“be a leader traits of a successful leader”

You need to understand what your strengths and weaknesses are. And more importantly you need to have the desire to constantly improve upon them. Being open-minded and consistently seeking formal and informal feedback will do much to help you in your improvement efforts.
Be friendly with all members of the team. Don’t play favorites, and work to get to know everyone on your team, from the star player to the slowest member on the JV squad. This will show that you care about everyone who makes the team so unique and strong.
There is so much you need to know and need to learn. The path to success is paved with obstacles that can only be overcome by reading books, gaining mentors, failing and trying again, and learning from your mistakes.
Charles de Gaulle was born in Lille, France, in 1890. After he graduated from the elite military academy Saint-Cyr, he excelled as an infantry lieutenant World War I. During World War II, de Gaulle’s talent for transactional leadership helped him rise to the rank of brigadier general. He was serving as undersecretary for defense under Paul Reynaud when Reynaud was replaced by Philippe Pétain, who favored Nazi collaboration.
Despite preconceived notions, not all groups need have a designated leader. Groups that are primarily composed of women,[115][116] are limited in size, are free from stressful decision-making,[117] or only exist for a short period of time (e.g., student work groups; pub quiz/trivia teams) often undergo a diffusion of responsibility, where leadership tasks and roles are shared amongst members (Schmid Mast, 2002; Berdahl & Anderson, 2007; Guastello, 2007).
We all want to achieve success so we could live a comfortable life—have financial freedom, drive a nice car, and live in a beautiful house. However, although success can be achieved, it does not come easy.
Be helpful off the court. Help load equipment into your team bus, take attendance, and offer rides to any straggling team members. This will show that you care about working together on all aspects of the game, even it’s just driving the freshman player to school so everyone can be a part of the game.
Live purposefully. In order to achieve your dreams and be the person you want to be, you will have to start paying attention to your actions. Ask yourself, “Is what I’m doing going to lead me to where I want to be in life?”[3]
Trust your instinct. If it doesn’t feel right, the chances are it isn’t right. I’m a great believer in the power of the subconscious, given time, to steer us to the right answers. That’s why I often prefer to have a couple of discussions before taking a difficult decision, even if that slows down the process. It helps give me certainty about what I think, and it helps the wider leadership group understand each other’s point of view and build consensus. The end result is a better decision with better buy-in.
A leader cannot be successful if they do not know how to communicate effectively – but there are also many other qualities which they need. Leaders to show, not just tell. Even Richard Branson said,” Communication is the most important skill any leader can possess”. Most problems can be solved with some good, honest and open conversations. But if you are a leader your communication skills are absolutely vital to also inspire your employees, keep them happy and engaged and dazzle your customers and investors.
Though leadership resources and tools abound, plain common sense is necessary for good leadership. Understanding your most deeply held values is also a prerequisite for leadership: you have to know what you stand for. Additionally, leadership involves a certain amount of interacting with people, coaching them, and helping facilitate better performance from them. But leadership isn’t about achieving a static persona, or an unchanging skill set. Leaders must embrace change because it’s going to happen whether they want it to or not. Leaders are also willing to embody the changes they want to see in their organization, making it a place where people want to be and want to contribute.
A good leader must have the discipline to work toward his or her vision single-mindedly, as well as to direct his or her actions and those of the team toward the goal. Action is the mark of a leader. A leader does not suffer “analysis paralysis” but is always doing something in pursuit of the vision, inspiring others to do the same.
Traditional leadership logic (leader-follower) says that organizations need a strong leader to take command and control over an organization in order for it to succeed. This model worked exceptionally well in the past, when workers were performing tasks that are more physical in nature like construction or building widgets on an assembly line.
One of the first reporters to document the rich estate of then-Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, Chornovol faced continual threats and was beaten to within an inch of her life on Christmas Day. The attack added fuel to the Euromaidan protests, which forced Yanukovych’s ouster in February. Chornovol has now been asked to ferret out corruption from inside Ukraine’s interim government.
And finally we come to the last of the six qualities – responsibility. The ability to put up your hand and admit when you’ve done something wrong never comes easily. When there is blame to be accepted for a business error, the owner and leader must be the one to accept it. But responsibility also means being able to reward and congratulate your employees, and spreading accolades and appreciation where appropriate can go a long way. When a business owner is able to accept blame and pass on congratulations to those who truly deserve it, a leader is born.
Control. At the beginning of a team’s life or your tenure as the team leader, when you do not yet have the insight into the team’s capabilities, the right approach is to exert authority and control. It is far easier to start tight and loosen control as needed.
2. Clarity. The only way you can get confidence is by becoming really, really clear about who you are and what is most important to you. New leaders fail when they try to become all things to all people, or try to do too much out of their area of excellence. Clarity helps you say “yes” to the right things — and “no” to others.
Just over a year ago, a puff of white smoke announced the new spiritual leader of 1.2 billion Roman Catholics around the world. In the brief time since, Francis has electrified the church and attracted legions of non-Catholic admirers by energetically setting a new direction. He has refused to occupy the palatial papal apartments, has washed the feet of a female Muslim prisoner, is driven around Rome in a Ford Focus, and famously asked “Who am I to judge?” with regard to the church’s view of gay members. He created a group of eight cardinals to advise him on reform, which a church historian calls the “most important step in the history of the church for the past 10 centuries.” Francis recently asked the world to stop the rock-star treatment. He knows that while revolutionary, his actions so far have mostly reflected a new tone and intentions. His hardest work lies ahead. And yet signs of a “Francis effect” abound: In a poll in March, one in four Catholics said they’d increased their charitable giving to the poor this year. Of those, 77% said it was due in part to the Pope.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *