“how to be a great leader being leaders”

In short, the definition of leadership has nothing to do with the hierarchy or position of anyone in the company; it has nothing to do with imposing views but with listening to those who know. Leadership is the attitude assumed by those looking for something different, who are committed to achieving a goal and whose conviction they manage to transmit to others through enthusiasm and optimism to reach a common goal.
For particular types of analysis that may be helpful in gathering information, see our pages on SWOT Analysis, PESTLE Analysis, Porter’s Five Forces, The Boston Matrix and The Ansoff Matrix, The McKinsey 7 S Model of Organisational Alignment, Value Chain Analysis, Scenario Analysis, and Understanding Game Theory.
Do you want to be successful and accomplished in your career or life in general? Maybe you feel that you could succeed more in certain areas of your life and would like to find out how others have achieved success? To be successful, not only do you need the right skills but you also need the traits of a successful person.
They look for the good in every situation and in every person. They seek the valuable lessons contained in every problem or setback. They never experience “failures;” instead, write them off as “learning experiences.”
A leader is a person who influences a group of people towards a specific result. It is not dependent on title or formal authority. (Elevos, paraphrased from Leaders, Bennis, and Leadership Presence, Halpern & Lubar.) Ogbonnia (2007) defines an effective leader “as an individual with the capacity to consistently succeed in a given condition and be viewed as meeting the expectations of an organization or society.” Leaders are recognized by their capacity for caring others, clear communication, and a commitment to persist.[96] An individual who is appointed to a managerial position has the right to command and enforce obedience by virtue of the authority of their position. However, she or he must possess adequate personal attributes to match this authority, because authority is only potentially available to him/her. In the absence of sufficient personal competence, a manager may be confronted by an emergent leader who can challenge her/his role in the organization and reduce it to that of a figurehead. However, only authority of position has the backing of formal sanctions. It follows that whoever wields personal influence and power can legitimize this only by gaining a formal position in the hierarchy, with commensurate authority.[94] Leadership can be defined as one’s ability to get others to willingly follow. Every organization needs leaders at every level.[97]
If you practice consistently, you can be a great leader too. Make small changes your habits when you work with your team – wherever that may be. Most of us aren’t presidents or CEOs. But we all work with other people, and our actions always impact others. This gives every person the chance to develop leadership skills and to stand out from the crowd.
In the 19th century the elaboration of anarchist thought called the whole concept of leadership into question. (Note that the Oxford English Dictionary traces the word “leadership” in English only as far back as the 19th century.) One response to this denial of élitism came with Leninism, which demanded an élite group of disciplined cadres to act as the vanguard of a socialist revolution, bringing into existence the dictatorship of the proletariat.
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Whether in fact a person is born a leader or develops skills and abilities to become a leader is open for debate. There are some clear characteristics that are found in good leaders. These qualities can be developed or may be naturally part of their personality. Let us explore them further.
Dwight D. Eisenhower became the 34th president of the United States in 1953 after serving as commanding general of the Allied forces in World War II. His democratic/participative leadership style, skill in coalition-building, and ability to inspire confidence in others led him through two terms as an enormously popular president. He managed postwar military tension with Russia and China while overseeing the U.S. during its highest rate of economic prosperity. President Eisenhower was also an excellent negotiator who brokered the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953.
Bezos is an extremely rare combination of visionary and master builder — 20 years ago seeing something no one else could see and then turning it into the world’s No. 2 Most Admired Company (after Apple) on our list, with a recent market value of $174 billion (AMZN). Prospective employees are still drawn to his vision; though he’s highly demanding, thousands aspire to work for him. That’s one way to know a great leader when you see one.
If you are working closely with a team, use them to your advantage. What roles do they feel best suited for? How is their time being utilized? What ideas do they have that have yet to be implemented? In many cases, growth is a matter of rearranging and refining — not necessarily a problem at all.
As you gain experience supporting and guiding the work of others, challenges will grow in complexity and ambiguity. One consultant describes leadership development as moving outward in a series of concentric circles, with the most basic leadership activities at the center and the most challenging work of senior leadership and organizational strategy and development at the far outer rings. Continually seek challenges that move you beyond the known and comfortable areas into new and increasingly complex problems. 
Makes sense right? But, what if you don’t have strong leadership abilities? A lot of people think that you have to be born a leader but luckily science shows that’s not true. According to the University of Illinois, leadership is based 30% on genetics and 70% on acquired skills and experiences. This proves that the Law of the Lid is not fixed–your limits raise along with your personal development.

One Reply to ““how to be a great leader being leaders””

  1. Network. Networking is making connections with people who have connections. Contrary to popular belief, networking is mutually beneficial. You offer expertise, opinion, or opportunity to someone in exchange for something back.
    Focus on what you want to do, and take steps to get where you want to be. Learn the skills that are necessary for that job or position you want in your life. When people see your determination toward reaching your goals, they’ll reconsider.
    HBS professor Joe Badaracco agrees that the traditional manager versus leader argument (“Clark Kent versus Superman,” he jokes) tends to undermine the value of management. “There are lots of people who look and act like managers, who have excellent managerial skills, and who don’t make a lot of noise. Nobody is writing cover stories about them. But after they have been in an organization for a period of time, things are significantly better,” observes Badaracco. “Now, are these mere managers because we can’t compare them with Martin Luther King? Or are they leaders because they accomplished something that needed to be done?”
    Jump up ^ Forthcoming in “The Handbook for Teaching Leadership”, by Werner Erhard, Michael, C. Jensen, & Kari Granger; Scott Snook, Nitin Nohria, Rakesh Khurana (Editors) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1681682

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