“why do i want to be a leader these things you will do and greater”

A particular danger in these situations is that people or organizations that are being managed by such an individual or group think they’re being led; but they’re not. There may actually be no leadership at all, with no one setting a vision and no one being inspired. This can cause serious problems in the long term.
Sorry, that’s incorrect. It might sound trite, but life isn’t always fair. As hard as it may be, don’t waste time complaining about the unfairness of life. Instead, get out there and do something about it. Try again…
Execute your small objectives, focusing on your main objective. Don’t find reasons to procrastinate. Jump headfirst into the challenge and start chipping away. You never know what problems will present themselves before you step into the arena.
There is, in fact, no one right way to lead in all circumstances, and one of the main characteristics of good leaders is their flexibility and ability to adapt to changing circumstances. Leadership skills are highly sought after by employers as they involve dealing with people in such a way as to motivate, enthuse and build respect.
Jump up ^ Zaccaro, S. J.; & Banks, D. J. (2001). “Leadership, vision, and organizational effectiveness”. In S. J. Zaccaro and R. J. Klimoski (Editors), The Nature of Organizational Leadership: Understanding the Performance Imperatives Confronting Today’s Leaders. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Nobody likes dealing with drama. But sometimes it’s necessary to keep small problems from growing into something overwhelming. Leaders must be able to address dysfunction in their team with consistent policies and a strong stand expressed calmly and confidently.
7. Develop your leadership chops. Some people are born leaders, but most of us have to learn it the hard way. The best way to hone your managerial skills is to be a manager via on-the-job training. Other approaches are to emulate the qualities of authority figures you admire and read books and articles on the subject. You can find information on proper ways to delegate, how to manage creative people and much more on the TCG Blog.
Just like how the University of Illinois reported that 70% of leadership skills are acquired, Maxwell believes that leaders must be constantly engaged in a learning process in order to remain relevant and effective.
“Research clearly shows that transformational leaders—leaders who are positive, inspiring, and who empower and develop followers—are better leaders,” explains psychologist and leadership expert Ronald E. Riggio. “They are more valued by followers and have higher performing teams.”
Not only do leaders have a clear vision, they also communicate it so their followers understand the big picture. It can be as simple as giving progress updates and reminders about the importance of your goals or as elaborate as team workshops to immerse everyone in your mission. As a leader it is your responsibility to decide what method of communication works best and implement it.
Personality theories of leadership identify five major leadership qualities, called the Big Five: conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism, openness and extroversion, according to Michelle C. Bligh in “Personality Theories of Leadership.” However, according to Bligh, more specific research findings indicate that intelligence, self-confidence, determination, sociability and integrity are more consistent characteristics of a good leader.
The danger of this kind of thinking is obvious when you consider some of the examples Brown features: Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, and Mao. Though their stories are notorious, it’s well worth reading Brown’s insightful analysis of each man’s rise and reign.
Functional leadership theory (Hackman & Walton, 1986; McGrath, 1962; Adair, 1988; Kouzes & Posner, 1995) is a particularly useful theory for addressing specific leader behaviors expected to contribute to organizational or unit effectiveness. This theory argues that the leader’s main job is to see that whatever is necessary to group needs is taken care of; thus, a leader can be said to have done their job well when they have contributed to group effectiveness and cohesion (Fleishman et al., 1991; Hackman & Wageman, 2005; Hackman & Walton, 1986). While functional leadership theory has most often been applied to team leadership (Zaccaro, Rittman, & Marks, 2001), it has also been effectively applied to broader organizational leadership as well (Zaccaro, 2001). In summarizing literature on functional leadership (see Kozlowski et al. (1996), Zaccaro et al. (2001), Hackman and Walton (1986), Hackman & Wageman (2005), Morgeson (2005)), Klein, Zeigert, Knight, and Xiao (2006) observed five broad functions a leader performs when promoting organization’s effectiveness. These functions include environmental monitoring, organizing subordinate activities, teaching and coaching subordinates, motivating others, and intervening actively in the group’s work.
You cannot do everything, right. It is important for a leader to focus on key responsibilities while leaving the rest to others. By that, I mean empowering your followers and delegating tasks to them. If you continue to micromanage your subordinates, it will develop a lack of trust and more importantly, you will not be able to focus on important matters, as you should be. Delegate tasks to your subordinates and see how they perform. Provide them with all the resources and support they need to achieve the objective and give them a chance to bear the responsibility.
An integral part of keeping promises is knowing what’s doable and what’s not. If you can define between the two, the only other obstacle is being Practice this with your kids, practice this with your teammates, and practice this at every opportunity. Developing a strong moral code removes room for those questioning your ability to lead and hold power.
Trust other people to do their job. It’s hard to be successful if you don’t trust the people around you. You’re constantly micro-managing everything, leaving yourself spread thin and the others miffed about you not giving them a chance. Being successful is partly about assembling an able team around you. If you can’t trust others enough to let them do their job, you probably won’t succeed at that.
Jump up ^ Tagger, S.; Hackett, R.; Saha, S. (1999). “Leadership emergence in autonomous work teams: Antecedents and outcomes”. Personnel Psychology. 52 (4): 899–926. doi:10.1111/j.1744-6570.1999.tb00184.x.

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