“how to be leader individuals who find servant leadership a form of micromanagement”

“Act as if you are already the healthiest person you can be. Do not wait until you feel better about yourself or until you believe you have what it takes. As if you are self-actualized and your beliefs will follow suit. Act while you fear rather than waiting until you feel unafraid.” -David Richo, How To Be an Adult
Acting “as if” can be a playful game, where you toy with the balance of shedding off who you were or are, and instead don the costume of who you want to be. It may sound silly, but this is a powerful exercise for your mind.
By: Ransi Samarasinghe “Old is gold”, a long time back people could fight against germs and toxins with amazing natural remedies. Now a days all we do is spending money for collecting larger amount of toxins which have numerous side effects in order to cure diseases. There’s an ancient magical…
6. Be part of the team. There’s an acronym that says “team” stands for Together Everyone Achieves More, and great leadership comes from those who see themselves as part of a team, who are willing to roll up their sleeves and do what it takes to support, help, guide and mentor.
2. Develop your skills. If you don’t have the skills to lead, no title or position will ever make you into the leader you want to be. There’s only one way to become a better leader, and that’s to work on your leadership skills, develop expertise in your field, and discover the heart of what leadership is about for you.
Individuals with higher intelligence exhibit superior judgement, higher verbal skills (both written and oral), quicker learning and acquisition of knowledge, and are more likely to emerge as leaders.[68] Correlation between IQ and leadership emergence was found to be between .25 and .30.[79] However, groups generally prefer leaders that do not exceed intelligence prowess of average member by a wide margin, as they fear that high intelligence may be translated to differences in communication, trust, interests and values[80]
Further, a good leader will continually scan for things that are out of their control including changes in their operating environments. When they see a change in their environment that might stop them from achieving their results, they will quickly develop contingency plans to ensure that the things they cannot control do not stop them from meeting or exceeding their targets.
Once you’ve set the vision and engaged other people through communication, you need to lead the delivery. That’s where a clear understanding of the end goal, and metrics and evaluation to demonstrate outcomes, are important. It’s a good idea to stay ahead of the delivery curve, setting interim goals along the way which are stretching but attainable. Much of what I’ve just described in the last three points is encapsulated by Steve Radcliffe in the model he discussed at the Leadership Conference last year: future, engage, deliver.
Rising to the top of the corporate ladder is a dream for many, but it can be a reality for professionals who enhance their management skills, develop leadership qualities and hone their organizational abilities. Mastering these three areas can tip the scales for managers who want to advance in their careers.
Use the last example as a template; to become a great speaker, you need to improve voice presentation skills as these are the basic skills needed for a speaker. But if you are lacking speech writing or subject knowledge skills, you can try to outsource them to an expert. This is called working smart. Many great leaders don’t write their own speeches; they focus on delivering it right.
Noah is a master at helping people (and himself) get laser-focused on their goals. Pay special attention at 3:53 where he talks about the strategy that he learned from Mark Zuckerberg that has brought him success.
Sure, it’s easier to do just enough to get by. To do what you’re used to doing. But if you seek out opportunities to create phenomenal returns and ramp up the quality of your work, success will come easier than you think.
Knowing this, we’re going to want to reframe that “I want to be healthy” goal into something much mores specific and actionable such as, “I want to eat 3 healthy meals per week and go to the gym 2 times a week for 15 minutes.”
His radical management innovations have transformed Haier from a small, failing, state-owned refrigerator maker into the world’s largest appliance brand. He groups employees into small, self-managing teams that choose their own managers, compete for internal talent, and can earn big bonuses — unusual in the West and unheard-of in China.
Leadership means different things to different people around the world, and different things in different situations. For example, it could relate to community leadership, religious leadership, political leadership, and leadership of campaigning groups.
Leadership is the capacity to lead employees and companies through change. A leader must have the ability to cognitively reframe a company depending upon changing conditions, according to Haydn Shaughnessy, a contributor to Forbes magazine. Whether it is the ability to adapt to new technology or new economic challenges, a great leader is someone who can adjust to change quickly and with enthusiasm. In Shaughnessy’s 25 years in technology development, he has seen great leaders excel depending upon their ability to embrace change and learn new innovative ways of doing business.
Individuals with dominant personalities – they describe themselves as high in the desire to control their environment and influence other people, and are likely to express their opinions in a forceful way – are more likely to act as leaders in small-group situations.[76]
Leaders who rely on fear and power and intimidation aren’t so much leaders as bullies. True leaders are always nurturing and mentoring others on the team, which means letting them take the wheel sometimes. When you allow others to take the lead, you give them a chance to showcase their skills and talent, and you inspire your whole team to bring their best.
Boldness is both something you can develop and something that is blessed as a virtue. Although some people are naturally more fearless than others, practicing how to be fearless–or at least project fearlessness–is a completely doable task, one many have achieved in order to fulfill their role as an amazing leader.
Effectiveness in leadership has been attributed to (1) persuasion skills, (2) leadership styles and (3) personal attributes of the leader. We will explore these further in another article or two. Now, we will consider one critical element of leadership (influence) – love for people.
Next year marks the 70th anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi’s assassination. Known for his messages of truth, religious harmony and non-violence, he was murdered by Nathuram Godse, a member of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), the right wing advocate of Hindu nationalism, which is the fountainhead of India’s ruling party, the BJP under Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Many Indians remember Gandhi as a leader who had lived and died for the cause of Hindu-Muslim amity. He led a hunger strike on January 13, 1948 seeking to restore religious harmony in the country. Godse shot him 17 days later, because he thought Gandhi favoured the political demands of India’s Muslims during the partition of the Indian subcontinent in August 1947.
There’s no playbook for how to become an elite leader in basketball. Whether it’s John Wooden teaching his UCLA players the proper way to tie their shoes or Zen master (and new Knicks president) Phil Jackson referencing Buddha, the point is to get five players working in harmony — however you do it. Three active coaches with very different styles stand out. We’re hard-pressed to say which is best: Duke’s Coach K (above, right), who has developed players for decades with a mixture of toughness and love — in the process becoming the winningest Division I men’s college basketball coach in history and leading the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team to a pair of gold medals? Or the famously terse Coach Pop, who empowers his players by sometimes stepping back? “What do you want me to do?” he has challenged his stars in a time-out. “Figure it out.” And they do: Coach Pop has had more consecutive winning seasons (16) than any active NBA coach. Or Dawn Staley, who has led women’s teams at Temple and South Carolina to storied records? The former WNBA star initially didn’t want to coach. But as Staley noted at her induction into the National Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013, she knew she made the right decision when “I started to care more about my players than to win.” That might be the common trait of the great ones.
2. Talk less, listen more. When you first step up in front of the team, your instinct might be to do all the speaking in order to assert your role as pack leader. But one of the most vital managerial skills is encouraging dialogue. To get people talking, you need to listen; really listening means being receptive to other ideas and opinions. This will demonstrate your respect for each team member, and they’ll respect you in turn.
If you want your staff to do their best work, you need to give them the freedom to brainstorm and explore, Negrash said. Be open to your team’s ideas and suggestions, and be ready to consider them and possibly develop them further.
Be a good friend to your teammates. Though you should be respected first of all, being a team captain is more casual than being a boss, and you should make an effort to make friends so you can have fun while working hard.
Honest – Wise leaders are not afraid of communicating the truth to their people. Honesty is about being truthful, having integrity, and building trust. Honesty leads to better more productive relationships.
Leadership is more often than not about “soft skills” rather than hard skills. Yes, a leader who understands what drives the bottom line is valuable. Yet, it’s the leader who can get others to perform at their best who ultimately creates winning organizations.
Leaders must have the ability to act in an interpersonally competent manner, yet they also need to learn the techniques of good listening, honest and open communication, delegating, conflict resolution skills, etc., to actually get work done and keep the whole movement/organization/project together.
A new study from the University of Buffalo states that one of the most important leadership qualities found in highly successful individuals is the ability to lead by example. Leading by example encourages respect and loyalty from employees, and shows initiative on the part of their employer.
After General Francisco Franco’s death in 1975, tensions were high. The country had just emerged from nearly four decades of authoritarianism, and faced a number of possible futures—many of them bloody. Suárez, who had come from the right-wing Franco regime, could have tried to rule through intimidation and exclusion. Instead, he made it a priority to bring the left-wing leaders of the Communist and Socialist parties into the fold. Through negotiation, persuasion, and some very adroit coalition-building, he convinced those around him of the importance of democracy and pluralism, staving off a military coup and eventually creating the constitutional monarchy that exists today. At one point, Suárez convinced the parliament that was appointed under Franco—at that time, the “old elite”—to abolish itself to make way for elected parties. For scholars of leadership, it’s hard to imagine a better illustration of skill than that.
Collaborate. When the team is performing effectively, effective team leaders know when to get out of the way and hand over the remote control to the team. In this style of leadership, you will increasingly be collaborating as a first amongst equals in a web of mutual accountability.
Here’s an example story of poor leadership: An airline’s forks kept disappearing and no one knew why. After an investigation, it was discovered the dishwashers were throwing them away because they had trouble with adequately cleaning them and they were scared of punishment if they returned dirty forks (and would thusly be reprimanded).[1] If you’re too dictatorial, your team will throw away your forks. Better management would have prevented this problem. So be kind and keep your entire cutlery.

0 Replies to ““how to be leader individuals who find servant leadership a form of micromanagement””

  1. “I think a great leader is one who makes those around him/her better. There are many litmus tests for a great leader, but I really look to those around them,” said Dana Brownlee, founder of Professionalism Matters. “Are they growing, becoming better leaders themselves, motivated, etc.?”
    Jump up ^ Tagger, S.; Hackett, R.; Saha, S. (1999). “Leadership emergence in autonomous work teams: Antecedents and outcomes”. Personnel Psychology. 52 (4): 899–926. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.1999.tb00184.x.
    People with a fixed mindset think their intelligence or talents are pre-determined traits that cannot be changed. They also believe that talent alone leads to success — without hard work. But they’re wrong.

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