“what makes a good team leader which of the following statements is most likely true of leaders?”

You can not handle bad people. You need to focus on what you want and walk away from them. You can also talk to them and let them know that you are there, but your success comes before anything. Just remember that and just stay focused.

The introvert’s even temper creates a peaceful atmosphere that engenders trust and safety for those around them. Trust, in turn, helps us do business more effectively. Staying stable and calm in all situations—cultivating equanimity and composure—are the hallmarks of introverts. These attitudes can radiate to others in the workplace, and especially to customers. We can all sense when we enter a business if employees are on edge, which has a detrimental effect on our customer relation experience. If the operative word is calm, the introverts among us can teach us a thing or two.

Don’t change your instructions in the middle of a project. Though some adjustments in the workplace are necessary, it’s important to not only be clear about your expectations, but to also be consistent. If you change your mind about what you want halfway through a meeting, your employees may not take you seriously, or they might be frustrated.

Good leaders develop productive teams, efficient systems and a positive corporate culture. But good leadership doesn’t just happen. Good leaders possess positive personal characteristics, such as integrity, dedication, vision, a sense of fairness and creativity. And good leaders know how to inspire the best in others by being good listeners and motivators. Although many leadership qualities are innate, born into a person, other qualities can be learned.

Apart from the 14 other companies he has founded, Diamandis presides over X Prize Foundation, which hosts $10 million competitions to solve global problems. “He has an infectious optimism, which becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy,” says futurist Ray Kurzweil. He makes “each person understand that their role is critical to the success of their organization and in turn that the overall project is critical to transforming the world.”

The fourth necessary characteristic is the combination of humility and presence. Acting aloof, or above your employees, does not make a leader. Leaders have to be able to talk and listen to their employees on all levels of the company. At the same time, they must have the respect of their employees, the kind of respect that’s earned by being honest, having integrity, and being tough but fair.

“I think a great leader is one who makes those around him/her better. There are many litmus tests for a great leader, but I really look to those around them,” said Dana Brownlee, founder of Professionalism Matters. “Are they growing, becoming better leaders themselves, motivated, etc.?”

That’s how you open up. Pour out all you got from inside you. Give all you have ideas, thoughts, plans. Feel the vulnerability and learn to like it. When you pour all your ideas out you will need new ones. Where do new ideas come from? From critics who want to tear you down, from well-meaning supporters and from people you least expect.

The flip side of believing you’re working on something which will change/save the world is that it may inspire fanatical belief in the leader himself. Another potential flaw is its heavily context-dependent, in another word, the goal at the end. With a constant focus on making the world a better place, team members can sometimes lose focus on their day-to-day plan they need to execute.

When you realize that you feel guilty about something — like not hitting the gym or saving up for retirement — I want you to just take a moment and acknowledge the feeling. Recognize your guilt and ask yourself what is making you feel guilty. That leads us to…

Different situations call for different leadership styles. In an emergency when there is little time to converge on an agreement and where a designated authority has significantly more experience or expertise than the rest of the team, an autocratic leadership style may be most effective; however, in a highly motivated and aligned team with a homogeneous level of expertise, a more democratic or Laissez-faire style may be more effective. The style adopted should be the one that most effectively achieves the objectives of the group while balancing the interests of its individual members.[87] A field in which leadership style has gained strong attention is that of military science, recently expressing a holistic and integrated view of leadership, including how a leader’s physical presence determines how others perceive that leader. The factors of physical presence are military bearing, physical fitness, confidence, and resilience. The leader’s intellectual capacity helps to conceptualize solutions and acquire knowledge to do the job. A leader’s conceptual abilities apply agility, judgment, innovation, interpersonal tact, and domain knowledge. Domain knowledge for leaders encompasses tactical and technical knowledge as well as cultural and geopolitical awareness.[88]

If you go into business and make a lot of money, you’re successful. If you play tennis and finish the season with more wins than losses, you’ve been successful. If you have a successful pregnancy, you give birth to a healthy baby. Successful is one of those words that covers a great deal of ground; it generally applies to anything, anyone or any venture that ends well. When you see the word successful, think “Winning!”

Some might say Hitler was a good leader as he lead millions of people to think in the same distorted way as he did but ultimately it was not the right direction for the German’s to go and he killed himself.

A good boss also recognizes the importance of regular feedback. Acknowledge team members when they have successfully navigated an issue, and talk about what they did right. As you might expect, employees will enjoy the recognition and feel even more confident handling similar situations in the future.

Break your goal into small steps. Does the goal of starting a technology company seem impossibly unattainable? Break it down into smaller goals. Focus on streamlining your idea; then focus on getting funding; then move onto building a prototype, etc. If you have the vision to attack your goal piece by piece, it’s easier and less daunting to execute.

A 2006 Servant Leadership study, conducted by Jane T. Waddell of Regent University, suggests that some of the virtues of servant leadership that we all admire are also attributes that are more likely to be found in those who have a preference for introversion. One of these virtues is humility. Servant leadership is characterized by a primary desire to be of service to others and to empower followers to grow. Servant leaders believe their company goals are best achieved by developing the potential of their workers. They’re not self-seeking and interested in grabbing the limelight. On the contrary, they want to shine the light on others in the pursuit of a greater purpose: the success of their organizations, projects or ventures.

Other examples include modern technology deployments of small/medium-sized IT teams into client plant sites. Leadership of these teams requires hands on experience and a lead-by-example attitude to empower team members to make well thought out and concise decisions independent of executive management and/or home base decision makers. Zachary Hansen was an early adopter of Scrum/Kanban branch development methodologies during the mid 90’s to alleviate the dependency that field teams had on trunk based development. This method of just-in-time action oriented development and deployment allowed remote plant sites to deploy up-to-date software patches frequently and without dependency on core team deployment schedules satisfying the clients need to rapidly patch production environment bugs as needed.[121]

Pace-setting leader: With this style, you could charge ahead with your idea, but your team is still struggling, they may not fully understand it. So while you have an idea that solves the problem, their low morale means you have to micromanage them to get them ready. You run out of time.

A visionary leader, though, does need lieutenants who can take their vision and translate it into day-to-day work for the rest of the organization. If it’s all vision and strategy with no tie to day-to-day execution, employees will get confused and ultimately leave.

A leader is someone who has influence over a group of people. This can be an executive, a pop star or an employee who has the ability to influence coworkers’ thoughts, feelings, beliefs and actions. A leader does not necessarily have a specific title. You can tell a leader by his influence over others.

Although research has indicated that group members’ dependence on group leaders can lead to reduced self-reliance and overall group strength,[108] most people actually prefer to be led than to be without a leader (Berkowitz, 1953).[118] This “need for a leader” becomes especially strong in troubled groups that are experiencing some sort of conflict. Group members tend to be more contented and productive when they have a leader to guide them. Although individuals filling leadership roles can be a direct source of resentment for followers, most people appreciate the contributions that leaders make to their groups and consequently welcome the guidance of a leader (Stewart & Manz, To be an effective leader, one must listen to what those around you are saying, and then make a decision on what you have heard. To listen is very difficult, but one must, because the lowest of the low person in your business may say something that is effective and very important, something that you would never have thought of. So… learn to listen carefully, and when everyone has had their say, only then make a decision.

Learning doesn’t stop once you make the C-suite! Whatever someone’s title, be it L&D officer, manager, CEO or Superhero-in-Disguise – there’s always more to learn. So, make sure managers have access to the leadership training they need to develop their own skills. This way they will be best positioned to support their team’s growth and unleash other’s potential. Give your managers the power to lead by example!

The second characteristic is being able to communicate. Some leaders are great orators, but speaking well isn’t all that’s required of a leader. As we all know, there are lots of people who talk a great game but deliver nothing. Leaders who communicate well are those who not only share their thoughts with employees, but also let their strength and personal character show through in their communication, and empower those who work for them by defining the company’s goal and showing how to get there.

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