“what is leaders what does leader do”

When employees are given the opportunity to exercise ownership over their work, and use their brains to make decisions on their own, their competency and confidence increase. In turn, leaders empower their people to become leaders themselves. In highly effective organizations, there are leaders at every level, not just at the top. The solution is always to push authority down so you’re creating a leader-leader culture, not a leader-follower culture.
John Gardner is quoted to have said, “Most importantly, leaders can conceive and articulate goals that lift out of their petty preoccupations and unite them in pursuit of objectives worthy of their best efforts.” Let that be you.
Adams, who sold Elite Daily to the Daily Mail in 2015 for 50 million dollars, knows a little about keeping an open mind. He says, “Learn from those who do things differently than you, not the ones around you doing the same things. And when you are on the journey, make sure you appreciate those who don’t give up on you.”
So what can you do embrace these valued leadership qualities and become a stronger and more effective leader? Transformational leaders are usually described as enthusiastic, passionate, genuine and energetic. These leaders are not just concerned about helping the group achieve its goals; they also care about helping each member of the group reach his or her full potential. 
In-group members are perceived by the leader as being more experienced, competent, and willing to assume responsibility than other followers. The leader begins to rely on these individuals to help with especially challenging tasks. If the follower responds well, the leader rewards him/her with extra coaching, favorable job assignments, and developmental experiences. If the follower shows high commitment and effort followed by additional rewards, both parties develop mutual trust, influence, and support of one another. Research shows the in-group members usually receive higher performance evaluations from the leader, higher satisfaction, and faster promotions than out-group members.[61] In-group members are also likely to build stronger bonds with their leaders by sharing the same social backgrounds and interests.
In every strategic planning session that I have conducted for large and small corporations, the first value that all the gathered executives agree upon for their company is integrity. They all agree on the importance of complete honesty in everything they do, both internally and externally.
Josh Meyer, of the men’s skincare and grooming company Brickell Men’s Products, knows this to be true. “Being successful doesn’t just happen. I’ve always wanted to be successful and my curiosity drove me to find out how other people became successful, causing me to take actionable steps that have helped me get where I am today. You absolutely need to be curious.”
Some might say vulnerability is too touchy-feely and inappropriate for business. Others may say they’re just not wired for it — it’s not in their personality makeup. Neither is true. Vulnerability is about trust — the backbone of successful leadership. Employees and leaders who trust one another learn to be comfortable being open to one another around their failures, weaknesses, even fears. Vulnerability-based trust is predicated on the simple–and practical idea — that people who aren’t afraid to admit the truth are not going to engage in the kind of political drama that sucks away everyone’s time and energy and, more important, gets in the way of accomplishing goals and results.
The world is full of leadership programs, but the best way to learn how to lead might be right under your nose. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.
Don’t let failure define you. When asked about his 10,000 failed attempts to develop a storage battery, the prolific American inventor Thomas Edison responded: “I have not failed, I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”[3]
Steve Jobs co-founded Apple Computer with Steve Wozniak in 1976. Apple became known for making intuitive, compact personal computers with the debut of the Macintosh in 1984. In the decades that followed, Jobs’s innovative leadership, including his ability to see potential in new technologies, resulted in his investment in Pixar Animation Studios, creation of iTunes for digital music, and production of products, including the iMac, iPod and iPhone. Known as an uncompromising CEO who demanded innovative design and marketing work from his employees, Jobs helped revolutionize digital and personal technology.
Jump up ^ Businessballs management information website – Leadership Theories page, “Integrated Psychological Approach” section: http://www.businessballs.com/leadership-theories.htm#integrated-psychological-leadership

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *