“great leadership like a leader”

1. Confidence. If you don’t believe in yourself, no one will. I hear leaders worrying that if they show too much confidence, others will think them arrogant. The reality is people want to know what you know for sure — and what you don’t. Having the confidence to say “I don’t know” is a powerful skill.
SMART stands for specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-oriented. And with each element in SMART objectives, you’re going to want to ask yourself a set of questions that’ll help you develop a winning goal.
Following Steve Jobs has arguably been the toughest corporate leadership assignment in decades, yet Cook has carried it off with mostly quiet aplomb. In 2½ years he has kept the parade of winning new products marching (the Retina display, new operating systems, the iPhone 5), and he is bringing in Burberry’s savior, Angela Ahrendts, to run Apple’ (AAPL)s retail stores. That’s thinking different.
One has to try to think out of the box to have good visions and to come up with effective strategies that will help advance the vision. I’d also add here the need for a sense of humor. It’s a creative skill that is in great need by leaders. We should read the funnies more!
^ Jump up to: a b Judge, Timothy A.; Bono, Joyce E.; Ilies, Remus; Gerhardt, Megan W. “Personality and leadership: A qualitative and quantitative review”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 87 (4): 765–780. doi:10.1037//0021-9010.87.4.765.
Your team members aren’t the only ones who can benefit from honest feedback. A true self-assessment of your own leadership can be difficult, so mentors, fellow professionals and even your own staff are invaluable in evaluating your effectiveness. According to St. Marie, talking to friends and peers often brings needed perspective on your leadership approach and style. Leadership coaching can also help you discover areas that need improvement. A professional who helps you develop a plan to achieve your leadership goals can be more motivational than books and seminars alone. 
A leader is “a person who influences a group of people towards the achievement of a goal”. A mnemonic for this definition would be 3P’s – Person, People and Purpose as illustrated by the following diagram.
The first two – public and private leadership – are “outer” or behavioral levels. These are the behaviors that address what Scouller called “the four dimensions of leadership”. These dimensions are: (1) a shared, motivating group purpose; (2) action, progress and results; (3) collective unity or team spirit; (4) individual selection and motivation. Public leadership focuses on the 34 behaviors involved in influencing two or more people simultaneously. Private leadership covers the 14 behaviors needed to influence individuals one to one.
To improve his leadership skills, a leader can benefit from assessment performed by a professional leadership consultant. Through this type of consultation, a leader’s strengths and weaknesses are identified and an action plan is developed to address needs in both personal and professional concerns.
To be a leader, you don’t have to be an elected official or a CEO. A leader is someone whom others consistently want to follow for new trends and ideas. A fancy title can make that happen temporarily, but a true leader inspires steadfast loyalty through the steps below!
22% of employees say unrealistic expectations from managers are their top workplace stressor. Strong leaders make their employees’ jobs easier, not more difficult and stressful! They understand the importance of banishing ambiguity and unrealistic expectations by setting clear objectives for their team members. So give your managers the right training and tools to ensure they set clear SMART goals for their team. At Growth Engineering we use a bottom-up productivity tool called 5x5s. Give it a try!
The transactional leader (Burns, 1978)[58] is given power to perform certain tasks and reward or punish for the team’s performance. It gives the opportunity to the manager to lead the group and the group agrees to follow his lead to accomplish a predetermined goal in exchange for something else. Power is given to the leader to evaluate, correct, and train subordinates when productivity is not up to the desired level, and reward effectiveness when expected outcome is reached.
Can you remember when you last listened to someone without interruptions or distractions from either telephone calls or drop-in visitors, when you just focused intently on the person speaking with you, ignoring all else? When CEO Alan Mulally arrived at Ford, he used a technique he had refined at Boeing. He found a way to instantly shift the senior executives on his team from talkers to listeners by changing the way he evaluated his team’s performance.
5. Learn how to spot talent. A huge element of great leadership is knowing how to connect with the right kind of people–those who can move your vision forward and develop successful strategies. But hiring great individuals is only half the game; it’s just as important to understand how people of diverse backgrounds and abilities can best work together.
Keep in mind that it is perfectly fine to spend some time doing nothing and just being lazy each day. This can actually help with your imagination and self-awareness. Strive for a balance between doing things you want to do and allowing yourself to just “be.”
A leader cannot be successful if they do not know how to communicate effectively – but there are also many other qualities which they need. Leaders need to show, not just tell. Even Richard Branson said,” Communication is the most important skill any leader can possess”. Most problems can be solved with some good, honest and open conversations. But if you are a leader your communication skills are absolutely vital to also inspire your employees, keep them happy and engaged and dazzle your customers and investors.
Outstanding management skills are important to any manager’s career. If you’re aiming for a higher target, such as a director-level or senior executive role, you may benefit from developing outstanding leadership skills, as well.
Merkel was a bad leader when it came to migrants. She gave the wrong signal- viz. if you manage to reach Germany you will be looked after. This led thousands of desperate people to risk their lives to get to Germany before the borders closed. Merkel did a U turn. As a result hundreds of thousands are trapped in terrible circumstances. One result of Merkel’s grandstanding is that some British voters backed ‘Brexit’ because they were afraid that millions of refugees would be let into the EU and that Britain would have to take a large number of them. Another result is that the standing of the Hungarian and Polish leaders went up and they were emboldened to undermine the rule of Law in their own countries.
To all my fellow learning leaders, I leave you with my final thoughts for strong leadership. Listen to your team, learn together and remember to have fun along the way! As Churchill wisely said: “You cannot deal with the most serious things in the world unless you understand the most amusing.”
Situational theory also appeared as a reaction to the trait theory of leadership. Social scientists argued history was more than the result of intervention of great men as Carlyle suggested. Herbert Spencer (1884) (and Karl Marx) said that the times produce the person and not the other way around.[40] This theory assumes that different situations call for different characteristics; according to this group of theories, no single optimal psychographic profile of a leader exists. According to the theory, “what an individual actually does when acting as a leader is in large part dependent upon characteristics of the situation in which he functions.”[41]
Believe that anyone can be a leader. Truth be told, everyone is looking to be led. Think of life as a dark path — the more leaders you have, the more people are in front of you holding industrial strength flashlights. Which would you rather have? Not only do people want leaders, but also they are looking for them. For that reason, anyone can do it. You just got to fill the void.
Gain pleasure. Avoid pain. That’s pretty much what we’re wired for. But is there more to life? Will Edwards considered the question and realized that there is. He realized that we need to wake up to our life purpose and dedicate ourselves to fulfilling it. That’s the only way we’ll live to the full. In 7 Keys to Success, he discusses what it takes to do just that:
There’s no playbook for how to become an elite leader in basketball. Whether it’s John Wooden teaching his UCLA players the proper way to tie their shoes or Zen master (and new Knicks president) Phil Jackson referencing Buddha, the point is to get five players working in harmony — however you do it. Three active coaches with very different styles stand out. We’re hard-pressed to say which is best: Duke’s Coach K (above, right), who has developed players for decades with a mixture of toughness and love — in the process becoming the winningest Division I men’s college basketball coach in history and leading the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team to a pair of gold medals? Or the famously terse Coach Pop, who empowers his players by sometimes stepping back? “What do you want me to do?” he has challenged his stars in a time-out. “Figure it out.” And they do: Coach Pop has had more consecutive winning seasons (16) than any active NBA coach. Or Dawn Staley, who has led women’s teams at Temple and South Carolina to storied records? The former WNBA star initially didn’t want to coach. But as Staley noted at her induction into the National Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013, she knew she made the right decision when “I started to care more about my players than to win.” That might be the common trait of the great ones.
Another crucial element of great leadership is “brain” that is synonymous with intellect or “canniness.” It is the ability to separate the wheat from the chaff, and “make smart decisions in a complex and rapidly changing world.”

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