“so many leaders you ask for followers how to better”

You will change your life by achieving just one important goal, you create a pattern, a template for personal success in your subconscious mind. You will change your life and be automatically directed, and driven toward repeating that success in other things that you attempt.
David Jeffries of Allmusic noted the song as a standout track from Ready.[13] Andrew Rennie of Now Magazine called a “cautionary anthem” and the song the top track on the album.[14] Rennie also said that “Successful” and “Black Roses”, showcase Songz’s developed, more mature side.[14] Sean Fennessey of The Village Voice said, “The calm, yearning song is a bona fide hit, and also the best example of where r&b lives today.”[15] DJBooth said that there was “no reason to doubt that this track will become a mainstream smash.”[16] Shaheem Reid of MTV News said, “It’s not a record that will kill the clubs, but when you just want to listen to superb lyricism and enthralling harmony, it’s a must have.”[3] Rolling Stone ranked the song seventeen on their list of “Best 25 Songs of 2009” list, and Spin ranked it the tenth best song of 2009 on their “The 20 Best Songs of 2009” list.[17][18]
Jump up ^ Sorrentino, Richard M.; Field, Nigel. “Emergent leadership over time: The functional value of positive motivation”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 50 (6): 1091–1099. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.50.6.1091.
There’s no playbook for how to become an elite leader in basketball. Whether it’s John Wooden teaching his UCLA players the proper way to tie their shoes or Zen master (and new Knicks president) Phil Jackson referencing Buddha, the point is to get five players working in harmony — however you do it. Three active coaches with very different styles stand out. We’re hard-pressed to say which is best: Duke’s Coach K (above, right), who has developed players for decades with a mixture of toughness and love — in the process becoming the winningest Division I men’s college basketball coach in history and leading the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team to a pair of gold medals? Or the famously terse Coach Pop, who empowers his players by sometimes stepping back? “What do you want me to do?” he has challenged his stars in a time-out. “Figure it out.” And they do: Coach Pop has had more consecutive winning seasons (16) than any NBA coach. Or Dawn Staley, who has led women’s teams at Temple and South Carolina to storied records? The former WNBA star initially didn’t want to coach. But as Staley noted at her induction into the National Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013, she knew she made the right decision when “I started to care more about my players than to win.” That might be the common trait of the great ones.
Schultz, Duane P. Schultz, Sydney Ellen (2010). Psychology and work today : an introduction to industrial and organizational psychology (10th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall. p. 171. ISBN 978-0205683581.
By overcoming adversity and achieving one great goal in any area, you will program yourself for success in other areas as well. In other words, you learn to succeed by succeeding. The more you achieve, the more you can achieve. Each of the keys to success, especially the first one, builds your confidence and belief that you will be successful next time and achieve ultimate personal success.
Personal Story: I believe that creativity in business comes from outside inspiration. For example, I enjoy cooking/grilling, interior design and graphic design (it helps that I have interior design and BBQ retail clients). But I make a point to find time for these creative activities which are not only therapeutic but they can also ignite my professional creativity. What are your creative outlets?
Leaders also need tools to help them understand the way that others behave, and create positive interactions. As a first step, it may be helpful to understand more about emotional intelligence—another vital quality for leaders to possess—but there are a number of other tools that may also be useful, including Transactional Analysis, and Myers-Briggs Type Indicators.
Take everything from steps 1 and 2 and write it all down — your guilt, each of the whys you asked, and how you can solve everything. This will help you get a clear understanding of how your mind works when it comes to guilt and problem solving.
This is the essence of Angela Duckworth’s groundbreaking book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. In short, it is not the individual with the greatest starting position or motivation that usually wins — it’s the person who has the most “grit.” The person who can last the longest.
An important quality of a good leader is their authenticity; their ability to remain true to themselves, their beliefs, and their values. In fact, the good leader doesn’t have to simply remain true to themselves, but they must also be able to transfer their values and beliefs to his/her team.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Sy, T.; Cote, S.; Saavedra, R. (2005). “The contagious leader: Impact of the leader’s mood on the mood of group members, group affective tone, and group processes” (PDF). Journal of Applied Psychology. 90 (2): 295–305. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.90.2.295. PMID 15769239.
You need to understand just what the corporate objectives are. In other words, what is the organization producing and more importantly, what benefits will the product or services have for its customers. People prefer to have a global purpose; they would rather know that the actions they are performing each day will result in positive consequences.
Show your students you care. To be a good classroom leader, you have to prove that you care about your students’ success. Be kind and approachable in the classroom, so they respect you but aren’t afraid to ask questions.
Jokowi certainly appears to be growing in office. Trudeau and Macron, similarly, are attractive figures. However, they are yet to face their baptism of fire. It may be that popularity reinforces good leadership. However, history shows that the reverse is more likely. Popular leaders may become hostages to their own cultus and prefer cosmetic measures to surgical interventions.

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