“growing as a leader what would you undertake to show yourself”

To be an effective leader, you should be confident enough to ensure that other follow your commands. If you are unsure about your own decisions and qualities, then your subordinates will never follow you. As a leader, you have to be oozing with confidence, show some swagger and assertiveness to gain the respect of your subordinates. This does not mean that you should be overconfident, but you should at least reflect the degree of confidence required to ensure that your followers trust you as a leader.
Leaders also need to know how to give others their views on personal performance in a way that will be constructive rather than destructive, and also hear others’ opinions of them. See our page on Giving and Receiving Feedback for more.
But to read Archie Brown’s fascinating book, The Myth of the Strong Leader, is to see an illustration that leaders like Suárez, who served as prime minister of Spain from 1976 to 1981, possess leadership styles and capacities that are incredibly effective, and depressingly rare.
Lamar Anderson, Director of Product and Programs at Owens Corning, knows this to be true. “I treat everyone with the same level of respect, from the cleaning crew to the CEO. I stop to speak to many people throughout my day, just to say hello. I create an environment where many people feel comfortable opening up to me about very personal things. My peers and higher-ups can see for themselves how people interact with me, and it is easier for someone to do something for you when they genuinely like you as a person and respect you in return.”
Leen Sawalha’s interest in the effects of motivation and behaviour on businesses has led her to obtain a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a Bachelor of Commerce specializing in Human Resources Management. Currently in the process of acquiring her MBA, Leen’s expertise lies in the integration of both disciplines to enhance the effectiveness of an organization’s human capital.
If you’re working on a project, your goals and expectations should be clear from the beginning. Then your employees will be more motivated and not confused. It is preferable to have your goals down in written form.
The search for the characteristics or traits of leaders has continued for centuries. Philosophical writings from Plato’s Republic[12] to Plutarch’s Lives have explored the question “What qualities distinguish an individual as a leader?” Underlying this search was the early recognition of the importance of leadership[citation needed] and the assumption that leadership is rooted in the characteristics that certain individuals possess. This idea that leadership is based on individual attributes is known as the “trait theory of leadership”.
No matter where you are on the chain, you can work on this. Do you excel at reports, but clam up when it’s time to speak during a meeting? Alternatively, are you a natural when it comes to conversation—but secretly worried that your lack of grammar know-how will hold you back?
Believe that anyone can be a leader. Truth be told, everyone is looking to be led. Think of life as a dark path — the more leaders you have, the more people are in front of you holding industrial strength flashlights. Which would you rather have? Not only do people want leaders, but also they are looking for them. For that reason, anyone can do it. You just got to fill the void.
Kishore Mahbubani and Klaus Schwab name a few leaders who exemplify the qualities of great leadership. Five elements – heart, brain, muscle, nerve, and soul – are key for Schwab, while compassion, canniness, and courage as well as the ability to identify talent and understand complexity are essential for Mahbubani. They say extraordinary circumstances, like the ones we are facing, could give rise to “heroic leaders.”
The affective tone of the group. Group affective tone represents the consistent or homogeneous affective reactions within a group. Group affective tone is an aggregate of the moods of the individual members of the group and refers to mood at the group level of analysis. Groups with leaders in a positive mood have a more positive affective tone than do groups with leaders in a negative mood.[64]
Business growth involves taking risks that don’t always pan out. Be willing to stand up for your employees and their decisions when expectations aren’t met. This will motivate your employees to feel they can accomplish what’s needed to achieve the organization’s goals.
Of course, as people move into more senior positions, their specific domain expertise tends to go down as they develop the ability to communicate across a broader set of company disciplines. Their soft skills actually improve. They begin to spend less time “in the trenches” and more time looking for overarching solutions—which is great. Which means, at this point that, assuming specific, deep domain expertise becomes slightly less of a priority, motivational and organization skills should increase respectively.

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