“leadership skills examples leader of a team”

The transactional leader (Burns, 1978)[58] is given power to perform certain tasks and reward or punish for the team’s performance. It gives the opportunity to the manager to lead the group and the group agrees to follow his lead to accomplish a predetermined goal in exchange for something else. Power is given to the leader to evaluate, correct, and train subordinates when productivity is not up to the desired level, and reward effectiveness when expected outcome is reached.
What makes a good leader? Just like what is the best leadership style? There is no magic formula nor is there a one-size-fits-all answer. Perhaps we should agree on what has been proven to result in a good leader? Some might believe that a good leader can be measured from a qualitative perspective, meaning that he or she has built a reputation of being a good boss! Personally I prefer — and for the purpose of this article — we should use a more measurable approach to define just what makes a good leader.
Noam Chomsky[123] and others[124] have subjected the concept of leadership to critical thinking and have provided an analysis that asserts that people abrogate their responsibility to think and will actions for themselves. While the conventional view of leadership may satisfy people who “want to be told what to do”, these critics say that one should question why they are being subjected to a will or intellect other than their own if the leader is not a subject-matter expert (SME).
Creativity is the ability to think differently, to get outside of the box that constrains solutions. Creativity gives leaders the ability to see things that others have not seen and thus lead followers in new directions. The most important question that a leader can ask is, “What if … ?” Possibly the worst thing a leader can say is, “I know this is a dumb question … ”
It is necessary that you have some understanding of human behavior and why people will act in a certain manner as opposed to responding in another way. In a context that fosters ethics and honesty, observation and active listening will provide you with all of the answers. Of course, some advance knowledge of human behaviour is essential for you to interpret the situation more accurately thus minimizing misunderstandings and consequently increasing your ability to make the appropriate decisions.
“It’s fascinating how differently the same business can perform with two different leaders. We look first for intellectual honesty. It drives me crazy when you meet with management and there are real issues and they act like they aren’t there. Also important is a contrarian bent, a confidence to go against the prevailing trend. You generally don’t want people who are saying this is what we should do because this is what others are doing. You want people who are spending when others are not, and taking chips off the table when everybody else is putting them on.”
Mastering success means learning to love being a small fish in a big pond. Most people don’t want to admit those three little words…“I don’t know.” Instead of choosing to learn, they reject the opportunity and instead go back to entertaining themselves.
Yet for so many organizations, this is the prevailing leadership style, stifling the work atmosphere and causing unnecessary fear and stress among people. But the reality is, a “driven” leader the complete opposite of what a true leader is or does.
Jump up ^ Hoyt, C. L.; Blascovich, J. (2016-07-26). “Leadership Efficacy and Women Leaders’ Responses to Stereotype Activation”. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations. 10 (4): 595–616. doi:10.1177/1368430207084718.
Passion for your organisation includes how your organisation ontributes to society, the value it adds to customers. Look beyond your mission and vision to find a higher purpose that will motivate and inspire your people.
He apparently believed in being brutally honest with others and that their feelings were irrelevant. He did not conduct formal reviews with employees and was very sparing with praise for a job well done.
Be liked. Though it’s important for your workers to respect you most of all, it couldn’t hurt for them to think you’re a person who is worth spending time with. This will make them more excited to work for you and to have you as their leader! Here are some ways to make sure you are liked:
PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY. Don’t expect other people to believe in you, don’t expect your friends to get behind you or your family to support you. If they do, great! But if they don’t, you can’t go around blaming them for your failures.
4. Engagement. Great business leaders are able to get all members of their teams engaged. They do this by offering them challenge, seeking their ideas and contributions and providing them with recognition for their contributions.
[Focus on the objective (the Vision), not on leading.  The means can and should be developed collaboratively, though the team leader is the final arbiter.  You inspire others by engaging people justly, managing yourself, acting with integrity and passion]
Accept that life is unfair. It’s a fact. You can moan about it and wish that it were different, or you can go out there and do something about it. So stop wasting time about the unfairness of it all and think how to use the situation for your benefit. Newton could have complained about the apple falling from the tree and hitting his head. Instead, he identified the law of gravity and is now known as the father of physics.
According to Maxwell’s Law of Magnetism, we attract people who are similar to us. So, if you’re an insecure, lazy person (which I’m sure none of you are), you’re going to struggle to build a strong inner circle because you attract people with the same bad habits that you have.
Rescuing a giant, old industrial corporation in decline is almost impossible; few leaders have ever done it. Fewer still — maybe none except Ghosn — have done it while also a top executive at a separate industrial giant on the other side of the world. His salvation of Nissan from 1999 to 2005 remains “one of the most dramatic turnarounds in the history of the modern corporation,” says McKinsey. He did it by smashing Japanese cultural norms — laying off thousands of workers and cutting ties with members of the Nissan keiretsu. Japanese citizens and media were enraged, but the shock treatment worked, and Ghosn soon became a Japanese hero, his exploits even celebrated in a manga comic book. No wonder the Insead business school calls Ghosn a “transcultural leader.”
Try new things. Take some risk. Make yourself uncomfortable. Do the things that may risk making you look foolish – what do you have to lose? Leaders take risks. They are not afraid of doing what they believe.
Partner with a competitor. Whether you’re a long distance runner or rolling out back-end solutions to technology giants, partnering with the competition may help you pool your resources, motivate you to work harder, and build new relationships.
Extraordinary means investing your money in assets, not liabilities. The wealthy don’t become wealthy by sitting on their hands — they spend enormous amounts of time becoming extremely financially literate and make their money work for them.
For Rosabeth Moss Kanter, a key question is whether a leader’s personal passion matches his or her aspirations. “There are so many false starts, unexpected obstacles, and surprising turns along the path to change. Daily work often drains energy needed for change,” she says. “Leaders must pick causes they won’t abandon easily, remain committed despite setbacks, and communicate their big ideas over and over again in every encounter.”
No matter where you are on the chain, you can work on this. Do you excel at written reports, but clam up when it’s time to speak during a meeting? Alternatively, are you a natural when it comes to conversation—but secretly worried that your lack of grammar know-how will hold you back?
Leave room for input. Though it’s important to be firm, you should still leave some room for the considerations of others. This way you won’t look like a dictator. Also, there’s a lot you can learn from your employees, which might help your business thrive.
“You can know your mission and vision, but it is equally, if not more, important to know your people,” said Joe Nolan, CEO of Motus Global, a company that provides biomechanical analysis for athletes. “If you care about and take care of your people, they will take care of your customers, and ultimately, you will accomplish your mission.”

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