“how you be how to be a better leader in the workplace”

Of course, as people move into more senior positions, their specific domain expertise tends to go down as they develop the ability to communicate across a broader set of company disciplines. Their soft skills actually improve. They begin to spend less time “in the trenches” and more time looking for overarching solutions—which is great. Which means, at this point that, assuming specific, deep domain expertise becomes slightly less of a priority, motivational and organization skills should increase respectively.
Occasionally, the leader is the person who is in charge, the founder of the business, the CEO, the president or department head. Leadership qualities combined with positional power magnify the ability of an individual to attract and retain the all-important followers.
I used to believe that even if I slacked off all day at work — scraping by, just doing the minimum to not get fired — I could switch gears from the lazy, unmotivated worker I was to a disciplined, creative entrepreneur when I got home.
Joshua was such a man. He was publicly appointed to succeed Moses (Num 27:12-23). The goal was to lead the Hebrews cross over the Jordan and take the land (Josh 1:1-2) … and that was he what he did. In his old age, there remained much land to be possessed. In Josh 24:15, Joshua summoned all Israel to gather at Shechem and challenged them to serve the Lord, putting before them his commitment …
None of the above assets will work for a leader if she can’t speak or write in a way to convince others that they should follow along, join the team, get on board. All the above gets to the old adage that a leader knows how to do the right thing and a manager knows how to do things right. But a leader has to be a manager, too. I don’t think these skills and abilities can be separated out very easily. Both need to be in the mix.
If you define “leader” (as we often do here in America) as someone in charge of a company, team, or political party, then the answer is, “No, not just anyone can become a leader.” But that’s circumscribing the definition of leader excessively, because in reality there are countless types of leaders in every circumstance imaginable.
One of the more recent definitions of leadership comes from Werner Erhard, Michael C. Jensen, Steve Zaffron, and Kari Granger who describe leadership as “an exercise in language that results in the realization of a future that wasn’t going to happen anyway, which future fulfills (or contributes to fulfilling) the concerns of the relevant parties…”. This definition ensures that leadership is talking about the future and includes the fundamental concerns of the relevant parties. This differs from relating to the relevant parties as “followers” and calling up an image of a single leader with others following. Rather, a future that fulfills on the fundamental concerns of the relevant parties indicates the future that wasn’t going to happen is not the “idea of the leader”, but rather is what emerges from digging deep to find the underlying concerns of those who are impacted by the leadership.[92]
“I look at leadership as an honor and a vocation,” he told Business News “If, in your heart, you feel leadership is your destiny and how you’ll make a difference in this world, then you are certainly starting from the right place.”
55. “Leadership is the ability to establish standards and manage a creative climate where people are self-motivated toward the mastery of long-term constructive goals, in a participatory environment of mutual respect, compatible with personal values.” –Mike Vance
Mastering success means learning to love being a small fish in a big pond. Most people don’t want to admit those three little words…“I don’t know.” Instead of choosing to learn, they reject the opportunity and instead go back to entertaining themselves.
Sure, it’s easier to do just enough to get by. To do what you’re used to doing. But if you seek out opportunities to create phenomenal returns and ramp up the quality of your work, success will come easier than you think.
Jump up ^ Larson, J. R. Jr.; Christensen, C.; Abbot, A. S.; Franz, T. M. (1996). “Diagnosing groups: Charting the flow of information in medical decision-making teams”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 71: 315–330. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.71.2.315.
Solve problems. People who are successful encourage progress by solving problems and answering questions. No matter where you are or what you’re doing, look around and try to think of ways you can contribute. What are people struggling with or complaining about? How can you make life easier for them in an effective way? Can you re-design or re-organize some aspect of the situation so things run more smoothly? Can you create a product or provide a service that fills a critical gap?
Ability to Motivate. Leaders don’t lead by telling people what they have to do. Instead, leaders cause people to want to help them. A key part of this is cultivating your own desire to help others. When others sense that you want to help them, they in turn want to help you.

0 Replies to ““how you be how to be a better leader in the workplace””

  1. • When you are leading your company into a “New Frontier,” because neither you nor your employees have been there before, mistakes, miscues, and inexperience add to the challenge, and your leadership is key to meeting that challenge.
    Comparable to the Roman tradition, the views of Confucianism on “right living” relate very much to the ideal of the (male) scholar-leader and his benevolent rule, buttressed by a tradition of filial piety.[9]
    Lose with dignity. Leaders should be seen as mature – not as crybabies. If the other team kicked your butt, congratulate them without wincing. With your good attitude, you’ll get another chance at them.
    Becoming a leader does not mean becoming someone you fundamentally are not. We all have our idea of what the “leader” straight from central casting looks and acts like, and while that type might be great for movies, it isn’t universal in the real world. Not even close. The “right” leader is right for the specific place, time, and situation in which he or she is placed, and not necessarily for all places, times, and situations. Someone may, for example, be the perfect person to lead a jury in a criminal or civil trial, while being completely wrong for leading a busy café during lunch hour, and vice versa.

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