“what it takes to be a great leader what to do to be successful”

The question of what makes a good leader—in other words, what are leadership skills—is widely debated. It is clear that the ability to lead effectively relies on a number of key skills, but also that different leaders have very different characteristics and styles.
Writing in Forbes magazine, Erika Andersen, author of Leading So People Will Follow, says, like most things – leadership capability falls along a bell curve. So the fact is that most folks who start out with a modicum of innate leadership capability can actually become very good, even great leaders (Are Leaders Born or Made?)
Who says leadership is a one-way relationship? As you work toward developing some of these leadership qualities, don’t forget to look to your followers for feedback and inspiration. Pay attention to the things that have been effective in the past and always be on the lookout for new ways to inspire, motivate and reward group members.
Great leaders are incapable of showing empathy for those whom they lead. Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela and Winston Churchill and Chairman Mao and so on would have lived a quiet life if they had empathised with the suffering that their leadership would cause their followers. Mandela and Churchill only became electable once they were in their dotage and no longer had the stomach for any great upheaval. Gandhi’s assassination, though mourned, was felt to be a good thing for the polity by no less a statesman as Dr. Ambedkar.
Running the military’s technology innovation lab in the middle of the austerity era is no easy task. But Prabhakar, who first led a major federal office when she was only 34 and later spent time as a venture capitalist, is meeting the challenge with an outsider’s enthusiasm. Key Beltway stakeholders are taking notice. Says Thomas Mahnken, a defense expert at Johns Hopkins University: “She’s very a Student Club or Organization – if there isn’t a club you aren’t interested in joining, why not start a new one? You can be the president. You will learn how to handle a group of people to accomplish certain goals or tasks.
• When you are leading your company into a “New Frontier,” because neither you nor your employees have been there before, mistakes, miscues, and inexperience add to the challenge, and your leadership is key to meeting that challenge.
Last but certainly not the least, is empathy. Leaders should develop empathy with their followers. Unfortunately, most leaders follow a dictatorial style and neglect empathy altogether. Due to this, they fail to make a closer connection with their followers. Understanding the problems of your followers and feeling their pain is the first step to become an effective leader. Even that is not enough until you work hard and provide your followers with the suitable solution to their problems.
Groom Your Successors – Developing a new generation of leaders is essential to your success. You can’t climb higher if there is no one to take your place – so don’t be afraid to delegate responsibilities and groom your successors. Giving up control is a sign of a confident leader.
While Peter Economy has spent the better part of two decades of his life slugging it out mano a mano in the management trenches, he is now a full-time ghostwriter and best-selling author of more than 100 books — including Managing for Dummies, Everything I Learned About Life I Learned in Dance Class, and User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build the Right Product — with total sales in excess of two million copies. He has also served as associate editor for Leader to Leader for more than 12 years, where he has worked on projects with the likes of Jim Collins, Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and many other top management and leadership thinkers. Visit him anytime at petereconomy.com.
It really is lonely at the top, which is reason enough not to isolate yourself, but access and accountability benefit your team at every level. Great leaders understand the value of connection with others and spend time with their team on a regular basis.
Acting “as if” can be a playful game, where you toy with the balance of shedding off who you were or are, and instead don the costume of who you want to be. It may sound silly, but this is a powerful exercise for your mind.
“Arrogant or critical people are often people with low self-esteem who are afraid of taking risks. That’s because if you learn something new, then you are required to make mistakes in order to fully understand what you have learned.” -Robert Kiyosaki, Rich Dad Poor Dad
Leadership is more often than not about “soft skills” rather than hard skills. Yes, a leader who understands what drives the bottom line is valuable. Yet, it’s the leader who can get others to perform at their best who ultimately creates winning organizations.
Be persistent. You’re going to fail — that much is a given. Never hesitate to be a failure, since life gives many chances. What will define you is how you pick yourself up after you’ve fallen. Don’t give up. If your first attempt didn’t work, don’t quit.
One of the most common misunderstandings of leadership is that it’s about acquiring power. The best leaders use whatever power they have–and their time and energy–to collaborate with others. Position yourself as a leader who is there to support the success of those around you. You’ll find that when they succeed, you succeed.
The lesson, says Nohria, is that Churchill and other great leaders are pragmatists who can deal with difficult realities but still have the optimism and courage to act. “Enduring setbacks while maintaining the ability to show others the way to go forward is a true test of leadership,” he asserts.
PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY. Don’t expect other people to believe in you, don’t expect your friends to get behind you or your family to support you. If they do, great! But if they don’t, you can’t go around blaming them for your failures.
Avoid making important decisions, such as letting your daughter go to a slumber party at a new friend’s house, without your significant other. If he or she doesn’t agree with your choice, then he or she will look like the bad guy.
Before you appoint a leader, or go out looking for one, make sure you have a clear understanding of what it is you want them to achieve. Make sure they have the qualities and characteristics of a good leader, and whether or not they are a good fit with the team they will be leading.
(function(){“use strict”;function s(t){return”function”==typeof t||”object”==typeof t&&null!==t}function c(t){return”function”==typeof t}function a(t){z=t}function u(t){Q=t}function l(){return function(){setTimeout(f,1)}}function f(){for(var t=0;t=0&&c>=0&&{top:n,bottom:r,left:i,right:o,width:s,height:c}}function u(t){var e=
t.getBoundingClientRect();if(e)return e.width&&e.height||(e={top:e.top,right:e.right,bottom:e.bottom,left:e.left,width:e.right-e.left,height:e.bottom-e.top}),e}function l(){return{top:0,bottom:0,left:0,right:0,width:0,height:0}}if(!(“IntersectionObserver”in t&&”IntersectionObserverEntry”in t&&”intersectionRatio”in t.IntersectionObserverEntry.prototype)){var f=e.documentElement,h=[];r.prototype.THROTTLE_TIMEOUT=100,r.prototype.POLL_INTERVAL=null,r.prototype.observe=function(t){if(!this._observationTargets.some(function(e){return e.element==t})){if(!t||1!=t.nodeType)throw new Error(“target must be an Element”);this._registerInstance(),this._observationTargets.push({element:t,entry:null}),this._monitorIntersections()}},r.prototype.unobserve=function(t){this._observationTargets=this._observationTargets.filter(function(e){return e.element!=t}),this._observationTargets.length||(this._unmonitorIntersections(),this._unregisterInstance())},r.prototype.disconnect=function(){this._observationTargets=[],this._unmonitorIntersections(),this._unregisterInstance()},r.prototype.takeRecords=function(){var t=this._queuedEntries.slice();return this._queuedEntries=[],t},r.prototype._initThresholds=function(t){var e=t||[0];return Array.isArray(e)||(e=[e]),e.sort().filter(function(t,e,n){if(“number”!=typeof t||isNaN(t)||t<0||t>1)throw new Error(“threshold must be a number between 0 and 1 inclusively”);return t!==n[e-1]})},r.prototype._parseRootMargin=function(t){var e=t||”0px”,n=e.split(/\s+/).map(function(t){var e=/^(-?\d*\.?\d+)(px|%)$/.exec(t);if(!e)throw new Error(“rootMargin must be specified in pixels or percent”);return{value:parseFloat(e[1]),unit:e[2]}});return n[1]=n[1]||n[0],n[2]=n[2]||n[0],n[3]=n[3]||n[1],n},r.prototype._monitorIntersections=function(){this._monitoringIntersections||(this._monitoringIntersections=!0,this._checkForIntersections(),this.POLL_INTERVAL?this._monitoringInterval=setInterval(this._checkForIntersections,this.POLL_INTERVAL):(s(t,”resize”,this._checkForIntersections,!0),s(e,”scroll”,this._checkForIntersections,!0),”MutationObserver”in t&&(this._domObserver=new MutationObserver(this._checkForIntersections),this._domObserver.observe(e,{attributes:!0,childList:!0,characterData:!0,subtree:!0}))))},r.prototype._unmonitorIntersections=function(){this._monitoringIntersections&&(this._monitoringIntersections=!1,clearInterval(this._monitoringInterval),this._monitoringInterval=null,c(t,”resize”,this._checkForIntersections,!0),c(e,”scroll”,this._checkForIntersections,!0),this._domObserver&&(this._domObserver.disconnect(),this._domObserver=null))},r.prototype._checkForIntersections=function(){var t=this._rootIsInDom(),e=t?this._getRootRect():l();this._observationTargets.forEach(function(r){var o=r.element,s=u(o),c=this._rootContainsTarget(o),a=r.entry,l=t&&c&&this._computeTargetAndRootIntersection(o,e),f=r.entry=new n({time:i(),target:o,boundingClientRect:s,rootBounds:e,intersectionRect:l});t&&c?this._hasCrossedThreshold(a,f)&&this._queuedEntries.push(f):a&&a.isIntersecting&&this._queuedEntries.push(f)},this),this._queuedEntries.length&&this._callback(this.takeRecords(),this)},r.prototype._computeTargetAndRootIntersection=function(e,n){if(“none”!=t.getComputedStyle(e).display){return a(n,u(e))}},r.prototype._getRootRect=function(){var t;if(this.root)t=u(this.root);else{var n=e.documentElement,r=e.body;t={top:0,left:0,right:n.clientWidth||r.clientWidth,width:n.clientWidth||r.clientWidth,bottom:n.clientHeight||r.clientHeight,height:n.clientHeight||r.clientHeight}}return this._expandRectByRootMargin(t)},r.prototype._expandRectByRootMargin=function(t){var e=this._rootMarginValues.map(function(e,n){return”px”==e.unit?e.value:e.value*(n%2?t.width:t.height)/100}),n={top:t.top-e[0],right:t.right+e[1],bottom:t.bottom+e[2],left:t.left-e[3]};return n.width=n.right-n.left,n.height=n.bottom-n.top,n},r.prototype._hasCrossedThreshold=function(t,e){var n=t&&t.isIntersecting?t.intersectionRatio||0:-1,r=e.isIntersecting?e.intersectionRatio||0:-1;if(n!==r)for(var i=0;in.length)&&(e=n.length),e-=t.length;var r=n.indexOf(t,e);return-1!==r&&r===e}),String.prototype.startsWith||(String.prototype.startsWith=function(t,e){return e=e||0,this.substr(e,t.length)===t}),String.prototype.trim||(String.prototype.trim=function(){return this.replace(/^[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+|[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+$/g,””)}),String.prototype.includes||(String.prototype.includes=function(t,e){“use strict”;return”number”!=typeof e&&(e=0),!(e+t.length>this.length)&&-1!==this.indexOf(t,e)})},”./shared/require-shim.js”:function(t,e,n){var r=function(t){if(!r.hasModule(t)){var e=new Error(‘Cannot find module “‘+t+'”‘);throw e.code=”MODULE_NOT_FOUND”,e}return n(“./”+t+”.js”)};r.loadChunk=function(t){return”main”==t?n.e(“main”).then(function(t){n(“./main.js”)}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe):”dev”==t?Promise.all([n.e(“main”),n.e(“dev”)]).then(function(t){n(“./dev.js”)}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe):”internal”==t?Promise.all([n.e(“main”),n.e(“internal”),n.e(“qtext2”),n.e(“dev”)]).then(function(t){n(“./internal.js”)}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe):”ads_manager”==t?Promise.all([n.e(“main”),n.e(“ads_manager”)]).then(function(t){undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe):”content_widgets”==t?Promise.all([n.e(“main”),n.e(“content_widgets”)]).then(function(t){n(“./content_widgets.iframe.js”)}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe):void 0},r.whenReady=function(t,e){Promise.all(window.webpackChunks.map(function(t){return r.loadChunk(t)})).then(function(){e()})},r.prefetchAll=function(){var t=n(“./settings.js”);Promise.all([n.e(“main”),n.e(“qtext2”)]).then(function(){}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe),t.useCloudJwPlayer||n.e(“jwplayer”).then(function(){}.bind(null,n))[“catch”](n.oe)},r.hasModule=function(t){return n.m.hasOwnProperty(“./”+t+”.js”)},r.execAll=function(){var t=Object.keys(n.m);try{for(var e=0;e=l?e():document.fonts.load(u(o,'”‘+o.family+'”‘),c).then(function(e){1<=e.length?t():setTimeout(n,25)},function(){e()})}n()});var y=new Promise(function(t,e){a=setTimeout(e,l)});Promise.race([y,m]).then(function(){clearTimeout(a),t(o)},function(){e(o)})}else n(function(){function n(){var e;(e=-1!=g&&-1!=w||-1!=g&&-1!=v||-1!=w&&-1!=v)&&((e=g!=w&&g!=v&&w!=v)||(null===f&&(e=/AppleWebKit\/([0-9]+)(?:\.([0-9]+))/.exec(window.navigator.userAgent),f=!!e&&(536>parseInt(e[1],10)||536===parseInt(e[1],10)&&11>=parseInt(e[2],10))),e=f&&(g==b&&w==b&&v==b||g==_&&w==_&&v==_||g==x&&w==x&&v==x)),e=!e),e&&(null!==T.parentNode&&T.parentNode.removeChild(T),clearTimeout(a),t(o))}function h(){if((new Date).getTime()-d>=l)null!==T.parentNode&&T.parentNode.removeChild(T),e(o);else{var t=document.hidden;!0!==t&&void 0!==t||(g=p.a.offsetWidth,w=m.a.offsetWidth,v=y.a.offsetWidth,n()),a=setTimeout(h,50)}}var p=new r(c),m=new r(c),y=new r(c),g=-1,w=-1,v=-1,b=-1,_=-1,x=-1,T=document.createElement(“div”);T.dir=”ltr”,i(p,u(o,”sans-serif”)),i(m,u(o,”serif”)),i(y,u(o,”monospace”)),T.appendChild(p.a),T.appendChild(m.a),T.appendChild(y.a),document.body.appendChild(T),b=p.a.offsetWidth,_=m.a.offsetWidth,x=y.a.offsetWidth,h(),s(p,function(t){g=t,n()}),i(p,u(o,'”‘+o.family+'”,sans-serif’)),s(m,function(t){w=t,n()}),i(m,u(o,'”‘+o.family+'”,serif’)),s(y,function(t){v=t,n()}),i(y,u(o,'”‘+o.family+'”,monospace’))})})},void 0!==t?t.exports=c:(window.FontFaceObserver=c,window.FontFaceObserver.prototype.load=c.prototype.load)}()},”./third_party/tracekit.js”:function(t,e){/**
The first two – public and private leadership – are “outer” or behavioral levels. These are the behaviors that address what Scouller called “the four dimensions of leadership”. These dimensions are: (1) a shared, motivating group purpose; (2) action, progress and results; (3) collective unity or team spirit; (4) individual selection and motivation. Public leadership focuses on the 34 behaviors involved in influencing two or more people simultaneously. Private leadership covers the 14 behaviors needed to influence individuals one to one.
Picture this – one employee walks into a room and in an upbeat tone of voice you say “thanks for joining us.” Another employee walks into the room 20 minutes late and you say in a regular tone “thanks for joining us.”
14.  “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership.” –John Kenneth Galbraith
In contrast to individual leadership, some organizations have adopted group leadership. In this so-called shared leadership, more than one person provides direction to the group as a whole. It is furthermore characterized by shared responsibility, cooperation and mutual influence among the team members.[98] Some organizations have taken this approach in hopes of increasing creativity, reducing costs, or downsizing. Others may see the traditional leadership of a boss as costing too much in team performance. In some situations, the team members best able to handle any given phase of the project become the temporary leaders. Additionally, as each team member has the opportunity to experience the elevated level of empowerment, it energizes staff and feeds the cycle of success.[99]
What’s particularly helpful here is when leaders have expert power  . People admire and believe in these leaders because they are expert in what they do. They have credibility, and they’ve earned the right to ask people to listen to them and follow them. This makes it much easier for these leaders to motivate and inspire the people they lead.
In leadership, people and relationships are more important than tasks. Tasks do matter, but the main role of a good leader is to motivate and inspire other people to do the tasks well. You need to know how to delegate and be the leader of other leaders. The leader is the conductor of the orchestra, not the first violin. But you also need to know when to step in and take responsibility. Don’t be afraid to say ‘stop’ or ‘no’ if you think things are going wrong. And don’t let other people push you into a decision which you are not comfortable with.
Whatever the case, you’re probably wondering how you develop leadership skills on the fly. Sure, you probably have a rough idea of the basics from watching your manager (and her manager). But, doing it effectively requires finesse and complex knowledge.
It’s not about winning a popularity contest. You don’t have to be liked to be respected. It’s about serving and influencing others regardless of their job title in the effort to achieve a certain goal. More than anything, it’s about creating harmony in an environment where people want to work together.
According to some, leadership is determined by distinctive dispositional characteristics present at birth (e.g., extraversion; intelligence; ingenuity). However, according to Forsyth (2009) there is evidence to show that leadership also develops through hard work and careful observation.[108] Thus, effective leadership can result from nature (i.e., innate talents) as well as nurture (i.e., acquired skills).
No matter who you are, it’s always helpful when you have someone to look up to who is experienced with strong leadership capabilities. It makes it a lot easier to see someone perform in action than living by words on paper.
7. Give credit where it’s due. It’s not uncommon to see someone in a leadership position take credit for the work of others, but true leaders are generous with credit. They know that any great accomplishment takes many people and talents.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *