“good leader what makes a manager effective”

We all want to achieve success so we could live a comfortable life—have financial freedom, drive a nice car, and live in a beautiful house. However, although success can be achieved, it does not come easy.

This can vary but tends to involve good self-confidence, a lot of luck, the willingness to seize opportunities when they present themselves, planning goals and sticking to them and being observant about what others need and want in the world.

There is little point having a leader incapable of making a decision, even if it turns out to be the wrong one. Being indecisive can undermine confidence and trust. Leaders must lead, take a chance and make a decision based on the facts to hand. This is the core skill of any successful leader. Gordon Brown as prime minister lost much of the confidence of his close allies when he failed to decide to call a general election in 2007 that he could have won with ease. A lack of decision making and clarity of purpose will lead to a rapid loss of support and credibility.

I wish I had spent more time studying résumés for clues about potential rather than their narrow skillset as listed on a sheet of paper. I should have looked for things like an interest in hang-gliding or animal rescue as a sign that the person was ambitious and daring. I should have questioned the overly detailed résumé that listed everything about previous work assignments but nothing about risk-taking or aspirations for growth.

In Laissez-faire or free-rein leadership, decision-making is passed on to the sub-ordinates. The sub-ordinates are given complete right and power to make decisions to establish goals and work out the problems or hurdles.[citation needed]

To transition from a manager to a leader, you must let go of the reins and allow your team to take full control of their roles and responsibilities. Believe in their abilities wholeheartedly, even if the position they are taking on is more demanding. Not only will this give you the opportunity to put more of an emphasis on long-term goals, capabilities, and the company’s vision, it also helps everyone grow and develop. So be sure to give them (and you!) the opportunities they deserve.

There’s no such thing as a fleeting cause célèbre for Jolie; since joining forces with the UN’s refugee agency in 2001, first as a goodwill ambassador and now as special envoy, she’s undertaken 50 field missions to countries including Iraq, Syria, and Pakistan. Her decision to explain her preemptive double mastectomy in a New York Times editorial, though controversial in some health circles, underscored her willingness to foster hard conversations by taking a public stand. “Angelina Jolie represents a new type of leadership in the 21st century,” says U.K. Foreign Secretary William Hague, who has worked with Jolie on efforts to end a plague of rape in war-torn regions. “Her strength lies in the fact that she is able to influence governments and move public opinion at the same time.” Jolie chooses to use her global influence to highlight neglected human rights and humanitarian issues, adds Hague, “is in keeping with the finest traditions of leadership.”

I would say his/her humility.  True leaders recognize they’re nobody special; they’re just like everybody else. Therefore, they treat people like they would be treated; no being high and mighty.  They also like to roll up their sleeves and put work in like another laborer.  Isn’t it true that in wartime , the soldiers will listen to the officers with wartime experience much more than the officers out of West Point, Annapolis, and the other military academies?                         

A UNC-Wilmington grad born and raised in North Carolina, Kaitlyn always knew she would end up in NYC to pursue writing. As a summer editorial intern, she contributes career advice to The Muse. In addition, she also writes for other publications, such as USA TODAY College, Her Campus, and The Huffington Post. You can find her searching the city for the best eats, binge-watching Netflix, or catching up with friends at dinner. Say hi on Twitter @KaitlynRussell_

Or say you want to land 50 new customers. That’s your goal; your routine is to contact a certain number of leads per day, check in with a certain number of current customers, network with a certain number of potential partners…your routine is what you will do, without fail, that will allow you to achieve your goal. Follow that routine and faithfully meet your deadlines and if your plan is great, you will land your new customers.

David Logan talks about the five kinds of tribes that humans naturally form — in schools, workplaces, even the driver’s license bureau. By understanding our shared tribal tendencies, we can help lead each other to become better individuals.

But you can only lead if other people are prepared to follow. That means you have to win and retain their respect, not just for your position but for you as a person, for your experience, skills and competence. A leader has to have a strong rapport with, and understanding of, the organisation and the people he or she is leading: what they want, and what they will accept if they can’t have what they want. Emotional intelligence and intuition are important in forming these links.

“Humility simply means you have a burning, driving, relentless ambition to serve and to win,” Collins told me, “Without the arrogance to delude yourself into believing that you are all knowing or always right.”

The most junior eat first, followed in rank order, with the leaders eating last. This isn’t a rule, they simply do this because in the Marines, they believe that the responsibility of a leader is to put others’ needs above their own.

Ask for opinions in a face-to-face situations. At the end of a meeting, you can casually ask if people have any questions or opinions. This will give your employees time to consider what they’re working on. You may also pull individual employees aside, or invite them to your office, to discuss the project further. Tell them that their perspective is crucial to your success.

Don’t wait for feedback from your team — they may never offer it. After all, you’re the one dictating how things are going; they may not think their opinion matters. Ask them how you’re doing, how they’re doing, and what they see to make the whole process better. Just because they’re not leading doesn’t mean they’re not full of great ideas!

Probably the most difficult job for a leader is to persuade others to follow. It can only be possible if you inspire your followers by setting a good example. When the going gets tough, they look up to you and see how you react to the situation. If you handle it well, they will follow you. As a leader, should think positive and this positive approach should be visible through your actions. Stay calm under pressure and keep the motivation level up. As John Quincy Adams puts it, “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” If you are successful in inspiring your subordinates, you can easily overcome any current and future challenge easily.

After his native Bangladesh fought a war to become independent, Abed established BRAC (originally Bangladesh Rehabilitation Assistance Committee) to aid the rural poor, including 10 million returning refugees. He has built it into the world’s largest nonprofit, with over 100,000 employees serving millions in 10 Asian and African countries. He was knighted in 2010.

Walt Disney (1901-1966), had his share of hardships and challenges; and like any great leader, he managed to stay positive and find new opportunities. In 1928, Disney found that his film producer, Charles Mintz, wanted to reduce his payments for the Oswald series. Mintz threatened to cut ties entirely if Disney didn’t accept his terms, and Disney chose to part ways. But in leaving Oswald, Disney decided to create something new: the iconic Mickey Mouse.

Identify your passions. Before you can achieve success, you will have to define what success means to you. While it may take years to realize what you want to do with your life, identifying your passions, interests, and values will help you set goals and give your life a sense of meaning. If you have trouble identifying these things, then ask a friend or family member to help you. Ask yourself the following questions:

What most people do: Wing it. They make a list of the reasons why they should get a raise — why they DESERVE it — and then they practice what they’re going to say in their heads a few times. They think the fact that they’ve done great work will be enough.

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