“how do you a you must engage in ________________.”

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As he begins his 20th and final season in pinstripes, Jeter remains the type of role-model player that even a Red Sox fan must grudgingly respect. It’s not the five World Series rings he’s won or his team record for career hits. In a steroid-tainted, reality-TV era, Jeter, the son of two Army veterans, continues to stand out because of his old-school approach: Never offer excuses or give less than maximum effort.

It’s safe to say that all great leaders will have to enter unchartered waters at some point during their career (figuratively, of course). Because of this, they have to be able to trust their intuition and draw on past experiences to guide them.

Be a good friend to your teammates. Though you should be respected first of all, being a team captain is more casual than being a boss, and you should make an effort to make friends so you can have fun while working hard.

Successful people know this. They invest an immense amount of time on a daily basis to develop a growth mindset, acquire new knowledge, learn new skills and change their perception so that it can benefit their lives.

Once you take on a supervisory position, it’s time to trust your team to handle logistics while you focus on the vision and direction of your organization. This shows everyone that you believe in them, boosting their confidence and inspiring them to take more control of their work—which is essential to their own development as well as your progress.

Identify the things/skills/material needed to achieve your objectives. If you want to be a famous speaker, for example, you need a broad vocabulary, subject knowledge, speech writing, voice clarity, and presentation skills. This is identifying short term objectives to achieve long term goals.

Introverts are not only quieter than extroverts, but they’re also generally calm and collected. In noisy and chaotic organizations, which are often cauldrons of emotion, an introvert’s presence is like a salve to the psyche. Their quiet energy is a hidden asset. As Beth Buelow, author of Insight: Reflections on the Gifts of Being an Introvert, notes: “My energy tends to be a calming presence, which means I don’t take up too much space in a room or conversation. And I don’t need to take up a lot of space. I have a greater influence when I am intentional and deliberate in my speech and presence.”

Jump up ^ Sorrentino, Richard M.; Field, Nigel. “Emergent leadership over time: The functional value of positive motivation”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 50 (6): 1091–1099. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.50.6.1091.

Cool-headed, farseeing, visionary, courageous – whichever adjectives you choose, leadership is a winning combination of personal traits and the ability to think and act as a leader, a person who directs the activities of others for the good of all.

A visionary leader, though, does need lieutenants who can take their vision and translate it into day-to-day work for the rest of the organization. If it’s all vision and strategy with no tie to day-to-day execution, employees will get confused and ultimately leave.

It sounds corny, and maybe you can overdo this one, but I honestly believe many employees in young companies need constant encouragement. We live in complex, competitive times and people are inundated with too many tasks and not enough time. Technology and business life can be overwhelming, so important to point out any “wins” no matter how small. And, if you do have to criticize, think seriously about the impact first.

In Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders Captain David Marquet outlines how he implemented the leader-leader model while in charge of a nuclear submarine, the USS Santa Fe. Captain Marquet outlines four primary pillars of the leader-leader model:

Using the OKR system, you set one high-level, vague objective like “be the thought leader in employee engagement” with two or three key results to help you hit that objective, like “speak at three conferences” and “publish four blog posts”.

In the article What is a Leader I’ve defined it as “a credible person who can alters one’s thought, feelings or actions in a manner that enlists others to pursue the accomplishment of a common goal.” Thus, a good leader is someone that can sustain the enlistment of others in order to pursue a common goal.

6. Take responsibility. When projects go well, good leaders point to their teams’ hard work and share the praise. And when there are failures, they take ownership, regardless of how mistakes were made. If and when something goes wrong, avoid pointing fingers. Instead, work with your team to address the issue and identify ways to prevent it from happening in the future.

Show your love and affection for your spouse and children. Though you may be an authority figure, you are also a mother or father, and it’s important to tell your children how much you love them, to hug them, and to tell them they’re special every single day.

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