“i want to be great become a better manager”

When you’re ready to hone your leadership skills, it makes sense to learn from a proven leader. Villanova University offers a highly respected Certificate in Organizational Leadership program. With Villanova’s 100% online courses and flexible, video-based e-learning platform, you can work to expand your skills and earn new credentials as your busy schedule allows.
Without followers, there are no leaders. Leaders therefore need skills in working with others on a one-to-one and group basis, and a range of tools in their armoury to deal with a wide range of situations. Many of these skills are also vital for managers, and you can find out more about these in our page on Management Skills.
Here’s something they’ll probably never teach you in business school: The single biggest decision you make in your job—bigger than all of the rest—is who you name manager. When you name the wrong person manager, nothing fixes that bad decision. Not compensation, not benefits—nothing.Gallup CEO Jim Clifton
Some great managers struggle with change and fail to be great leaders, while a great leader might fail to create a sense of stability in an organization and not measure up as a manager. HBS professor David Thomas points out that “increasingly, the people who are the most effective are those who essentially are both managers and leaders.”
We have two ears and one mouth for a reason. We have a tendency to talk about ourselves, but try to tone that down and give your colleague a chance to tell about themselves the next time you talk. Try that, and you will see the joy in their eyes! Let them speak about the things they care about and the things that worry them. This is a chance to know them better and establish a meaningful bond with them.
Concepts such as autogestion, employeeship, and common civic virtue, etc., challenge the fundamentally anti-democratic nature of the leadership principle by stressing individual responsibility and/or group authority in the workplace and elsewhere and by focusing on the skills and attitudes that a person needs in general rather than separating out “leadership” as the basis of a special class of individuals.
Lagarde became IMF chief in July 2011 as the European debt crisis grew most acute. Her unenviable task required juggling the concerns of 188 member countries while supporting IMF bailouts of Greece, Ireland, Portugal, and other troubled countries. She did so and is still doing so largely with success, though the IMF’s stringent conditions on aid have angered some. Lagarde combines her tough prescription of austerity with an argument that reforms will help the poor and unemployed above all — a balance that has increased acceptance of her message.
Sorry, that’s incorrect. It might sound trite, but life isn’t always fair. As hard as it may be, don’t waste time complaining about the unfairness of life. Instead, get out there and do something about it. Try again…
The first two – public and private leadership – are “outer” or behavioral levels. These are the behaviors that address what Scouller called “the four dimensions of leadership”. These dimensions are: (1) a shared, motivating group purpose; (2) action, progress and results; (3) collective unity or team spirit; (4) individual selection and motivation. Public leadership focuses on the 34 behaviors involved in influencing two or more people simultaneously. Private leadership covers the 14 behaviors needed to influence individuals one to one.
achieve – achieve success – achiever – also-ran – best bet – bestselling – big-time – blockbuster – blockbusting – blowout – boffo – breakout – brilliant success – bring home the bacon – clean getaway – do brilliantly – do well – do well for yourself – fire up – flourish – flourishing – fly high – get ahead – go a long way – go far – go gangbusters – go places – go to the dogs – golden couple – golden era – golden girl – good management – great success – have it made – high achiever – high note – high performer – high-flyer – high-flying – hit – hit show – hit the target – hot-shot – hotshot – make a go of it – make good – make it big – make something of yourself – market leader – number one
The authors name Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi as leaders, who have been able to lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and boost growth. They have realised the horizon new technologies and approaches open up – the Fourth Industrial Revolution – and capitalise on them to alleviate poverty (in India) and facilitate business dealing (in China). But Xi and Modi can’t really claim the credit by reaping the harvest for the seeds their predecessors had sown, even though the majority of their citizens are content with the “current economic condition.”
So, be careful how you use the terms, and don’t assume that people with “leader” in their job titles, people who describe themselves as “leaders,” or even groups called “leadership teams” are actually creating and delivering transformational change.
Nearly two decades ago Masiyiwa fought and won a key court battle to open Zimbabwe’s telecom industry to private investment. Masiyiwa, who sits on the Africa Progress Panel as well as the boards of Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa and the Rockefeller Foundation, is a persuasive advocate for development opportunities and the creation of strong government institutions. “He is truly one of Africa’s most influential figures, with his good counsel sought by world leaders and CEOs,” says Rockefeller Foundation president Judith Rodin, who calls him “a champion for the power of to improve the lives of millions.”
Great leaders are incapable of showing empathy for those whom they lead. Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela and Winston Churchill and Chairman Mao and so on would have lived a quiet life if they had empathised with the suffering that their leadership would cause their followers. Mandela and Churchill only became electable once they were in their dotage and no longer had the stomach for any great upheaval. Gandhi’s assassination, though mourned, was felt to be a good thing for the polity by no less a statesman as Dr. Ambedkar.
37. “Leadership is the process of persuasion or example by which an individual (or leadership team) induces a group to pursue objectives held by the leader or shared by the leader and his or her followers.”–John W. Gardner
People learn by doing, and letting staff work things out for themselves and make their own mistakes is part of growing as a person and an employee. Times may be tough and change may be complex to cope with, but if the boss wants maximum energy behind the mission then don’t wrap them in cotton wool and don’t let them hide behind processes. The “computer says no” culture is holding back many large organisations.
Be Authentic – If possible, try to stay in touch with your inner, real self. Recognizing both your talents and your shortcomings can be an important path to authenticity. When you’re aware of your strengths and weaknesses, and when you acknowledge what you don’t know, people are more likely to offer their help.
A good leader is unlikely to be aware of their uniqueness or the value that they bring to the organisation as they will be humble, however they will lead a team that performs at a level far higher than others in their industry, upto 202% higher. Outsiders will explain the success as luck or as being in the right place at the right time but there is a uniqueness to all great leaders.
Take an online course geared toward building your professional skills. For example, at my company MOGUL, we have the MOGUL Career Course, with resources and expert advice provided within that will help accelerate you into a stronger, more confident leader.
14.  “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” –John Kenneth Galbraith
“A leader needs to communicate in a way that makes people feel what they need to do. As a leader of a large group you have to keep in mind that people need to believe in you and know that you’re behind any given message. It’s not only what you say but truly what you feel and believe. This rule reminds all of us, and leaders in particular, that emotions are a powerful motivator — or, in some cases, a de-motivator. We’re social creatures who need interaction, and you use that to make points when they’re important enough. When you deliver a message face-to-face, it’s strikingly different than when you do some kind of mass communication. If we’re going to have impact as leaders, we have a responsibility to communicate directly, eyeball-to-eyeball, and with authenticity.”
Being passionate about your organisation is about looking beyond your strategy and seeing the value your organisation adds to the people outside of it, the customers who receive your organisations goods and services. It is about linking that value to each and every employee’s contribution whilst keeping a focus on those few things that lead to greater business success.
In any case, it’s always good to be reminded that life can be whatever we want it to be: “Do not make the mistake of believing that life holds no purpose for you. Remember that you are here only once. This is your life – right now! So make sure you live the life you were born to live.”

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