“how to become a successful manager a leader can be a better leader when:”

Even the most well-intentioned people around you may begin to disparage and discourage you from leaving the safety of the herd. Family, friends, and loved ones all may not understand your choice to go on a new path.
Business leaders have put themselves in a better position to being more effective by adapting to volatility and to the demands of the ever evolving styles of leadership. The good news is, business leadership effectiveness ranks higher at 31%, compared to the global average for all forms of leadership effectiveness, which stands at 24%. It is also higher when compared to other forms of leadership, according to the KLCM report.
Find a mentor. A mentor is someone, usually with a bit more experience than you, who knows the trade, offers advice, and helps you in your pursuit. Behind many successful people are mentors. Mentors get satisfaction out of knowing that their guidance has literally bred success.
There are different styles of leadership and they can (nearly) all be good. The important thing is to be yourself: know your own personality so that you can be authentic in the way you engage with other people and the way you your authority. Understand how you as an individual can best have positive impact and influence with others and try to understand how they perceive you. Always be clear in communicating your values, what you care about and what you stand for – through your behaviour as well as your words.
Charisma is certainly helpful, but it’s not essential. There have been many admired leaders in the human history who weren’t the friendliest, most charming of people in the bunch. What was important, however, was that people trusted them, and they were inspired by his or her vision. What you will need is good communication skills (whether it’s through speaking, writing, even art) so you can articulate your vision.
Employees, company stakeholders and the wider business community want their leaders to be “personally present”. As a result, the communications channels which a leader chooses to utilise have to reflect this in order for their communications to be effective.
Surround yourself with positive people. Make friends with people you admire for various reasons: because they are happy, kind, generous, successful at work, or successful in other ways. Join forces with those who have achieved things you want to achieve, or who are on their way to a common goal. Don’t let jealousy get in your way: nobody’s success is a threat to yours.[10]
This is far more complex than it actually sounds. Good communication skills are essential for a great leader. You may very well understand the cave of crazy that is your brain, but that doesn’t mean that you can adequately take the ideas out of it and explain them to someone else.
Once they have made up their mind, they don’t hesitate to commit–it’s all hands on deck. They show great consistency with their decisions, rarely backing out or changing their minds unless it is absolutely necessary. Being decisive shows commitment, a quality very high in demand for a great leader.
Functional leadership theory (Hackman & Walton, 1986; McGrath, 1962; Adair, 1988; Kouzes & Posner, 1995) is a particularly useful theory for addressing specific leader behaviors expected to contribute to organizational or unit effectiveness. This theory argues that the leader’s main job is to see that whatever is necessary to group needs is taken care of; thus, a leader can be said to have done their job well when they have contributed to group effectiveness and cohesion (Fleishman et al., 1991; Hackman & Wageman, 2005; Hackman & Walton, 1986). While functional leadership theory has most often been applied to team leadership (Zaccaro, Rittman, & Marks, 2001), it has also been effectively applied to broader organizational leadership as well (Zaccaro, 2001). In summarizing literature on functional leadership (see Kozlowski et al. (1996), Zaccaro et al. (2001), Hackman and Walton (1986), Hackman & Wageman (2005), Morgeson (2005)), Klein, Zeigert, Knight, and Xiao (2006) observed five broad functions a leader performs when promoting organization’s effectiveness. These functions include environmental monitoring, organizing subordinate activities, teaching and coaching subordinates, motivating others, and intervening actively in the group’s work.
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0 Replies to ““how to become a successful manager a leader can be a better leader when:””

  1. People are both your primary asset and leading responsibility. You could have all the domain expertise in the world, but if you don’t know how to motivate or organize those around you, don’t have the right overarching approach, all that brain power will never be put to good use.
    Leadership and management are different but complementary skills. Leadership revolves around influence, motivation, drive, and other unquantifiable skills. Here are nine traits many great leaders possess:
    Stepping into a new leadership role can be daunting. Anyone in this position for the first time faces huge challenges to convince their hiring managers they made the right choice. While it’s a time for celebration, some will be afraid how they’ll cope, and worry about how to lead staff effectively and convincingly.

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