“share skills leader of a team”

Leadership is found in those who think outside the box and demonstrate creative new ways of thinking. Creativity may mean empowering employees to take risks and expand their professional scope past what they dreamed possible. According to Patty Vogan, executive leadership coach and chair of TEC International, great leaders have the vision and character to inspire employees to be creative. Leaders who share their own vision for success with their employees, and inspire them through strength of character and good decision making, lead to a creative workplace. In the small business world, this type of creative leadership will keep employees fired up with new ideas.
Henry Ford experienced a major setback after designing and improving the Ford Quadricycle. He founded the Detroit Automobile Company in 1899, but the resulting cars they produced did not live up to his standards and were too expensive. The company dissolved in 1901. Ford took this in stride and formed the Henry Ford Company. The sales were slow and the company had financial problems; it wasn’t until 1903 that the Ford Motor Company was successful and put the Ford on the map.
Task-oriented leadership is a style in which the leader is focused on the tasks that need to be performed in order to meet a certain production goal. Task-oriented leaders are generally more concerned with producing a step-by-step solution for given problem or goal, strictly making sure these deadlines are met, results and reaching target outcomes.
Over the years the philosophical terminology of “management” and “leadership” have, in the organizational context, been used both as synonyms and with clearly differentiated meanings. Debate is fairly common about whether the use of these terms should be restricted, and generally reflects an awareness of the distinction made by Burns (1978) between “transactional” leadership (characterized by e.g. emphasis on procedures, contingent reward, management by exception) and “transformational” leadership (characterized by e.g. charisma, personal relationships, creativity).[58]
Scouller proposed the Three Levels of Leadership model, which was later categorized as an “Integrated Psychological” theory on the Businessballs education website.[54] In essence, his model aims to summarize what leaders have to do, not only to bring leadership to their group or organization, but also to develop themselves technically and psychologically as leaders.
Last but not least, great leaders know their team inside out. They know where the strengths and skills gaps are and how to best structure their teams for success. What’s more, employees who believe their manager can name their strengths are 71% more likely to be engaged at work. Everyone in your team can get to know each other better, by sharing their skills and strengths on the LMS message boards. So what are you waiting for? Go and get to know your team!
Can you remember when you last listened to someone without interruptions or distractions from either telephone calls or drop-in visitors, when you just focused intently on the person speaking with you, ignoring all else? When CEO Alan Mulally arrived at Ford, he used a technique he had refined at Boeing. He found a way to instantly shift the senior executives on his team from talkers to listeners by changing the way he evaluated his team’s performance.
“I think a great leader is one who makes those around him/her better. There are many litmus tests for a great leader, but I really look to those around them,” said Dana Brownlee, founder of Professionalism Matters. “Are they growing, becoming better leaders themselves, motivated, etc.?”
Social Awareness. Understanding social networks and key influencers in that social network is another key part of leadership. Who in the organization has the most clout, both officially and unofficially? Who moves the hearts of the group?
There is no question that some people are intrinsically more drawn towards leadership roles than others. However, it would be nonsense to suggest—although this has been mooted in the past—that only people with certain physical or personal traits could lead. For example, it has clearly been proven that being male, or being tall, does not of itself make someone a better leader, although many leaders are both male and tall.
Finally, accept that we all make mistakes. Nobody is perfect. When you do, try to learn the lessons, but don’t be destabilised. Someone told me once: “don’t chew the cud”. Keep moving forward, be resilient, remember that things will get better. And smile.
Responsive to the group’s needs: Being perceptive can also help a leader be more effective in knowing the needs of the team. Some teams value trust over creativity; others prefer a clear communicator to a great organizer. Building a strong team is easier when you know the values and goals of each individual, as well as what they need from you as their leader.
Don’t burn bridges along the way. A lot of life is about personal relationships, so don’t forsake them. If you’ve invented a cheap, efficient way to make nuclear fission, but everyone dislikes you, you have no spouse, and no friends, will it be worth it?
When you believe in what you are trying to succeed, you believe in yourself and what you can do. Therefore, you are very likely to become committed to proving to yourself that you can succeed. People who are not committed will find this very hard as they could lose focus on their goals and give up before they reach success.
Brad Robinson, founder and CEO of Ritual Gym, says, “I believe that taking care of yourself shows that a certain level of commitment and discipline is part of your character. In a world where we interact with more people on a daily basis than at any time in history, you don’t have very much time to make an impression — seconds matter.”
1.3.1. We want immediate results when we start something new. But life isn’t like that. When we start something new, we experience the principle of lag. This means that there is a period of time before action shows results
Your team members aren’t the only ones who can benefit from honest feedback. A true self-assessment of your own leadership can be difficult, so mentors, fellow professionals and even your own staff are invaluable in evaluating your effectiveness. According to St. Marie, talking to friends and peers often brings needed perspective on your leadership approach and style. Leadership coaching can also help you discover areas that need improvement. A professional who helps you develop a plan to achieve your leadership goals can be more motivational than books and seminars alone. 
Although John F. Kennedy was president of the United States for only 1,036 days before being assassinated in 1963, his legacy continues to influence politics. President Kennedy was a gifted orator whose speeches, as The Atlantic described them, “were filled with phrases that seemed designed to be carved in stone.” Although his first year in the White House included several failed attempts to topple Cuba’s Communist regime, President Kennedy used his charismatic leadership style to prevent the U.S. from bombing Cuba and reach a peaceful end to the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. Many of JFK’s proposals to strengthen civil rights, voting rights, and aid poor and elderly citizens were passed into law after his death.

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