“good leadership essays leadership respect quotes”

It’s easy to dismiss the concept of “vision” as vague and woolly, but the best school leaders are visionaries with a clear sense of moral purpose. Successful leaders have “great vision – the ability to formulate and shape the future, rather than be shaped by events”, says Richard Harman, headmaster of Uppingham School, Rutland.

A successful pursuit might be going to the grocery store with your children and not experiencing any meltdowns or tantrums. A successful pursuit could be securing an interview for the job of your dreams. Or, a successful pursuit could simply be getting out of bed in the morning.

Why should your staff and team members give it their all if you don’t bother to? By proving your own commitment, great leaders will inspire others to do the same, as well as earn their respect and instill a good work ethic.

You need to understand just what the corporate objectives are. In other words, what is the organization producing and more importantly, what benefits will the product or services have for its customers. People prefer to have a global purpose; they would rather know that the actions they are performing each day will result in positive consequences.

Experteer GmbH is an online recruitment marketplace headquartered in Munich, Germany. Our business has a simple purpose of connecting outstanding professionals to great careers. The success of our consumers and partners provides the real meaning to our business. This site has been created with a vision to further the success of our consumers by sharing findings and views in the senior professional careers space.

Leaders also need to be able to make good decisions in support of their strategy delivery, and solve problems. With a positive attitude, problems can become opportunities and learning experiences, and a leader can gain much information from a problem addressed.

What makes a good leader? Just like what is the best leadership style? There is no magic formula nor is there a one-size-fits-all answer. Perhaps we should agree on what has been proven to result in a good leader? Some might believe that a good leader can be measured from a qualitative perspective, meaning that he or she has built a reputation of being a good boss! Personally I prefer — and for the of this article — we should use a more measurable approach to define just what makes a good leader.

Google’s (GOOG) employee No. 16 officially joined the company in 1999 as its first marketing manager, just a year after Larry Page and Sergey Brin set up their first office in her Menlo Park, Calif., garage. Widely admired within the Googleplex for her management style, Wojcicki was instrumental in guiding the evolution of the company’s hugely successful advertising and commerce platforms. Now, many expect Wojcicki, who took the helm of Google’s YouTube division in February, to rev up the troops there.

One of my greatest challenges as a leader had to do with my introverted personality. I didn’t share enough about myself, my family life, and my aspirations for the team. (I’ve since realized how being hyper-focused and analytical by nature also helped me get promoted and were probably my greatest strengths.) I wish I had tried to understand my team’s personal motivations more and relate on a personal level.

Another important quality of transformational leadership involves a focus on providing one-on-one communication with group members. Good leaders should express sincere care and concern for the members of their group both verbally and nonverbally.

There’s no playbook for how to become an elite leader in basketball. Whether it’s John Wooden teaching his UCLA players the proper way to tie their shoes or Zen master (and new Knicks president) Phil Jackson referencing Buddha, the point is to get five players working in harmony — however you do it. Three active coaches with very different styles stand out. We’re hard-pressed to say which is best: Duke’s Coach K (above, right), who has developed players for decades with a mixture of toughness and love — in the process becoming the winningest Division I men’s college basketball coach in history and leading the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team to a pair of gold medals? Or the famously terse Coach Pop, who empowers his players by sometimes stepping back? “What do you want me to do?” he has challenged his stars in a time-out. “Figure it out.” And they do: Coach Pop has had more consecutive winning seasons (16) than any active NBA coach. Or Dawn Staley, who has led women’s teams at Temple and South Carolina to storied records? The former WNBA star initially didn’t want to coach. But as Staley noted at her induction into the National Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013, she knew she made the right decision when “I started to care more about my players than to win.” That might be the common trait of the great ones.

But what we often don’t realize is that genuine success isn’t attained in one huge, monumental push. Genuine success is made up of many smaller achievements, day to day. Becoming a successful runner isn’t crossing the finish line of your first race. It’s built on the accomplishment of every training run and exercise you complete along the way.

Above all, leadership is a people job. When an employee needs to talk with you–whatever the reason–make sure that you set aside the time to do so. Put your work aside for a moment, put down your smartphone, and focus on the person standing in front of you.

This energy shift won’t happen automatically; rather, leaders must make a conscious, intentional shift. Leaders play a key role in harnessing the energy of their followers to ride this new wave of economic recovery – regardless of the size of the surf.

People learn by doing, and letting staff work things out for themselves and make their own mistakes is part of growing as a person and an employee. Times may be tough and change may be complex to cope with, but if the boss wants maximum energy behind the mission then don’t wrap them in cotton wool and don’t let them hide behind processes. The “computer says no” culture is holding back many large organisations.

Confidence can be had in any situation. Imagine saying, “I don’t know the answer,” while looking down, thumbs twiddling, and your legs fidgeting. Now imagine saying, “I don’t know the answer,” with your head up, your shoulders back, and looking the speaker in the eye. Not knowing something is fine — just be confident that you don’t know it! A lack of knowledge has nothing to do with your confidence (or ability to lead).

In leadership, people and relationships are more important than tasks. Tasks do matter, but the main role of a good leader is to motivate and inspire other people to do the tasks well. You need to know how to delegate and be the leader of other leaders. The leader is the conductor of the orchestra, not the first violin. But you also need to know when to step in and take responsibility. Don’t be afraid to say ‘stop’ or ‘no’ if you think things are going wrong. And don’t let other people push you into a decision which you are not comfortable with.

So what are the qualities of a good leader? On the most basic level, leadership styles can be categorized as being manipulative, authoritative, or attractive. While all of these styles might get the job done, can you guess which one is the most effective in the long-run?

For example, when you start a new project, you will probably have lots of enthusiasm for it, so it’s often easy to win support for it at the beginning. However, it can be difficult to find ways to keep your vision inspiring after the initial enthusiasm fades, especially if the team or organization needs to make significant changes in the way that it does things. Leaders recognize this, and they work hard throughout the project to connect their vision with people’s individual needs, goals and aspirations.

So, do not waste your time searching for the “perfect” leader. Chances are that you already have one in your organization! Whether they are one of the 20% or the 60%, all you need is to be able to identify those individuals and determine how to best develop their skills.

Explain that your coach is looking out for your team’s best interests. Show your teammates that your coach knows his stuff and should be trusted. This will keep your team strong and will make you look like a fair leader.

Trust in people because you need to. As John Donne once wrote, “No man is an island.” What he meant by this is that no man works alone, entirely independently, however much he thinks he does. We depend on other people, whether we like it or not. Placing trust in other people is a necessity, not an option.

Identify potential mentors who have similar values, then have casual meetings with them to find the one with whom you have good rapport. Be prepared to explain what you hope to learn, why you value their insight and expertise, and what you bring to the relationship.

Financially successful people do at least one thing better than just about everyone around them. (Of course it helps if you pick something to be great at that the world also values–and will pay for.)

According to Dave Ulrich, named the most influential person in HR by HR Magazine, approximately 20% of all people are naturally-born leaders, while another 20% do not possess the necessarily skills and qualities and will never be good leaders.

You must know your reasons for wanting to learn how to become successful and achieve your goals. This is the only way you can persevere when the going gets tough and achieve your goals. When things get challenging, reflect on what caused you to pursue this path in the first place. Were you conventionally successful but internally unhappy? Have you not utilized your skills as much as you would like to? Are you trying to become a more well-rounded individual? Whatever your reason for wanting to succeed, use these motivations as the cornerstone of your desire to work hard and achieve more.

It’s important you provide ample channels for two-way communication between employees and managers, and also solicit and reward them for their ideas and contributions. This facilitates progress toward reaching organizational goals.

Instead, create benchmarks: “My goal is to increase my productivity by 30% and only be late for work five times per year, at the most.” These are quantifiable goals that when achieved, give you a sense of satisfaction and completion, making you feel successful and confident.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *