“signs of a good leader be a great leader”

Create a team of leaders. Developing leaders across the team is developing a better team. The strongest teams are those in which more members inspire, support, challenge and hold each other accountable. Yet even in teams full of capable leaders you remain ultimately accountable. A leader’s work is never done.
The leader is at the service of the team, and not the other way around. Group members must have and feel the support of their leader, the tools needed to do their jobs properly must be available to them, they must have recognition for their efforts and know that there is a person paying attention in order to correct bad habits. That is all part of a leadership which serves the team, and not the opposite.
Interpersonal problems. Psychologists and marriage counselors help other people navigate the complex web of personal relationships that make up our lives. Can you help people better get along with one another?
Becoming a leader does not mean becoming someone you fundamentally are not. We all have our idea of what the “leader” straight from central casting looks and acts like, and while that type might be great for movies, it isn’t universal in the real world. Not even close. The “right” leader is right for the specific place, time, and situation in which he or she is placed, and not necessarily for all places, times, and situations. Someone may, for example, be the perfect person to lead a jury in a criminal or civil trial, while being completely wrong for leading a busy café during lunch hour, and vice versa.
Although some individuals are naturally strong communicators or strategic thinkers, leaders are mostly made and not born. Developing as a leader takes time and experience, and it usually involves making ample mistakes. Libraries are filled with books about leading, but the only way to truly learn to lead is to engage in doing so. ​Training programs, books and other materials can be valuable supporting tools, but learning to lead is a full contact activity.
High energy. Long hours and some travel are usually a prerequisite for leadership positions, especially as your company grows. Remaining alert and staying focused are two of the greatest obstacles you will have to face a leader.
Launching a new business is not easy. You have to give up the comforts of a stable paycheck to delve into the unknown, an unpredictable abyss. A lot of things keep us from making the leap—things like fear and insecurity. And one thing above all the rest: motivation.
Google’s (GOOG) employee No. 16 officially joined the company in 1999 as its first marketing manager, just a year after Larry Page and Sergey Brin set up their first office in her Menlo Park, Calif., garage. Widely admired within the Googleplex for her management style, Wojcicki was instrumental in guiding the evolution of the company’s hugely successful advertising and commerce platforms. Now, many expect Wojcicki, who took the helm of Google’s YouTube division in February, to rev up the troops there.
Some people can develop leadership skills through their everyday experiences. Moreover, some people do not hold any positions of authority or business titles, yet still demonstrate leadership through their actions and abilities to rally people to act on their visions for something better than the status quo.
After all, how often have you talked to a friend about working out, saving money, or studying for school and heard them say something like, “Yeah, I know I really should be doing that but…” followed by some lame-brained excuse as to why they’re putting off their self-development?
Be decisive. You’re standing in a circle of a group of friends, debating on what to do that night. Everyone is dilly-dallying, complaining, nixing everyone else’s ideas until one person finally steps up and says, “Guys, we’re doing this.” That person rose to the top, saw the situation needed direction, and took charge. Leader, leader, leader.
8. Be a mentor, not a preacher. People are interested in growth and development; they want to know how they can do better and find their own path. As a leader your job is to mentor them, guide them and support them–not to boss them or preach to them.
There is no task for being passionate about people, being passionate about people is a theme that is woven through every aspect of a leader’s role, it is evident in the way you start your day, give feedback, cascade strategy, manage performance, conduct one on ones, and run team meetings.
First and foremost, great leaders care about their team’s development and with good reason! 65% of employees cite ‘training and development opportunities’ as one of their top three work motivators. Strong leaders tap into employees’ desire to learn by providing constant access to the right training that meets their personal and company needs. Creating a strong learning culture across your teams doesn’t only improve employees capabilities, it increases team motivation and engagement with the business mission.

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