“what makes a good worker how to be a great manager and leader”

5. Excellent persuasion abilities. People have to believe in you and your credibility. Image is everything and the belief people have in you, your product, your mission, your facts or your reputation are key to being a great leader. You have to persuade people of this — it doesn’t just happen.
“Great leaders are aware of their own style and make the effort to learn how their style actually comes across to their team. They learn to flex their leadership style to individual team members so that they communicate and behave in ways that motivate and inspire.”
Being passionate about your organisation is about looking beyond your strategy and seeing the value your organisation adds to the people outside of it, the customers who receive your organisations goods and services. It is about linking that value to each and every employee’s contribution whilst keeping a focus on those few things that lead to greater business success.
They think about where they are going rather than where they have been. They maintain a positive attitude and think about the opportunities of tomorrow rather than focusing on the problems of the past.
In Google’s Project Oxygen referenced above, they also found three traits of lower performing managers. These are the things that Google now works with those managers to improve on and avoid in the future.
Great leaders with excellent management skills encourage input and change, and the best way to measure them is based on feedback they get from their best people. People usually give the best scores to leaders you trust and to leaders who listen.
None of the old theories successfully address the challenge of developing “leadership presence”; that certain “something” in leaders that commands attention, inspires people, wins their trust and makes followers want to work with them.
The old adage, “Do as I say, not as I do” is crap. It might have worked on you when you were 6 years old, but it will not work on a team of adults. They might not let you know explicitly, but they will be unhappy, eventually leave, and this will cut into your product. It may not have immediate repercussions, but eventually, any hypocrisy on your part will catch up with you.
By all accounts, Steve Jobs was a very mercurial genius who early in his career routinely yelled at employees, co-workers, partners, and vendors. According to some ex-employees of Apple and NeXT, he was intolerant of anything he viewed as failure and his foul-mouthed tirades were the stuff of legend.
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“Making your mark on the world is hard. If it were easy, everybody would do it. But it’s not. It takes patience, it takes and it comes with plenty of failure along the way. The real test is not whether you avoid this failure, because you won’t. It’s whether you let it harden or shame you into inaction, or whether you learn from it; whether you choose to persevere.”[10]
“It’s fascinating how differently the same business can perform with two different leaders. We look first for intellectual honesty. It drives me crazy when you meet with management and there are real issues and they act like they aren’t there. Also important is a contrarian bent, a confidence to go against the prevailing trend. You generally don’t want people who are saying this is what we should do because this is what others are doing. You want people who are spending when others are not, and taking chips off the table when everybody else is putting them on.”

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