“making the team a guide for managers great examples of leadership”

Even more interesting, was that more than half of the people surveyed who agreed with the statement “I feel I can approach my manager with any type of question” were considered actively engaged in their work, showing that there might be a link between a manager being open and employee engagement.
2. Self-awareness. You need to be clear on what your strengths are and what complementary strengths you need from others. This includes understanding others and learning how best to utilize their strengths. Many unsophisticated leaders think everyone should be like them; that too can cause their downfall. They surround themselves with people like them. “Group think” can blindside them and cause failure.
Caring for them is not the same as acquiescing to their desires. You’re leading (hopefully) because you know what’s best for the team; they may not. Just because someone disagrees with you doesn’t mean you have to give them what they want. Allow them to disagree with you, listen to their argument, and let them know why you think the way you do. Let them know you care, but are acting in the best way you see fit.
Magnanimity means giving credit where it is due. A magnanimous leader ensures that credit for successes is spread as widely as possible throughout the company. Conversely, a good leader takes personal responsibility for failures. This sort of reverse magnanimity helps other people feel good about themselves and draws the team closer together. To spread the fame and take the blame is a hallmark of effective leadership.
The bureaucratic leadership style i.e. “The Commanding Leader” is increasingly less effective in the ever evolving digital age where people are more connected than ever. Employees want a more collaborative approach to leadership. 41% of employees say they want their leadership to come from the company that they work for as a whole and from all employees. They want a ‘leadership-by-all’ model. This is much more than the 25% who say that leadership should only come from the company CEO, according to the KLCM report. Interestingly, Millennial employees have higher expectations of leadership from CEOs and those in Senior Management. Only 35% of Millennials prefer the ‘leadership-by-all’ model, which is 6% less than the general consensus.
I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. – Michael Jordan
In 2005 the self-made furniture exporter was elected mayor of Solo, a 500,000-person city in Indonesia. “Jokowi,” as he’s known, cleaned up the city and rooted out corruption, thrilling an Indonesian public weary of the status quo. His ascent since then has been swift: In 2012 he became governor of Jakarta. Now he’s the favorite for Indonesia’s July 2014 presidential election.
A leader by its meaning is one who goes first and leads by example, so that others are motivated to follow him. This is a basic requirement. To be a leader, a person must have a deep-rooted commitment to the goal that he will strive to achieve it even if nobody follows him!
3. Become a great communicator. Discipline yourself to understand what’s happening around you by observing and listening. A great leader is always a skilled communicator–not only as speaker but as a listener, someone who stays focused and tuned in to the nuance of a conversation.
Rather than comparing yourself with people who are “better off” than you, think about all of the people who are homeless, chronically ill, or living in poverty. This will help you appreciate what you have rather than feeling sorry for yourself. Try engaging in volunteer work to help make this more apparent. This can help to boost your happiness and confidence as well.
Victor Vroom, in collaboration with Phillip Yetton (1973)[44] and later with Arthur Jago (1988),[45] developed a taxonomy for describing leadership situations, which was used in a normative decision model where leadership styles were connected to situational variables, defining which approach was more suitable to which situation.[46] This approach was novel because it supported the idea that the same manager could rely on different group decision making approaches depending on the attributes of each situation. This model was later referred to as situational contingency theory.[47]
The leader knows how to motivate better than anyone else; it is one of their main functions as people managers. Through motivation, the leader channels the energy and professional potential of their coworkers, in order to achieve the objectives.

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