“one leader working for the good of the people essay on leadership skills”

At the very foundation of the notion of leadership lies trust. Without it, no project or team dynamic could be optimal. Moreover, in an ideal conception of leadership, all of the aspects of trust are linked with each other: the leader must be a trustworthy person; he or she must be able to win others’ trust and help them develop their confidence.
First and foremost, great leaders care about their team’s development and with good reason! 65% of employees cite ‘training and development opportunities’ as one of their top three work motivators. Strong leaders tap into employees’ desire to learn by providing constant access to the right training that meets their personal and company needs. Creating a strong learning culture across your teams doesn’t only improve employees capabilities, it increases team motivation and engagement with the business mission.
Once they have made up their mind, they don’t hesitate to commit–it’s all hands on deck. They show great consistency with their decisions, rarely backing out or changing their minds unless it is absolutely necessary. Being decisive shows commitment, a quality very high in demand for a great leader.
A good leader is strategic with their thinking, they understand what result business is trying to achieve and how the business to achieve these results. They will ensure all of their decisions and actions are consistent with the vision.
[Focus on the objective (the Vision), not on leading.  The means can and should be developed collaboratively, though the team leader is the final arbiter.  You inspire others by engaging people justly, managing yourself, acting with integrity and passion]
They need to know why the organization is pursuing the current strategies. They need their leader for guidance and to help remove any barriers they may experience along the way. Mostly, they need the assurance that their leader has confidence in their ability to perform and produce the desired outcomes.
Victor Vroom, in collaboration with Phillip Yetton (1973)[44] and later with Arthur Jago (1988),[45] developed a taxonomy for describing leadership situations, which was used in a normative decision model where leadership styles were connected to situational variables, defining which approach was more suitable to which situation.[46] This approach was novel because it supported the idea that the same manager could rely on different group decision making approaches depending on the attributes of each situation. This model was later referred to as situational contingency theory.[47]
Further, leaders people follow are accountable and trustworthy. If progress towards accomplishing the goals ceases, the leader takes responsibility to analyze the problem—he doesn’t search for people to blame.
Consistent, frequent meetings like monthly one-on-ones are a great way to make sure you’re giving enough attention to everyone. It might seem like a lot of time spent, but employee development is your most important job.
Start “seeing” more than “doing.” As you have probably started gathering, being a leader is more of an innate quality than a series of actions. To lead a situation, you need to see it arising, see how you can help it, and see the path it’s going down. Let your team take care of the doing. You just gotta have a vision.
Jump up ^ Gershenoff, A. G.; Foti, R. J. (2003). “Leader emergence and gender roles in all-female groups: A contextual examination”. Small Group Research. 34 (2): 170–196. doi:10.1177/1046496402250429.
In contrast to the appointed head or chief of an administrative unit, a leader emerges within the context of the informal organization that underlies the formal structure. The informal organization expresses the personal objectives and goals of the individual membership. Their objectives goals may or may not coincide with those of the formal organization. The informal organization represents an extension of the social structures that generally characterize human life — the spontaneous emergence of groups and organizations as ends in themselves.
Leaders who demonstrate persistence, tenacity, determination, and synergistic communication skills will bring out the same qualities in their groups. Good leaders use their own inner mentors to energize their team and organizations and lead a team to achieve success.[100]
You must know your reasons for wanting to learn how to become successful and achieve your goals. This is the only way you can persevere when the going gets tough and achieve your goals. When things get challenging, reflect on what caused you to pursue this path in the first place. Were you conventionally successful but internally unhappy? Have you not utilized your skills as much as you would like to? Are you trying to become a more well-rounded individual? Whatever your reason for wanting to succeed, use these motivations as the cornerstone of your desire to work hard and achieve more.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *