“which statement regarding the duties of leaders and managers is best? why you want to be a leader”

The MAS Codes of Conduct for Management Practice will help managers to create the context in which staff thrive, are engaged with their organisation, are energised to contribute, derive personal and professional fulfilment and perform at their optimum.

Think about going to a new restaurant (the restaurant is life). You get a waiter that greets with you a smile and outlines the flavors of three of their best dishes, guarantees your satisfaction and tells you he’ll personally whip up something else if you don’t like it. Somewhere in your head, you are breathing a sigh of relief thinking, “Ahh. Yes. This will be a relaxing night — I’m in good hands.” That’s what everyone wants in life (in most restaurants, too).

Take calculated risks. Step out of your comfort zone. Successful people think big and act big. Don’t wait for opportunities to fall in your lap. Sniff them out. Successful people make big investments (in their careers, in their businesses, in their education) and all investments involve risk. Study your risks, make sure the odds are in your favor, and take a leap. Be bold. Three calculated risks to consider:

Transformational leaders also provide inspirational motivation to encourage their followers to get into action. Of course, being inspirational isn’t always easy. Fortunately, you don’t need motivational speeches to rouse your group members.

1. Lead by example. Any attempt to rule with an iron fist will go down like a lead balloon – after all, your coworkers don’t report to you. The best way to motivate your colleagues is to set the example of how you expect others to approach the project. If you’re enthusiastic, they’ll be enthusiastic. If you snipe and make snide remarks, so will they. Even if you’re inwardly grumbling about the extra pressure and workload, avoid complaining around your teammates.

Indeed, millions of people who are currently working with and though others to achieve objectives are already leaders. Whether they think of themselves as leaders (not to mention whether they are fantastic or disastrous leaders) is another issue.

Step 2: Make them care. You need to establish rapport as quickly as possible. If you can, name drop someone you have in common with them. In most cases though, you’ll need to establish common ground another way.

Jump up ^ Baumeister, R. F.; Senders, P. S.; Chesner, S. C.; Tice, D. M. (1988). “Who’s in charge here? Group leaders do lend help in emergencies”. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 14: 17–22. doi:10.1177/0146167288141002.

Without followers, there are no leaders. Leaders therefore need skills in working with others on a one-to-one and group basis, and a range of tools in their armoury to deal with a wide range of situations. Many of these skills are also vital for managers, and you can find out more about these in our page on Management Skills.

“Real leadership is when everyone else feels in charge,” Bono tells Fortune. And he has lived by this maxim. He helped persuade global leaders to write off debt owed by the poorest countries and encouraged the Bush administration and others to vastly increase AIDS relief. Now, through his ONE and (RED) campaigns, he is enlisting major companies and millions of people to combat AIDS, poverty, and preventable diseases.

On the other hand, in volatile, fast-paced times, people yearn for some form of constancy. They won’t find it in the marketplace; they won’t find it in most organisations. So where should they look for it?

Leadership is more often than not about “soft skills” rather than hard skills. Yes, a leader who understands what drives the bottom line is valuable. Yet, it’s the leader who can get others to perform at their best who ultimately creates winning organizations.

GreatSchools.org talked to several San Francisco public school principals who illustrate these qualities. The principals spoke about leadership and how they meet the real-life challenges of their jobs.

Leaders also need to be able to make good decisions in support of their strategy delivery, and solve problems. With a positive attitude, problems can become opportunities and learning experiences, and a leader can gain much information from a problem addressed.

People also struggle with the concept of how being a leader is different from being a manager. You may have heard the idea that ‘leaders do the right thing, and managers do things right’. This is a fairly delicate distinction, and many leaders are also managers (and vice versa). Perhaps the key difference is that leaders are expected to create and communicate a compelling vision, often associated with change. Managers, on the other hand, are perhaps more often associated with the status quo.

A boss may tell their team what they are going to do and how it is to be done, but a leader paints a vision that is larger than any single person. This vision may inspires the team to work together to achieve a goal that perhaps no one could do on their own.

2. Talk less, listen more. When you first step up in front of the team, your instinct might be to do all the speaking in order to assert your role as pack leader. But one of the most vital managerial skills is encouraging dialogue. To get people talking, you need to listen; really listening means being receptive to other ideas and opinions. This will demonstrate your respect for each team member, and they’ll respect you in turn.

As times have changed, so has the role of a leader. Today’s leader is focused on identifying and developing talent while laboring to create a healthy environment that allows individuals to apply their talents and skills in pursuit of key objectives. Creating this effective work environment requires that the leader focus on instilling and reinforcing key values, on modeling proper behaviors, and on instilling a sense of accountability to help teams and work groups succeed with their tasks.

Follow me.” If you’re the boss, you can get away with this attitude to a certain degree, but the followers you attract will be compulsory and not following you by choice. They will heed your advice and obey your commands, but it is involuntary followership based on your organizational hierarchy to a large degree.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *