“how to be a boss what does it take to be a leader essay”

Having the team understand their objectives is also crucial to their performance and success. Being able to communication the How, What, Where and Why of an organization’s objective to the team ensures that they are all moving harmoniously in one single direction. Leaders with good communication skills are also viewed as being more credible. Their charismatic nature increases the trust and confidence that the team has in their leader’s abilities.
Executives are energetic, outgoing, and competitive. They can be visionary, hard-working, and decisive. However, managers need to be aware of unsuccessful executives who once showed management potential but who are later dismissed or retired early. They typically fail because of personality factors rather than job performances.[126]
From Phil Knight, CEO of Nike Inc.: “There is an immutable conflict at work in life and in business, a constant battle between peace and chaos. Neither can be mastered, but both can be influenced. How you go about that is the key to success.”
Act professionally. Though you may be the boss, you should still be cordial to all of your employees. You should also still meet the basic standards of professionalism such as; dressing appropriately, coming to work and meetings on time, and communicating in a professional manner.
Most of us simply exist from one day to the next instead of really living. “To succeed, you must have a dream… and you must completely commit yourself to its ultimate fulfillment,” Edwards writes. The dream can be as big as you want as long as it’s your dream and not someone else’s.
If you shift your mindset into being an open, thirsty mind that is hungry for knowledge (and humble enough to accept correction), you’ll become more capable than 90% of the population to achieve massive success.
Courageous – Perhaps I should have put this at the top of my list? A courageous leader is prepared to take risks when no one else will. A courageous leader has faith in other people. A courageous leader raises difficult issues, is ready to give difficult feedback, and share unpopular opinions.
The second characteristic is being able to communicate. Some leaders are great orators, but speaking well isn’t all that’s required of a leader. As we all know, there are lots of people who talk a great game but deliver nothing. Leaders who communicate well are those who not only share their thoughts with employees, but also let their strength and personal character show through in their communication, and empower those who work for them by defining the company’s goal and showing how to get there.
They are clear and concise at all times–there is no question of their vision and what needs to be accomplished. This gives others the opportunity to digest their goals and decide whether or not they will support their cause. Generally, very few people know what they want, much less how to get there, so they will gravitate towards those who appear to have a clear picture in mind–good clarity leads to great achievement.
The next requirement is the realization that the goal cannot be achieved alone, without the help of others. Is there a natural grouping of people from whom you can elicit help? Or do you have to recruit your followers? In the latter, you face a greater challenge. But whatever the situation, the leader must integrate his (or the organization’s) goal with his followers’ personal goals and then communicates this goal in such a way that they embrace it too and the goal becomes a common goal.
This is far more complex than it actually sounds. Good communication skills are essential for a great leader. You may very well understand the cave of crazy that is your brain, but that doesn’t mean that you can adequately take the ideas out of it and explain them to someone else.
Even the most well-intentioned people around you may begin to disparage and discourage you from leaving the safety of herd. Family, friends, and loved ones all may not understand your choice to go on a new path.
The song was first released as Drake’s follow-up track to “Best I Ever Had” for his So Far Gone mixtape, with Songz and Lil Wayne received featuring credits.[2] After the success of the two singles, Drake decided to release a retail version of the mixtape in the form of an extended play, including the song.[2] On Songz’s third album, Ready, he included the track, however Drake’s verse was moved to the middle and Lil Wayne’s rap was taken out in order to include a new verse by Songz.[2]
My friend would do far better for himself if he simply published his book, accepted some criticisms and the fact that he didn’t immediately make the New York Times Best Seller list…and start on his second book.
“Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone, and as we let our light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
7. Start being grateful: feeling grateful is one of the most medicinal emotions we can feel it elevates your mood and it fills you with happiness, if we are going to be successful at this thing called, life, we have to start being grateful for the things that happen in our live, no matter how good or bad each of us has it, you have to make to start making it a practice to be grateful for your life. because the truth is, we often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude. life isn’t about having what we want. never let the things you want make you forget the things you have.
To make his case, Brown sorts successful leaders into two categories. “Redefining” leaders radically change the political landscape, not by “[seeking] centre ground” but by “[moving] the centre in their direction.” Brown puts Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson in this category, because several of their signature achievements—FDR’s New Deal, and LBJ’s War on Poverty and dedication to civil rights—have had a major and lasting impact on American society. We tend to think of these men as strong leaders, and in many ways we’re right. But Brown shows a different side of the story: because of the checks and balances of the American political system, neither FDR nor LBJ had the ability to govern by fiat. Their strength lay in their power to persuade—to convince their colleagues in government, and the American people, to understand and support their point of view.
Work on those four fundamental attributes, especially independence (effectoive thinking, decision making, creativity).  If you already have a titled position, then by all means prioritize the people skills.  The most important of these is understanding and managing yourself.  Beyond that, work on: communication, delegation, negotiation, and networking.
15. Stop micromanaging. Leaders who micromanage their teams are not allowing the talented to excel, the gifted to produce, and the experienced to make best use of their skills. If you want to be a better leader, step back and give people the room they need to do their best.
4. Start engaging with people you admire: Having people you admire and look up to in your life can be a great resource for learning and motivation. Reaching out to successful people you admire and respect is a wise career strategy. Start hanging out with people who are dependable and reliable, make the relationships around you, people you can admire. Always choose relationship should be based on respect and trust, make sure that their words are matched with actions and deeds. and it means surround yourself by people you admire and respect. If you want to get ahead, one of the best ways to do this is to find out from others how they got there and did it. I don’t think that people take enough time to tell people who inspire them what an impact they make on their lives!

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