“great leaders how to be good at everything you do”

The old adage, “Do as I say, not as I do” is crap. It might have worked on you when you were 6 years old, but it will not work on a team of adults. They might not let you know explicitly, but they will be unhappy, eventually leave, and this will cut into your product. It may not have immediate repercussions, but eventually, any hypocrisy on your part will catch up with you.
In contrast to individual leadership, some organizations have adopted group leadership. In this so-called shared leadership, more than one person provides direction to the group as a whole. It is furthermore characterized by shared responsibility, cooperation and mutual influence among the team members.[98] Some organizations have taken this approach in hopes of increasing creativity, reducing costs, or downsizing. Others may see the traditional leadership of a boss as costing too much in team performance. In some situations, the team members best able to handle any given phase of the project become the temporary leaders. Additionally, as each team member has the opportunity to experience the elevated level of empowerment, it energizes staff and feeds the cycle of success.[99]
Take everything from steps 1 and 2 and write it all down — your guilt, each of the whys you asked, and how you can solve everything. This will you get a clear understanding of how your mind works when it comes to guilt and problem solving.
Good leaders listen, motivate, delegate and provide vision. Leaders can improve listening skills through practice and education. A leader motivates those under her to work hard, and she inspires productivity. Knowing when and to whom to delicate tasks is an important leadership skill, along with providing a vision that is clear and comprehensive.
HBS professor Joe Badaracco agrees that the traditional manager versus leader argument (“Clark Kent versus Superman,” he jokes) tends to undermine the value of management. “There are lots of people who look and act like managers, who have excellent managerial skills, and who don’t make a lot of noise. Nobody is writing cover stories about them. But after they have been in an organization for a period of time, things are significantly better,” observes Badaracco. “Now, are these mere managers because we can’t compare them with Martin Luther King? Or are they leaders because they accomplished something that needed to be done?”
Leadership is found in those who think outside the box and demonstrate creative new ways of thinking. Creativity may mean empowering employees to take risks and expand their professional scope past what they dreamed possible. According to Patty Vogan, executive leadership coach and chair of TEC International, great leaders have the vision and character to inspire employees to be creative. Leaders who share their own vision for success with their employees, and inspire them through strength of character and good decision making, lead to a creative workplace. In the small business world, this type of creative leadership will keep employees fired up with new ideas.
Let the members of your team know that you welcome their ideas. Leaders who encourage involvement from group members are often referred to as democratic or participative leaders. While they retain the final say over all decisions, they encourage team members to take an active role in coming up with ideas and plans.
5. Celebration. In today’s work environment, people are working very long hours and they need to take some time to celebrate their successes in order to recharge their batteries. Those leaders who fail to do this create burnout environment overtime.
In the words of author Hans Finzel, “Leaders are paid to be dreamers.” Whether you’re leading a small community group or a large corporation, you have to know your team/organization’s goals better than anyone else.
This is far more complex than it actually sounds. Good communication skills are essential for a great leader. You may very well understand the cave of crazy that is your brain, but that doesn’t mean that you can adequately take the ideas out of it and explain them to someone else.
His radical management innovations have transformed Haier from a small, failing, state-owned refrigerator maker into the world’s largest appliance brand. He groups employees into small, self-managing teams that choose their own managers, compete for internal talent, and can earn big bonuses — unusual in the West and unheard-of in China.
In recent years, considerable evidence has emerged that the strongest organisations and groups tend to permit and actively encourage each member of the group or organisation to take the lead at the appropriate point. Organisations and families with particularly controlling leaders, by contrast, tend to be fairly dysfunctional.
Warren Buffett, chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., left, speaks to David Rubenstein, co-founder and managing director of the Carlyle Group, during the Economic Club of Washington dinner event in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, June 5, 2012. Buffett said he doesn’t expect another U.S. recession unless Europe’s crisis spreads. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
“Research clearly shows that transformational leaders—leaders who are positive, inspiring, and who empower and develop followers—are better leaders,” explains psychologist and leadership expert Ronald E. Riggio. “They are more valued by followers and have higher performing teams.”

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