ones all may not understand your choice to go on a new path.
A good leader is unlikely to be aware of their uniqueness or the value that they bring to the organisation as they will be humble, however they will lead a team that performs at a level far higher than others in their industry, upto 202% higher. Outsiders will explain the success as luck or as being in the right place at the right time but there is a uniqueness to all great leaders.
Jump up ^ Larson, J. R. Jr.; Christensen, C.; Abbot, A. S.; Franz, T. M. (1996). “Diagnosing groups: Charting the flow of information in medical decision-making teams”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 71: 315–330. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.71.2.315.

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