“leadership at work i aspire to be like you”

Mark van Vugt and Anjana Ahuja in Naturally Selected: The Evolutionary Science of Leadership present evidence of leadership in nonhuman animals, from ants and bees to baboons and chimpanzees. They suggest that leadership has a long evolutionary history and that the same mechanisms underpinning leadership in humans can be found in other social species, too.[103] Richard Wrangham and Dale Peterson, in Demonic Males: Apes and the Origins of Human Violence, present evidence that only humans and chimpanzees, among all the animals living on Earth, share a similar tendency for a cluster of behaviors: violence, territoriality, and competition for uniting behind the one chief male of the land.[104] This position is contentious. Many animals beyond apes are territorial, compete, exhibit violence, and have a social structure controlled by a dominant male (lions, wolves, etc.), suggesting Wrangham and Peterson’s evidence is not empirical. However, we must examine other species as well, including elephants (which are matriarchal and follow an alpha female), meerkats (who are likewise matriarchal), and many others.
Traditional leadership logic (leader-follower) says that organizations need a strong leader to take command and control over an organization in order for it to succeed. This model worked exceptionally well in the past, when workers were performing tasks that are more physical in nature like construction or building widgets on an assembly line.
See what happened? In less than 5 whys, we figured out how to begin solving this HUGE issue with just one step: taking the time to find a book. Now this person knows the first step to getting started with his investments.
The key is to always have an area of improvement that you’re working on, whether it’s boosting your team’s morale or making yourself a better communicator. This shows people that, just as you demand growth and results from them, you demand the same from yourself.
Great leaders know that when it comes to their company, work place or whatever situation they’re in, they need to take personal responsibility for failure. How can they expect employees to hold themselves accountable if they themselves don’t?
In any case, it’s always good to be reminded that life can be whatever we want it to be: “Do not make the mistake of believing that life holds no purpose for you. Remember that you are here only once. This is your life – right now! So make sure you live the life you were born to live.”
Use the last example as a template; to become a great speaker, you need to improve voice and presentation skills as these are the basic skills needed for a speaker. But if you are lacking speech writing or subject knowledge skills, you try to outsource them to an expert. This is called working smart. Many great leaders don’t write their own speeches; they focus on delivering it right.
Great leaders find the balance between business foresight, performance, and character. They have vision, courage, integrity, humility and focus along with the ability to plan strategically and catalyze cooperation amongst their team.
Leadership implies values. A leader must have values that are life-giving to society. It is the only kind of leadership we need. This then also implies values that are embedded in respect for others. So often we think of people skills or caring about people as being “warm and fuzzy.” I think a leader can be of varying ‘warmth and fuzziness,” but a leader has to respect others. You can’t lead without it. Otherwise we are back to manipulation. Respect means also that one can deal with diversity — a critical need for a leader in today’s world — probably always has been, although diversity may have been more subtle in the homogenous societies of the past.
“Leadership is the ability to see a problem and be the solution,” said Andrea Walker-Leidy, owner of Walker Publicity Consulting. “So many people are willing to talk about problems or can even empathize, but not many can see the problem or challenge and rise to it. It takes a leader to truly see a problem as a challenge and want to drive toward it.”
Some might say Hitler was a good leader as he lead millions of people to think in the same distorted way as he did but ultimately it was not the right direction for the German’s to go and he killed himself.
However, it’s also freeing at the same time. Once I actually said out loud that I wanted to become a New York Times bestselling author, it became crystal clear what I needed to do in order to achieve my goal. I focused all of my attention on those things.
In 2005 the self-made furniture exporter was elected mayor of Solo, a 500,000-person city in Indonesia. “Jokowi,” as he’s known, cleaned up the city and rooted out corruption, thrilling an Indonesian public weary of the status quo. His ascent since then has been swift: In 2012 he became governor of Jakarta. Now he’s the favorite for Indonesia’s July 2014 presidential election.
Good leaders want their entire company to succeed, including everyone involved. They take the time to understand every worker so they can help them achieve their personal goals in line with the company’s.
Courage is a great trait to have if you want to be successful. It will help you to develop the right mindset when it comes to reaching your goals and you won’t be afraid to try, even after you make a mistake.
The Dalai Lama, as a symbol of the unification of the state of Tibet, represents and practices Buddhist values. The Dalai Lama’s leadership is benevolent and aims toward truth and understanding, alongside the other Buddhist precepts. This is a great example for all leaders: if you want to give good directions to others, you have to get feedback from others to understand the situation properly.
If you’re practicing with members of your own team, offer them encouragement. Instead of showing off and being mean when they make a misstep, show them how to improve their game and compliment them when appropriate.
A toxic leader is someone who has responsibility over a group of people or an organization, and who abuses the leader–follower relationship by leaving the group or organization in a worse-off condition than when he/she joined it.
For example, Nalini Ambady, a researcher at Tufts University, shows that when people watch 30-second soundless clips of real physician-patient interactions, their judgments of the physician’s niceness predict whether or not that physician will be sued. So it doesn’t have to do so much with whether or not that physician was incompetent, but do we like that person and how they interacted?

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