“be a manager he”

Understand your income. When calculating your income, be sure to take into account the federal, state, and social security taxes that will be deducted from your gross pay. Don’t overlook miscellaneous deductions, such as health insurance premiums, savings bonds and loan payments. The resulting number is your net pay, which is what you end up taking home with you.
Many people have the tendency to compare the low points of their own lives with the high points of other peoples’ lives. Remember that no matter how perfect somebody’s life may seem, behind closed doors everybody deals with tragedy, insecurity, and other difficulties.[8] Pay attention to and limit your use of social media to help you remember this.
“Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone, and as we let our light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
At the same time, don’t be too chatty or social with your employees. It’s healthy to make friends in the workplace, but if all you’re doing is chatting everyone up at the watercooler, people may think you’re more focused on gaining approval than being a good leader.
The Integrated Psychological theory of leadership is an attempt to integrate the strengths of the older theories (i.e. traits, behavioral/styles, situational and functional) while addressing their limitations, largely by introducing a new element – the need for leaders to develop their leadership presence, attitude toward others and behavioral flexibility by practicing psychological mastery. It also offers a foundation for leaders wanting to apply the philosophies of servant leadership and authentic leadership.[51]
People with a fixed mindset think their intelligence or talents are pre-determined traits that cannot be changed. They also believe that talent alone leads to success — without hard work. But they’re wrong.
For example, most schools today have very limited budgets, making it difficult to pay for innovative new programs. When Margaret Chiu, principal of Galileo High School, finds a new program she thinks will benefit her students, she doesn’t waste time lamenting the lack of funding. She gets busy. She immediately begins thinking of who in the community she can ask to help support and pay for the program. She has created partnerships with businesses, local colleges, and health care professionals that help enrich her school’s curriculum.
In 1963, King organized the massive March on Washington, where he made his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech. The passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 is noted as one of the many reasons Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize that same year. Dr. King used his transformational leadership skills to continue inspiring African-Americans and their allies to fight for civil rights using nonviolence means until his assassination in 1968.
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Victor Vroom, in collaboration with Phillip Yetton (1973)[44] and later with Arthur Jago (1988),[45] developed a taxonomy for describing leadership situations, which was used in a normative decision model where leadership styles were connected to situational variables, defining which approach was more suitable to which situation.[46] This approach was novel because it supported the idea that the same manager could rely on different group decision making approaches depending on the attributes of each situation. This model was later referred to as situational contingency theory.[47]
To develop into a great leader, you first need to understand where and how you can truly make an impact. Strong leadership doesn’t maintain the status quo but takes on powerful challenges and finds a way to make a significant difference in any situation.
One way to foster creativity is to offer challenges to group members, making sure that the goals are within the grasp of their abilities. The purpose of this type of exercise is to get people to stretch their limits but to not become discouraged by barriers to success.
You may find that you give up easily, or feel that you cannot achieve success… and this could be the problem! If you can learn to believe in yourself and try to develop new habits and traits that successful people have, this could make success a lot easier and more achievable for you.
“Making your mark on the world is hard. If it were easy, everybody would do it. But it’s not. It takes patience, it takes commitment, and it comes with plenty of failure along the way. The real test is not whether you avoid this failure, because you won’t. It’s whether you let it harden or shame you into inaction, or whether you learn from it; whether you choose to persevere.”[10]
To do this, team members need performance goals that are linked to the team’s overall vision. Our article on Performance Management and KPIs  (Key Performance Indicators) explains one way of doing this, and our Project Management section explains another. And, for day-to-day management of delivering the vision, the Management By Wandering Around  (MBWA) approach helps to ensure that what should happen, really happens.
Self-assurance. Self-confidence and resiliency are common traits among leaders. They tend to be free of guilt and have little or no need for approval. They are generally secure and free from guilt and are usually unaffected by prior mistakes or failures.
One of the most common misunderstandings of leadership is that it’s about acquiring power. The best leaders use whatever power they have–and their time and energy–to collaborate with others. Position yourself as a leader who is there to support the success of those around you. You’ll find that when they succeed, you succeed.
You need a healthy level of self assurance that gives you a practical (sometime impractical) sense of faith in your cause that drives you forward with no excuses, roadblocks or negativity holding you back.
Steve Jobs co-founded Apple Computer with Steve Wozniak in 1976. Apple became known for making intuitive, compact personal computers with the debut of the Macintosh in 1984. In the decades that followed, Jobs’s innovative leadership, including his ability to see potential in new technologies, resulted in his investment in Pixar Animation Studios, creation of iTunes for digital music, and production of products, including the iMac, iPod and iPhone. Known as an uncompromising CEO who demanded innovative design and marketing work from his employees, Jobs helped revolutionize digital and personal technology.
Montezuma II became emperor of the Aztecs in 1502 after the death of his uncle, Ahuitzotl. During his uncle’s rule, Montezuma was commander of the military, using bureaucratic leadership to guide his army on conquering expeditions that expanded the Aztec territory beyond Mexico to Honduras and Nicaragua. As emperor, Montezuma II established provinces throughout the nation, using their structure to obtain tributes and religious sacrifices from both Aztec subjects and the tribes they’d conquered. Historians estimate that he ruled over six million people for almost 20 years. After Montezuma’s 1519 capture by the Spanish and mysterious death in 1520, the Aztec empire fell.
Openness means being able to listen to new ideas, even if they do not conform to the usual way of thinking. Good leaders are able to suspend judgment while listening to others’ ideas, as well as accept new ways of doing things that someone else thought of. Openness builds mutual respect and trust between leaders and followers, and it also keeps the team well supplied with new ideas that can further its vision.
Put even more simply, the leader is the inspiration and director of the action. He or she is the person in the group that possesses the combination of personality and leadership skills that makes others want to follow his or her direction.
The Situational Leadership® proposed by Hersey suggests four leadership-styles and four levels of follower-development. For effectiveness, the model posits that the leadership-style must match the appropriate level of follower-development. In this model, leadership behavior becomes a function not only of the characteristics of the leader, but of the characteristics of followers as well.[50]
Make decisions and take responsibility for the consequences. To exert influence and tackle bigger problems, you’re going to need decision-making power, and those decisions will affect the people who grant you that power. This is as much a responsibility as it is an honor. Not only do you need to be able to make sound decisions, but you also need to be willing to be held accountable to them. If things go wrong, people will assume it’s your fault (whether it is or not).
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18.  “I think leadership comes from integrity–that you do whatever you ask others to do. I think there are non-obvious ways to lead. Just by providing a good example as a parent, a friend, a neighbor makes it possible for other people to see better ways to do things. Leadership does not need to be a dramatic, fist in the air and trumpets blaring, activity.” –Scott Berkun
Appreciative – A wise leader values their team and the person. Success is only achieved with the help of others. What’s more, genuine appreciation provides encouragement, develops confidence, and builds on strengths.
Act professionally. Though you may be the boss, you should still be cordial to all of your employees. You should also still meet the basic standards of professionalism such as; dressing appropriately, coming to work and meetings on time, and communicating in a professional manner.
Dominance. Leaders are often times competitive and decisive and usually enjoy overcoming obstacles. Overall, they are assertive in their thinking style as well as their attitude in dealing with others.
Consistent, frequent meetings like monthly one-on-ones are a great way to make sure you’re giving enough attention to everyone. It might seem like a lot of time spent, but employee development is your most important job.
Ability to Motivate. Leaders don’t lead by telling people what they have to do. Instead, leaders cause people to want to help them. A key part of this is cultivating your own desire to help others. When others sense that you want to help them, they in turn want to help you.

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