“do your best do it everyday to know to do good and do it not”

“Communication is the real work of leadership,” says HBS professor Nitin Nohria, who documented the importance of persuasion in his 1992 book Beyond the Hype: Rediscovering the Essence of Management. Nohria believes effective leaders are masters of the classical elements of rhetoric, as outlined by Aristotle centuries ago. “You can reach people through logos or logic, by appealing to their sense of what is rational,” he explains. “You can use pathos, appealing to their emotions, or you can make an argument based on their sense of values or ethos.” Great leaders, he notes, “spend the bulk of their time communicating, and they know how to employ all three of Aristotle’s rhetorical elements.”
In fact, in organizations, one of the reasons employees are promoted to positions such as team leader, supervisor, or department manager, is that they have demonstrated over time that people will follow them.
Jump up ^ Headquarters, Department of the Army (2006). “Army Leadership. Competent, Confident, and Agile”. FM 6-22. Washington, D.C., 12 October 2006 p. 18. Publication available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at (www.train.army.mil).
Use newsletters, your company intranet and team meetings to help spread the word. And, whenever there’s a change – good, bad or ugly – update your employees and tell them why it’s happening. And, expect the same from your direct reports.
20. Show compassion and care. Compassion helps to bridge the gaps between what the organization needs, what your people want, and what you can give. And it’s the leaders who show compassion who are the most admired.
A leader should be organized because it shows that they know what they are doing. If a leader is unorganized, people may start to question their policies and whether they really know what they are doing. Organization is also useful for the leader him/herself because it allows that person to keep track of their expectations and whether or not their subordinates have followed through on them. Essentially, a leader both looks and feels better if they are organized.
9. Invest in people. To be a great leader, you need to start at the heart of what matters in your organization–and what matters is your people. If you want to see them happy, engaged, loyal and dedicated, make the time to invest in them, nurture them and provide them with a clear vision of what needs to be done.
3. Care. The strongest, most effective leaders I’ve met care not just about the business, but about the people in it and the people impacted by it. Plus, they show they care through their words and actions, even proving how they care for themselves and their family by taking unplugged vacations and continuing their own professional development. Care shouldn’t be a four-letter word in our workplace today — and the best leaders know it.
It’s safe to say that all great leaders will have to enter unchartered waters at some point during their career (figuratively, of course). Because of this, they have to be able to trust their intuition and draw on past experiences to guide them.
When you believe in what you are trying to succeed, you believe in yourself and what you can do. Therefore, you are very likely to become committed to proving to yourself that you can succeed. People who are not committed will find this very hard as they could lose on their goals and give up before they reach success.
Get in the habit of paying attention to small details around you. Appreciate the feeling of the sun on your skin, the sensation of your feet walking on the ground, or the artwork in the restaurant you are eating in. Noticing things like these will help you silence a rambling mind and appreciate every moment.
Keep in mind that it is perfectly fine to spend some time doing nothing and just being lazy each day. This can actually help with your imagination and self-awareness. Strive for a balance between doing things you want to do and allowing yourself to just “be.”
A clear, strong vision serves as a rallying point for employees. It helps people and teams prioritize investments and improvements. It gives everyone in an organization something to strive for in their daily pursuits. 
Leadership is the capacity to lead employees and companies through change. A leader must have the ability to cognitively reframe a company depending upon changing conditions, according to Haydn Shaughnessy, a contributor to Forbes magazine. Whether it is the ability to adapt to new technology or new economic challenges, a great leader is someone who can adjust to change quickly and with enthusiasm. In Shaughnessy’s 25 years in technology development, he has seen great leaders excel depending upon their ability to embrace change and learn new innovative ways of doing business.
Gain pleasure. Avoid pain. That’s pretty much what we’re wired for. But is there more to life? Will Edwards considered the question and realized that there is. He realized that we need to wake up to our life purpose and dedicate ourselves to fulfilling it. That’s the only way we’ll live to the full. In 7 Keys to Success, he discusses what it takes to do just that:
Jump up ^ Ilies, Remus; Morgeson, Frederick P.; Nahrgang, Jennifer D. (2005-06-01). “Authentic leadership and eudaemonic well-being: Understanding leader–follower outcomes”. The Leadership Quarterly. 16 (3): 373–394. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.002. ISSN 1048-9843.
When discussing business leadership, a distinction is often made between good management and good leadership. Managers are thought to be the budgeters, the organizers, the controllers — the ants, as one observer puts it — while leaders are the charismatic, big-picture visionaries, the ones who change the whole ant farm. But such a construction, those interviewed for this article agree, erroneously leads to a bimodal way of looking at something that should really be evaluated on two separate scales. “Everybody has got a little bit of each in them,” says John Kotter, who admits he is sometimes guilty of using the dichotomy in an effort at simplification. “It’s much better to think in terms of measuring people on a zero-to-ten scale for each quality.”
16. Have fun. Business may be serious, but the best leaders know how to build excitement and fun. They’re great at creating an optimistic culture and an enthusiastic environment–they know fun’s important when people are working hard.
Selectively lower your confidence.[1] You read it right: lower your confidence. It’s a truism in business that you need to have high self-confidence to get things done. But some people think, and for good reason, that lower self-confidence makes people more successful, for these reasons:

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