“tips for successful empowerment works only when employees are given the proper training and resources to respond.”

Leadership is important to give a company direction. Without trust and respect you could be heading in the wrong direction. Leaders need to be open to suggestions and input from those involved and not close minded.
Leaders are hard to find. They exhibit a unique blend of charisma, vision and character traits that attract people to follow them. They exhibit the other nine characteristics around which this article series was developed as well. But, mostly, as they exhibit these traits and characteristics, people will want to follow them. 
A small Seattle coffee retailer has become 20,000 shops worldwide under Schultz’s leadership (SBUX), with many more planned. Crucially, he understood that he was creating an experience, not selling a product. Far ahead of most CEOs, he saw the value of offering medical insurance to all employees, even part-timers, and pursuing environmental and social projects that inspire employees and attract customers.
They communicate, not just the overall direction, but any information their followers need to successfully and skillfully carry out their responsibilities. They recognize that for their followers to perform most effectively they need to understand the big picture. They also know that their job is to remove barriers that may have a  negative impact on the employees’ success—not to micromanage how the employees accomplish their work.
Hard-working managers aspiring to get to the next level in their career can benefit from learning to transform management skills into leadership skills. Read on for tips to help you become a leader who inspires teams and impresses executives.
Most theories in the 20th century argued that great leaders were born, not made. Current studies have indicated that leadership is much more complex and cannot be boiled down to a few key traits of an individual. Years of observation and study have indicated that one such trait or a set of traits does not make an extraordinary leader. What scholars have been able to arrive at is that leadership traits of an individual do not change from situation to situation; such traits include intelligence, assertiveness, or physical attractiveness.[91] However, each key trait may be applied to situations differently, depending on the circumstances. The following summarizes the main leadership traits found in research by Jon P. Howell, business professor at New Mexico State University and author of the book Snapshots of Great Leadership.
When a company has a positive culture, employees are more motivated and confident in their work. It’s through supportive leaders that a company finds the most success. According to Richard Kissane, executive chairman of Premium Franchise Brands, leaders are responsible for setting the tone for their team and organization.
It doesn’t matter if you are running a business, managing a team, or teaching a class–leadership skills are important. Some people seem to be born knowing what to do to inspire and lead people, but for most of us it doesn’t come that naturally.
And finally we come to the last of the six qualities – responsibility. The ability to put up your hand and admit when you’ve done something wrong never comes easily. When there is blame to be accepted for a business error, the owner and leader must be the one to accept it. But responsibility also means being able to reward and congratulate your employees, and spreading accolades and appreciation where appropriate can go a long way. When a business owner is able to accept blame and pass on congratulations to those who truly deserve it, a leader is born.
18.  “I think leadership comes from integrity–that you do whatever you ask others to do. I think there are non-obvious ways to lead. Just by providing a good example as a parent, a friend, a neighbor makes it possible for other people to see better ways to do things. Leadership does not need to be a dramatic, fist in the air and trumpets blaring, activity.” –Scott Berkun
1. Manage your emotions. Your emotions give you energy. If they’re low, your energy is low; if they’re running high, you feel positive and optimistic. To be at your best as a leader, manage your emotions–when you do, you manage your energy too.
Cherish your time. Try to spend your free time doing things that you enjoy doing, rather than wasting time. For example, rather than spending your weekends watching television, spend them partaking in your hobbies or spending time with loved ones and new friends.
“Coaching allows leaders to make the connection and apply [changes] in a real-life setting,” Iorio said. “You need time to integrate, process and reflect, and unless you go through those steps, you won’t have sustainable change.” 
Make an effort to seek and obtain that which you consider will help you to be fulfilled. However, realize that objects do not make you happy, so seeking money as a means of happiness can only leave you feeling hollow. Instead, try to be peaceful by giving some time to yourself to have peace in mind. Try to go for outings so that you can have a change from routine life. Try to spend your time with good people who can become friends. Try to work hard to earn good money so that you can lead the life that you think will help you be fulfilled. If you don’t have, strive rather than feel deprived.
This is the essence of Angela Duckworth’s groundbreaking book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. In short, it is not the individual with the greatest starting position or motivation that usually wins — it’s the person who has the most “grit.” The person who can last the longest.
A good leader surrounds themselves with good people, they do not accept inferior performance, and while they coach and mentor to improve performance, they make the required tough decisions to resolve performance issue.
Strong communication skills are vital to effective leadership in today’s business world. By association, the areas that employees associate most with leadership also have strong communication elements. These include owning up to making mistakes, encouraging the most productive versions of the employees that they lead and handling crises well by remaining calm.
In the late 1940s and early 1950s, a series of qualitative reviews of these studies (e.g., Bird, 1940;[14] Stogdill, 1948;[15] Mann, 1959[16]) prompted researchers to take a drastically different view of the driving forces behind leadership. In reviewing the extant literature, Stogdill and Mann found that while some traits were common across a number of studies, the overall evidence suggested that persons who are leaders in one situation may not necessarily be leaders in other situations. Subsequently, leadership was no longer characterized as an enduring individual trait, as situational approaches (see alternative leadership theories below) posited that individuals can be effective in certain situations, but not others. The focus then shifted away from traits of leaders to an investigation of the leader behaviors that were effective. This approach dominated much of the leadership theory and research for the next few decades
Leadership is both a research area and a practical skill encompassing the ability of an individual or organization to “lead” or guide other individuals, teams, or entire organizations.[citation needed] Specialist literature debates various viewpoints, contrasting Eastern and Western approaches to leadership, and also (within the West) US vs. European approaches. US academic environments define leadership as “a process of social influence in which a person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task”.[1][2] Leadership seen from a European and non-academic perspective encompasses a view of a leader who can be moved not only by communitarian goals but also by the search for personal power.[citation needed] Leadership can derive from a combination of several factors.[citation needed]
Management is a hard skill that is often defined as the science of quantifying a project by evaluating the skills within an organization. Managers create budgets, determine the and subtasks required to meet a goal, keep a project on schedule, and myriad other quantifiable skills.
In the business world, ego is praised too often. We applaud the strong-arm approach. We celebrate the “hard-won battle.” But the truth is, ego rarely gets you anywhere. It comes with a sour taste, it leaves ill feelings in your wake, and it ends up burning bridges that could have otherwise stood the test of time.

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