“why leader you re the leader”

This technique comes from a Japanese industrialist named Sakichi Toyoda. He developed the method in order to find solutions at the root of recurring issues related to his manufacturing plant and helped blow up his company into a household name — you might have heard of it: Toyota Motors.

What most people do: Wing it. They make a list of the reasons why they should get a raise — why they DESERVE it — and then they practice what they’re going to say in their heads a few times. They think the fact that they’ve done great work will be enough.

Every employee needs goals to strive for. Not only do goals give employees direction and purpose, but they ensure that your employees are working towards the overall organizational goals. Set specific and measurable goals with your employees, then regularly monitor their progress toward achieving them.

First, let’s consider the difference between managing and leading. Managing involves overseeing daily, tactical office functions and activities, whereas leading involves building on the overall capabilities of your team. Management is about navigating or attempting to resolve everyday issues, while leadership is about changing the mindsets of your team and how they view those challenges.

3. Balance between personal life and professional life: With the fast paced times, professional and personal lives are quickly overlapping each other. Therefore, it is necessary for a leader to understand the difference between the two and pay respect to the team member’s personal life as well as professional growth.

Envisioning means creating, establishing and communicating a clear,  concise, and compelling vision of what value the organization provides  to its customers and to its other stakeholders, and delineates the  organization’s position, or intended position, in the market.

Great leaders have a remarkable impact on the people they encounter. They’re motivated to achieve big things and they do it by guiding, challenging and supporting others. The work is difficult and sometimes vexing, but it’s remarkably rewarding.  

Individuals with dominant personalities – they describe themselves as high in the desire to control their environment and influence other people, and are likely to express their opinions in a forceful way – are more likely to act as leaders in small-group situations.[76]

And as a coach, you have to inspire action that will help execute that goal. Reinforce an honest and candid environment without taking information personally. Equally treat everyone like you would want to be treated.

Tell them how long you’ve been teaching your course. If you’ve been teaching the same course twenty times, let them know, so they have a sense that you’ve created the best course possible. If you’re new to the classroom, however, don’t let your students know so they don’t see you as a pushover.

I have found the most effective managers to have varying amounts of the following three components, typically beginning with specific and deep domain expertise and morphing into motivation and organizational skills as they get more senior.

Some leaders may drive their teams to work hard, while others will constantly be at their sides, giving every task their one hundred percent. The latter is the type of leader that can expect to achieve more. Teams work better when they see that the one that they answer to is right by their side, sharing their struggles and triumphs.

Some great managers struggle with change and fail to be great leaders, while a great leader might fail to create a sense of stability in an organization and not measure up as a manager. HBS professor David Thomas points out that “increasingly, the people who are the most effective are those who essentially are both managers and leaders.”

Personal Story: There’s a local Mexican restaurant that I love, only because the food is awesome, but I love how it’s run. The owner brings food/drinks to customers, answers the phone and everything in between. He even makes sure to say hello to every person that comes into his door, even with over 100 packed tables. Now that’s an engaged leader!

Ultimately, everyone has it in them to be a great and effective leader. It takes knowledge and practice sure, but if you are flexible and consider the many different forms of leadership out there, then you may find your skills as a leader, and the ultimate effectiveness of your team, grows and expands to greatness.

Even in the worst situations such as experiencing low team morale or team members having made a big mistake at work, a great leader stays positive and figure out ways to keep the team motivated to solve the problems.

Great leaders take them in strides. They remain calm and logically think through the situation and utilize their resources. What they don’t do is fall apart and reveal to their team how worried they are, which leads to negative morale, fear and binge-drinking under desks.

No matter who you are, it’s always helpful when you have someone to look up to who is experienced with strong leadership capabilities. It makes it a lot easier to see someone perform in action than living by words on paper.

To succeed in business today, you need to be flexible and have good planning and organizational skills. Many people start a business thinking that they’ll turn on their computers or open their doors and start making money, only to find that making money in a business is much more difficult than they thought. You can avoid this in your business ventures by taking your time and planning out all the necessary steps you need to achieve success. 

Confidence is important because people will be looking to you on how to behave, particularly if things aren’t going 100% right. If you remain calm and poised, team members are far more likely to as well. As a result, morale and productivity will remain high and the problem will be solved more quickly.

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