“what a leader should be best quality of a leader”

A number of works in the 19th century – when the traditional authority of monarchs, lords and bishops had begun to wane – explored the trait theory at length: note especially the writings of Thomas Carlyle and of Francis Galton, whose works have prompted decades of research. In Heroes and Hero Worship (1841), Carlyle identified the talents, skills, and physical characteristics of men who rose to power. Galton’s Hereditary Genius (1869) examined leadership qualities in the families of powerful men. After showing that the numbers of eminent relatives dropped off when his focus moved from first-degree to second-degree relatives, Galton concluded that leadership was inherited. In other words, leaders were born, not developed. Both of these notable works lent great initial support for the notion that leadership is rooted in characteristics of a leader.
As head coach and general manager of the Green Bay Packers from 1959 to 1968, Vince Lombardi used situational leadership strategies to lead the once-beleaguered football team to victories that included two consecutive Super Bowl championships. Lombardi was one of the first football coaches to use game film as a tool for improvement (and opposition research). His thorough approach to game analysis, ability to motivate players, and talent for designing plays that maximized his team’s strengths and minimized their weaknesses made him one of the great leaders in professional football.
We live in an age of ‘Big Data’ & burgeoning Artificial Intelligence. It may well be that ‘Expert Systems’ will increasingly take leadership roles- i.e. their actions will solve coordination and concurrency problems. Our hearts may misgive us, but our brains may see this is as a good thing. Compassion- as Ethical theorists and Behavioral Psychologists are increasingly finding- may be counterproductive. It may paralyse rather than catalyse needful policy decisions.
Developing leadership qualities requires debunking several misconceptions about leadership too. For example, many people think they can’t be leaders since they’re not in a position of authority. But at the most fundamental level, people have authority over their own values, actions, and decisions, and should honor that authority appropriately. Many people think introverts can’t be great leaders, but would anyone have labeled Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks as an extrovert?
15. Stop micromanaging. Leaders who micromanage their teams are not allowing the talented to excel, the gifted to produce, and the experienced to make best use of their skills. If you want to be a better leader, step back and give people the room they need to do their best.
Show your commitment to your team’s betterment. For your organization to grow, everyone has to get better. This has nothing to do with just you being great — you have to make your team great. Ideally, when the task is done the team will say, “We did it!”, not you exclaiming, “I did it!” It’s about the whole of the group, not the one.
Admit your mistakes. You aren’t perfect, and occasionally showing that you could have planned something differently will show that you are only human and will make people respect you more. Of course, you can avoid always admitting that you’ve made a mistake, because you want to look like you know what the heck doing.
Leadership may mean different things to different people, but in a business, leadership must always start with the owner, who has to define exactly what leadership means to him or her, and then decide what success means to the business. However, being a leader also means articulating that vision to everyone else in the company, convincing them of its importance, and encouraging and motivating them to work together to achieve it. And while doing so may come more naturally to some than to others, it’s never easy. In fact, as Vince Lombardi, the legendary Green Bay Packers coach, once said, “Contrary to the opinion of many people, leaders are not born. Leaders are made, and they are made by effort and hard work.”
Set a timeline for when you want to achieve your objective. If you don’t know when you will achieve your objective by, then it’s hard to know whether you have failed. Give yourself a timeline that is difficult but doable. Winning a Tour de France from scratch in two years is not reasonable, but booking a comedy gig in front of at least 20 paying customers probably is.
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