“what makes a good manager fire nation leader”

It’s better to be respected than loved. As human beings, we have a natural tendency to want to be loved. But what happens when your desire to be loved interferes with your ability to lead? Effective leaders recognize it is more important to be respected by their people than adored. They make the tough decisions that are needed to secure the future of those around them, including their direct reports.

In the business world, ego is praised too often. We applaud the strong-arm approach. We celebrate the “hard-won battle.” But the truth is, ego rarely gets you anywhere. It comes with a sour taste, it leaves ill feelings in your wake, and it ends up burning bridges that could have otherwise stood the test of time.

If you’re ready to overcome your fear of speaking and start leading more effectively, just take the first step and the rest will become history. You can get started right now by signing up for a spot in my free webinar, 4 Steps to a 6-Figure Speaking Career.

Dave Kerpen is the New York Times bestselling author of two books, Likeable Social Media and Likeable Business. If you like this post, please share it and please click the FOLLOW button above or below for more great posts from Dave.

Based on a leadership foundation of declared philosophy, purpose, values, beliefs, strengths, and vision, character-based leadership requires an intentional shift in setting an example from the inside out. And that takes a large dose of both resiliency and courage. Let’s explore these notions further.

Relationship-oriented leadership is a contrasting style in which the leader is more focused on the relationships amongst the group and is generally more concerned with the overall well-being and satisfaction of group members.[89] Relationship-oriented leaders emphasize communication within the group, show trust and confidence in group members, and show appreciation for work done.

Just like how the University of Illinois reported that 70% of leadership skills are acquired, Maxwell believes that leaders must be constantly engaged in a learning process in order to remain relevant and effective.

In recent years, considerable evidence has emerged that the organisations and groups tend to permit and actively encourage each member of the group or organisation to take the lead at the appropriate point. Organisations and families with particularly controlling leaders, by contrast, tend to be fairly dysfunctional.

Lead, don’t follow. Leading the way can be dangerous. You’re taking on the headwinds literally, perhaps, or you’re banking on an idea — like Facebook or Google — that someone has already tried before. Summon up the courage to do something different.

Take everything from steps 1 and 2 and write it all down — your guilt, each of the whys you asked, and how you can solve everything. This will help you get a clear understanding of how your mind works when it comes to guilt and problem solving.

But when you find a way to serve a million people, many other benefits follow. Word of mouth is hugely magnified. The feedback you receive is exponentially greater–and so are your opportunities to improve your products and services. You get to hire more employees and benefit from their experience, their skills, and their overall awesomeness.

As Pathfinders, leaders are expected to continually change or renew that part of the organisation for which they are responsible, working on ways to make things better, more effective, or different. Pathfinding calls for taking followers to a place they would not go by themselves.

Bosses may consider themselves to be an “expert in everything” and may think of themselves as the only person able to deliver a solution to the entire team. A leader may facilitate brainstorming and encourage their team to ask smart questions. They may be more inclined than a boss to make a decision based on discussions they’ve had with their team. A leader may say what they think needs to be done, but the team members may help decide how it’s actually executed.

Learn from your failures. Each failure is an opportunity to learn. If you make a mistake and refuse to learn, odds are you’ll make that same mistake sometime down the line. If you make a mistake and learn from it, you won’t waste your time making the same mistake again.

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