“people follow you percent of the typical manager’s day is spent engaged in communications”

Have fun with your family! Don’t get so caught up in making rules that you forget to enjoy your precious time with your loved ones. Here are some tips for making sure there is more fun than rules in your household:
A good leader sets the bar high for their people, because they want to reach the goals and make the best of their teams. Only a demanding leader will achieve great results. In addition to this thoroughness, the leader must know how to listen, in order to know the needs of the people, and then provide the necessary time and resources for them to do their job properly, and therefore meet what is demanded of them.
For example, Nalini Ambady, a researcher at Tufts University, shows that when people watch 30-second soundless clips of real physician-patient interactions, their judgments of the physician’s niceness predict whether or not that physician will be sued. So it doesn’t have to do so much with whether or not that physician was incompetent, but do we like that person and how they interacted?
41. Leadership is the collective action of everyone you influence. Your behavior–your actions and your words–determines how you influence. Our job as leaders is to energize whatever marshals action within others. –David Caullo
You should give them further vision, a goal, which is consist of not only numbers, but values. Vision, mission, value creating meetings could help to develop these goals. You should be at honest on these meetings as you can, sharing your hopes and what you want to be reality
Luckily for us, leadership isn’t a magical gift but a set of skills that you can acquire and practice. It may come more easily to some than to others, but it’s within reach of all of us. You just have to want it, be willing to work and dare to take a risk.
“Great leaders also hire and inspire other great leaders, whom they trust to carry out the company mission and instill a sense of purpose that touches each and every staff member,” added Tom Villante, co-founder, chairman and CEO of payment processing company YapStone.
Show your commitment to your team’s betterment. For your organization to grow, everyone has to get better. This has nothing to do with just you being great — you have to make your team great. Ideally, when the task is done the team will say, “We did it!”, not you exclaiming, “I did it!” It’s about the whole of the group, not the one.
Before you appoint a leader, or go out looking for one, make sure you have a clear understanding of what it is you want them to achieve. Make sure they have the qualities and characteristics of a good leader, and whether or not they are a good fit with the team they will be leading.
Don’t burn bridges along the way. A lot of life is about personal relationships, so don’t forsake them. If you’ve invented a cheap, efficient way to make nuclear fission, but everyone dislikes you, you have no spouse, and no friends, will it be worth it?
Writing in Forbes magazine, Erika Andersen, author of Leading So People Will Follow, says, like most things – leadership capability falls along a bell curve. So the fact is that most folks who start out with a modicum of innate leadership capability can actually become very good, even great leaders (Are Leaders Born or Made?)
It doesn’t matter if you are running a business, managing a team, or teaching a class–leadership skills are important. Some people seem to be born knowing what to do to inspire and lead people, but for most of us it doesn’t come that naturally.
Avoid making important decisions, such as letting your daughter go to a slumber party at a new friend’s house, without your significant other. If he or she doesn’t agree with your choice, then he or she will look like the bad guy.
3. Become a great communicator. Discipline yourself to understand what’s happening around you by observing and listening. A great leader is always a skilled communicator–not only as speaker but as a listener, someone who stays focused and tuned in to the nuance of a conversation.
“Great leaders are aware of their own style and make the effort to learn how their style actually comes across to their team. They learn to flex their leadership style to individual team members so that they communicate and behave in ways that motivate and inspire.”
Brad Robinson, founder and CEO of Ritual Gym, says, “I believe that taking care of yourself shows that a certain level of commitment and discipline is part of character. In a world where we interact with more people on a daily basis than at any time in history, you don’t have very much time to make an impression — seconds matter.”
We live in an age of ‘Big Data’ & burgeoning Artificial Intelligence. It may well be that ‘Expert Systems’ will increasingly take leadership roles- i.e. their actions will solve coordination and concurrency problems. Our hearts may misgive us, but our brains may see this is as a good thing. Compassion- as Ethical theorists and Behavioral Psychologists are increasingly finding- may be counterproductive. It may paralyse rather than catalyse needful policy decisions.
In most situations, no leader will be titled as such. It’s just a position that someone naturally gravitates to. People will not grant you the outright privilege, but they can keep you from having it. Avoid coming off as a dominant, who-does-he-think-he-is go-getter and wait for the right moment. You’ll feel it.
Reward employees for good behavior. To be a good leader, you need to maintain high team morale, and to motivate employees to achieve their goals in a timely manner. Also, make your rewards desirable and fun!
Who says leadership is a one-way relationship? As you work toward developing some of these leadership qualities, don’t forget to look to your followers for feedback and inspiration. Pay attention to the things that have been effective in the past and always be on the lookout for new ways to inspire, motivate and reward group members.
Indonesia’s Joko Widodo won a closely fought presidential election on promises to break with the authoritarian past, improve welfare for the poor and take on corruption, end nepotism and intolerance, which had flourished during the 31-year-long dictatorship of former President Suharto. He seeks to focus on education and modern technology and enjoyed a good relationship with Obama. He now hopes to continue to work together with Trump “to build peace and create prosperity for the world.”
Leaders must have the ability to act in an interpersonally competent manner, yet they also need to learn the techniques of good listening, honest and open communication, delegating, conflict resolution skills, etc., to actually get work done and keep the whole movement/organization/project together.
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Don’t make excuses. Don’t rationalize your failure by placing the blame on someone or something else. Accept when something is your fault. This will help you identify what you need to change to get better. An excuse after failure is a refusal to make the situation better.
“A leader needs to communicate in a way that makes people feel what they need to do. As a leader of a large group you have to keep in mind that people need to believe in you and know that you’re behind any given message. It’s not only what you say but truly what you feel and believe. This rule reminds all of us, and leaders in particular, that emotions are a powerful motivator — or, in some cases, a de-motivator. We’re social creatures who need interaction, and you use that to make points when they’re important enough. When you deliver a message face-to-face, it’s strikingly different than when you do some kind of mass communication. If we’re going to have impact as leaders, we have a responsibility to communicate directly, eyeball-to-eyeball, and with authenticity.”
Until you clearly communicate your vision to your team and tell them the strategy to achieve the goal, it will be very difficult for you to get the results you want. Simply put, if you are unable to communicate your message effectively to your team, you can never be a good leader. A good communicator can be a good leader. Words have the power to motivate people and make them do the unthinkable. If you use them effectively, you can also achieve better results.
Put even more simply, the leader is the inspiration and director of the action. He or she is the person in the group that possesses the combination of personality and leadership skills that makes others want to follow his or her direction.
7. Develop your leadership chops. Some people are born leaders, but most of us have to learn it the hard way. The best way to hone your managerial skills is to be a manager via on-the-job training. Other approaches are to emulate the qualities of authority figures you admire and read books and articles on the subject. You can find information on proper ways to delegate, how to manage creative people and much more on the TCG Blog.
To make his case, Brown sorts successful leaders into two categories. “Redefining” leaders radically change the political landscape, not by “[seeking] centre ground” but by “[moving] the centre in their direction.” Brown puts Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson in this category, because several of their signature achievements—FDR’s New Deal, and LBJ’s War on Poverty and dedication to civil rights—have had a major and lasting impact on American society. We tend to think of these men as strong leaders, and in many ways we’re right. But Brown shows a different side of the story: because of the checks and balances of the American political system, neither FDR nor LBJ had the ability to govern by fiat. Their strength lay in their power to persuade—to convince their colleagues in government, and the American people, to understand and support their point of view.
This is not necessarily a bad thing but leadership involves more. To be effective, a leader certainly has to manage the resources at her disposal. But leadership also involves communicating, inspiring and supervising – just to name three more of the primary skills a leader has to have to be successful.
HBS professor Joe Badaracco agrees that the traditional manager versus leader argument (“Clark Kent versus Superman,” he jokes) tends to undermine the value of management. “There are lots of people who look and act like managers, who have excellent managerial skills, and who don’t make a lot of noise. Nobody is writing cover stories about them. But after they have been in an organization for a period of time, things are significantly better,” observes Badaracco. “Now, are these mere managers because we can’t compare them with Martin Luther King? Or are they leaders because they accomplished something that needed to be done?”
In contrast to the appointed head or chief of an administrative unit, a leader emerges within the context of the informal organization that underlies the formal structure. The informal organization expresses the personal objectives and goals of the individual membership. Their objectives and goals may or may not coincide with those of the formal organization. The informal organization represents an extension of the social structures that generally characterize human life — the spontaneous emergence of groups and organizations as ends in themselves.
The good leader has great investigating skills, and the natural instinct to do so. Being more on the skeptical side motivates the good leader to question everything; the Who, What, Where, How and Why of any situation. This line of questioning allows them to not only identify potential strengths and weaknesses, but also why they are present and how they can be resolved.
No matter the situation, showing the person you are working with that you are on the same team can go a long way. If they come to you with an issue, take a moment to see things from their point of view. Maybe they have someone above them breathing down their neck. Maybe they have a lot on their plate. There is a reason why they are coming to you with a certain energy. The key is to meet them where they are, and then position yourself as a resource–not an enemy. If someone is in a stressful situation, or carrying a lot of anxiety, trying to strong-arm them will do nothing but make things worse.
^ Jump up to: a b c Lord, R. G.; De Vader, C. L.; Alliger, G. M. (1986). “A meta-analysis of the relation between personality traits and leader perceptions: An application of validity generalization procedures”. Journal of Applied Psychology. 71 (3): 402–410. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.71.3.402.

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