“what makes a good worker act leadership”

However, across those thousands of books and articles, among the countless legends and stories, you’ll find some common themes woven throughout. You’ll find principles about us as human beings that many of us think about but never try hard enough to achieve. You’ll hear about ideals and decisions that we all wish we could aspire to but often fail to understand. Here are ten of those things you’ll find among the tales of those who achieved success in business (and in life) – which ones do you currently have and which do you need to obtain?

Brown’s core argument is exactly what his title suggests: despite a worldwide fixation on strength as a positive quality, strong leaders—those who concentrate power and decision-making in their own hands—are not necessarily good leaders. On the contrary, Brown argues that the leaders who make the biggest difference in office, and change millions of lives for the better, are the ones who collaborate, delegate, and negotiate—the ones who recognize that no one person can or should have all the answers.

Don’t compare your own life to other peoples’ lives. Unfortunately, many people measure their own success by comparing it to the success of those around them. If you want to feel accomplished and happy, you will have to value your life for its own sake.

Look at what the numbers are telling you. Did you ever have an idea about something but were afraid that the numbers (i.e. metrics) wouldn’t back it up? That fear is normal, but it’s a good idea to let the numbers give you guidance. Better to be wrong and adapt than to stubbornly insist you’re doing it right when the numbers don’t back that up.

Another crucial element of great leadership is “brain” that is synonymous with intellect or “canniness.” It is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff, and “make smart decisions in a complex and rapidly changing world.”

If you are compassionate, and you look to understand the other person before you react, they will inherently believe they can trust you. They will feel safe in expressing their feelings, knowing that you won’t leap to judgments–and instead, you will help them figure out how to navigate the situation.

Motivate: There may not be a more important leadership trait than being a good motivator. When you can inspire, you can transform your team into a well-oiled machine. Raw talent is nice but when a team is motivated they can be unstoppable.

If want to study more in one day, follow a schedule of 1 hour and 40 minutes for study, 5 min for quick revision and 15 min to relax. For next hour, change the subject. Like this, you can achieve 6 to 8 hours study continuously.

Even more interesting, was that more than half of the people surveyed who agreed with the statement “I feel I can approach my manager with any type of question” were considered actively engaged in their work, showing that there might be a link between a manager being open and employee engagement.

Kishore Mahbubani, Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, is the co-author with Jeffery Sng of The ASEAN Miracle: A Catalyst for Peace. He was selected as one of Prospect magazine’s top 50 world thinkers in 2014.

To create a vision, leaders focus on an organization’s strengths by using tools such as Porter’s Five Forces  , PEST Analysis  , USP Analysis  , Core Competence Analysis  and SWOT Analysis  to analyze their current situation. They think about how their industry is likely to evolve, and how their competitors are likely to behave. They look at how they can innovate successfully  , and shape their businesses and their strategies to succeed in future marketplaces. And they test their visions with appropriate market research, and assessing key risks using techniques such as Scenario Analysis  .

That’s why it’s crucial to leverage the strengths of your team. This means finding each employee’s strengths, trusting their expertise and making the most of their abilities. Find out what they’re passionate about and help them lead a project, if they show leadership ability. Empower them to succeed with meaningful work that supports the company’s goals and objectives.

Sure, it feels good to be needed and step in to save the day, but solving every problem is not the way to do it. When you involve yourself too frequently, you rob your employees of their sense of engagement and personal accountability—which is actually a key source of motivation (and happiness). Part of being a leader is providing an environment in which your team can think independently and solve problems for themselves.

Howard Gillman is the chancellor of UC Irvine. You might have heard of how the university rescinded a bunch of acceptances, and then changed its mind.3 This past spring, an unusually high number of accepted students decided to matriculate; the school initially responded by rescinding offers over things like missed deadlines. But the college realized this was a mistake and reversed its decision. Gillman and the university accepted responsibility and decided to move past their earlier bad decision.

The best leaders walk the walk and talk the talk. As a result, group members admire these leaders and work to emulate these behaviors. If you want to become a better leader, work on modeling the qualities that you would like to see in your team members.

Democratic leadership is good for boosting team morale and improving relationships between leaders and members. An open environment encourages a constant stream of communication and idea exchange. For example, the idea of Gmail was brought to Google decision-makers by a lower-ranking staffer, as was the idea of AdWords. AdWords is a huge revenue driver for Google and it didn’t necessarily begin at the absolute top ranks, but the top ranks weren’t threatened when a new idea came about.

Are you a business leader just because you run a small business? No. But you need to learn how to be a business leader because without business leadership, your small business ship will circle aimlessly and eventually run out of power.

Identify the things/skills/material needed to achieve your objectives. If you want to be a famous speaker, for example, you need a broad vocabulary, subject knowledge, speech writing, voice clarity, and presentation skills. This is identifying short term objectives to achieve long term goals.

It’s important to manage your energy. Leaders are constantly on display and under scrutiny. You need to have energy in reserve so that you can manage your mood and the image you project, and have something in the tank when crises happen (as they inevitably will). Learn to recognise when you are tired or stressed, and how that makes you behave. Watch out for the signs. Learn also to recognise where your positive energy comes from and what takes it away.

Establish expectations for chores. Your children should know what work is expected of them, whether it is to wash their own dishes, help set the table, or do yard work. Rotating chores can also help mix things up and to ensure that no one member of your household is stuck with the unpleasant tasks, such as cleaning your kitty’s litter, every time.

From introverts, we can derive inspiration to free ourselves from an egotistic approach and instead devote our full attention to strengthening subordinates as a way to build a solid footing for a thriving business. It takes humility to do this, but humility pays.  

“I think fundamentally leadership is a species of courage,” says Missouri-bred Greitens, a former Navy SEAL and a Rhodes Scholar. “A lot of people approach leadership from a different perspective, but for me a true leader is someone who confronts fear, embraces pain, and welcomes suffering. It’s on the frontline of hardship, pain, and difficulty that leaders really make a difference.” In 2007, Greitens took his commitment back to the frontlines, founding a nonprofit organization that serves post-9/11 veterans by deploying them to service projects across the country. It’s about providing them with “a challenge, not charity,” he says — and changing the way Americans, and the veterans themselves, think about veterans.

Leaders motivate team members through goal establishment, coaching, feedback and by providing ongoing developmental support. Although money is a component of why everyone works, other intangible factors like rewarding work and the presence of opportunities for professional development are powerful motivators, always assuming that compensation is fair. Effective leaders are constantly on the lookout for ways to tap into the drive and passion of their employees. 

One Reply to ““what makes a good worker act leadership””

  1. You will not live long enough to figure it all out for yourself. And what a waste it would be to try, when you can learn from others who have gone before. Ben Franklin once said, “Men can either buy their wisdom or they can borrow it from others. The great tragedy is that most men prefer to buy it, to pay full price in terms of time and treasure.”

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