“there is no such thing as a “best” leadership style for all situations and employees. be a good manager”

This is similar to “the one who yells loudest gets heard.” Just because that person is loud certainly doesn’t mean they’re right. You don’t have to be going 90 mph (140 km/h) leaving a trail of rubble behind you to be a good leader. Actually, you shouldn’t be doing that. Your time should be spent interpreting, molding, and offering solutions.
The next requirement is the realization that the goal cannot be achieved alone, without the help of others. Is there a natural grouping of people from whom you can elicit help? Or do you have to recruit your followers? In the latter, you face a greater challenge. But whatever the situation, the leader must integrate his (or the organization’s) goal with his followers’ personal goals and then communicates this goal in such a way that they embrace it too and the goal becomes a common goal.
How you do one thing is how you do everything. If you spend all day being bored, lazy, and irresponsible, you can’t simply “flip a switch” and become a truly responsible, disciplined, hard worker while at home, in your relationships, your finances, or your health.
Educational institutions and leadership training programs are an important source of knowledge and skills that can lead to more effective leaders. Learning about the different types of leadership is important regardless of your career path.
A good leader acts strategically, they craft out a vision and refer constantly to their vision, in their communications and when giving feedback. They are firstly a good manager and they are focused on their people, surrounding themselves with good people.
Focus on your goals only, not comparing yourself to others. Everybody has their own advantages, disadvantages, and obstacles to overcome. Formulate a plan to achieve your own definition of success, and figure out the steps you need to take to get there (education, experience in a new job, investing, etc.), and begin taking the first steps to get there. Once you’re making progress toward your goal, no matter how small, you’ll be more driven by your own accomplishments and less worried about others.
Charles de Gaulle was born in Lille, France, in 1890. After he graduated from the elite military academy Saint-Cyr, he excelled as an infantry lieutenant World War I. During World War II, de Gaulle’s talent for transactional leadership helped him rise to the rank of brigadier general. He was serving as undersecretary for defense under Paul Reynaud when Reynaud was replaced by Philippe Pétain, who favored Nazi collaboration.
However, over the past several decades, we’ve seen a shift from physical-labor oriented jobs to thought and connection centered work. Today’s workers are not simply motivated the same way as their parents’ parents were. This is common knowledge, yet we insist on managing this new breed of workers as if they were still working on the factory floor.
See what happened? In less than 5 whys, we figured out how to begin solving this HUGE issue with just one step: taking the time to find a book. Now this person knows the first step to getting started with his investments.
As previously stated, leadership involves creating and articulating a vision and inspiring others to want to work toward that vision. But leaders may not be skilled at or involved with the day-to-day management of the work needed to turn that vision into a reality.
Jump up ^ Popper, Karl (2012) [1945]. “Preface to the First Edition”. The Open Society and Its Enemies (7 ed.). London: Routledge. p. xxxiii. ISBN 9781136749773. Retrieved 2017-08-20. […] if our civilisation is to survive, we must break with the habit of deference to great men. Great men may make great mistakes; and […] some of the greatest leaders of the past supported the perennial attack on freedom and reason. Their influence, too rarely challenged, continues to mislead […]
Mittal created the world’s largest steelmaker (MT) by pursuing a decades-long, impossibly audacious plan of consolidation — working with governments, powerful labor unions, and other constituencies to rewrite the rules of the old steel industry in tough times.
“The more you can contain your ego, the more realistic you are about your problems. You learn how to listen, admit that you don’t know all the answers. You exhibit the attitude that you can learn from anyone at any time. Your pride doesn’t get in the way of gathering the information you need to achieve the best results. It doesn’t keep you from sharing the credit that needs to be shared. Humility allows you to acknowledge your mistakes.” – Larry Bossidy
You need to understand just what the corporate objectives are. In other words, what is the organization producing and more importantly, what benefits will the product or services have for its customers. People prefer to have a global purpose; they would rather know that the actions they are performing each day will result in positive consequences.

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