“speech of great leaders manager as a leader”

^ Jump up to: a b c d Sy, T.; Cote, S.; Saavedra, R. (2005). “The contagious leader: Impact of the leader’s mood on the mood of group members, group affective tone, and group processes” (PDF). Journal of Applied Psychology. 90 (2): 295–305. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.90.2.295. PMID 15769239.
Steve Jobs is a classic example of someone who was probably not born to be a leader. After starting Apple Computer from his garage in 1976 he was fired by the board of directors in 1985 when the company was under intense competition and he disagreed with the CEO on of the future direction of the business. After founding Pixar Animation Studios and NeXT Computer he was eventually rehired by Apple in 1997 as CEO and went on to develop the revolutionary iPod, iPhone, and many other products.
Acting “as if” can be a playful game, where you toy with the balance of shedding off who you were or are, and instead don the costume of who you want to be. It may sound silly, but this is a powerful exercise for your mind.
That being said, you have to know your place. There will be times when you have to make the decision yourself and times when you have to give the team time to form a consensus. Respect your followers — what might happen if you veto their opinions? Which brings us to…
Make time for family every week. Whether it’s for cooking an Italian meal, watching a scary movie, or just having family board game night, it’s important to carve out quality time for all the members of your family.
If you feel like you’re not getting a valuable experience, don’t feel like you have to keep the relationship going. Don’t just disappear and not return their calls and emails. But certainly don’t waste either of your valuable time. Communicate your feelings and move on.
Remember that success does not guarantee happiness. Success is equated with achieving a goal, but don’t assume it will always bring happiness. Many people make the mistake that if they accomplish this or that, they’ll be happier. Fulfillment and satisfaction have a lot more to do with how you approach life than with what you do in life. Keep that in perspective.
Understand your income. When calculating your income, be sure to take into account the federal, state, and social security taxes that will be deducted from your gross pay. Don’t overlook miscellaneous deductions, such as health insurance premiums, savings bonds and loan payments. The resulting number is your net pay, which is what you end up taking home with you.
In contrast to individual leadership, some organizations have adopted group leadership. In this so-called shared leadership, more than one person provides direction to the group as a whole. It is furthermore characterized by shared responsibility, cooperation and mutual influence among the team members.[98] Some organizations have taken this approach in hopes of increasing creativity, reducing costs, or downsizing. Others may see the traditional leadership of a boss as costing too much in team performance. In some situations, the team members best able to handle any given phase of the project become the temporary leaders. Additionally, as each team member has the opportunity to experience the elevated level of empowerment, it energizes staff and feeds the cycle of success.[99]
Not everyone can be the “leader” as it’s most commonly defined in 21st-century popular culture. But everyone can develop their leadership qualities and use the influence they have in positive ways. These qualities and skills serve people well no matter what their position in life, and they ensure that when a situation arises that requires their particular skills, qualities, and knowledge, they’ll be ready to step in, lead, and make the path smoother and better for everyone.
Functional leadership theory (Hackman & Walton, 1986; McGrath, 1962; Adair, 1988; Kouzes & Posner, 1995) is a particularly useful theory for addressing specific leader behaviors expected to contribute to organizational or unit effectiveness. This theory argues that the leader’s main job is to see that whatever is necessary to group needs is taken care of; thus, a leader can be said to have done their job well when they have contributed to group effectiveness and cohesion (Fleishman et al., 1991; Hackman & Wageman, 2005; Hackman & Walton, 1986). While functional leadership theory has most often been applied to team leadership (Zaccaro, Rittman, & Marks, 2001), it has also been effectively applied to broader organizational leadership as well (Zaccaro, 2001). In summarizing literature on functional leadership (see Kozlowski et al. (1996), Zaccaro et al. (2001), Hackman and Walton (1986), Hackman & Wageman (2005), Morgeson (2005)), Klein, Zeigert, Knight, and Xiao (2006) observed five broad functions a leader performs when promoting organization’s effectiveness. These functions include environmental monitoring, organizing subordinate activities, teaching and coaching subordinates, motivating others, and intervening actively in the group’s work.
A toxic leader is someone who has responsibility over a group of people or an organization, and who abuses the leader–follower relationship by leaving the group or organization in a worse-off condition than when he/she joined it.
“A good leader can hold his or her emotions in check, especially in tough situations,” said David Moore, founding partner and regional vice president of Addison Group staffing firm. “For example, maybe you lost your best client, or a deal you’ve been working on falls through. Regardless, it’s important for leaders to guide a team through challenging times, encouraging them and remaining positive along the way. Team morale is heavily contingent upon a leader’s attitude.”
9. Invest in people. To be a great leader, you need to start at the heart of what matters in your organization–and what matters is your people. If you want to see them happy, engaged, loyal and dedicated, make the time to invest in them, nurture them and provide them with a clear vision of what needs to be done.
The first two – public and private leadership – are “outer” or behavioral levels. These are the behaviors that address what Scouller called “the four dimensions of leadership”. These dimensions are: (1) a shared, motivating group purpose; (2) action, progress and results; (3) collective unity or team spirit; (4) individual selection and motivation. Public leadership focuses on the 34 behaviors involved in influencing two or more people simultaneously. Private leadership covers the 14 behaviors needed to influence individuals one to one.
My mentors have helped me make (and save) millions of dollars over the years. But they’ve also taught me more about success — and what it looks like — than I could have ever figured out on my own. I can’t put a price on that.
Jump up ^ Graen, G. B.; Novak, M. A.; Sommerkamp, P. (1982). “The effects of leader-member exchange and job design on productivity and satisfaction: Testing a dual attachment model”. Organizational Behavior & Human Performance. 30 (1): 109–131. doi:10.1016/0030-5073(82)90236-7.
Don’t burn bridges along the way. A lot of life is about personal relationships, so don’t forsake them. If you’ve invented a cheap, efficient way to make nuclear fission, but everyone dislikes you, you have no spouse, and no friends, will it be worth it?
Adams, who sold Elite Daily to the Daily Mail in 2015 for 50 million dollars, knows a little about keeping an open mind. He says, “Learn from those who do things differently than you, not the ones around you doing the same things. And when you are on the journey, make sure you appreciate those who don’t give up on you.”
In the late 1940s and early 1950s, a series of qualitative reviews of these studies (e.g., Bird, 1940;[14] Stogdill, 1948;[15] Mann, 1959[16]) prompted researchers to take a drastically different view of the driving forces behind leadership. In reviewing the extant literature, Stogdill and Mann found that while some traits were common across a number of studies, the overall evidence suggested that persons who are leaders in one situation may not necessarily be leaders in other situations. Subsequently, leadership was no longer characterized as an enduring individual trait, as situational approaches (see alternative leadership theories below) posited that individuals can be effective in certain situations, but not others. The focus then shifted away from traits of leaders to an investigation of the leader behaviors that were effective. This approach dominated much of the leadership theory and research for the next few decades
Not everyone will be happy for you and your success. Some people are insecure and jealous. Be prepared for them, and look past them until you find the people who are happy for you and who support you in all that you do.
Dwight D. Eisenhower became the 34th president of the United States in 1953 after serving as commanding general of the Allied forces in World War II. His democratic/participative leadership style, skill in coalition-building, and ability to inspire confidence in others led him through two terms as an enormously popular president. He managed postwar military tension with Russia and China while overseeing the U.S. during its highest rate of economic prosperity. President Eisenhower was also an excellent negotiator who brokered the armistice that ended the Korean War in 1953.
The best strategic thinkers see the big picture, and are not distracted by side issues or minor details. All their decisions are likely to be broadly based on their answer to the question ‘does this take me closer to where I want to be?’
Embrace Self-Expression – Don’t be afraid to ask questions, speak openly and honestly, and give praise when it’s deserved (or simply needed). Giving up a little control over your words might cause people to open up and connect with you.
You must know your reasons for wanting to learn how to become successful and achieve your goals. This is the only way you can persevere when the going gets tough and achieve your goals. When things get challenging, reflect on what caused you to pursue this path in the first place. Were you conventionally successful but internally unhappy? Have you not utilized your skills as as you would like to? Are you trying to become a more well-rounded individual? Whatever your reason for wanting to succeed, use these motivations as the cornerstone of your desire to work hard and achieve more.
A leader is “a person who influences a group of people towards the achievement of a goal”. A mnemonic for this definition would be 3P’s – Person, People and Purpose as illustrated by the following diagram.
“Successful people maintain a positive focus in life no matter what is going on around them. They stay focused on their past successes rather than their past failures, and on the next action steps they need to take to get them closer to the fulfillment of their goals rather than all the other distractions that life presents to them. – Jack Canfield
Be proactive. If you have these ideas in your mind about what the deeper issues are, you can probably predict the problems that will crop up as a result. Instead of waiting for those problems to appear, take steps to prevent them. If you can’t prevent them, then you can at least prepare. That’s the core difference between a leader and a manager. A good manager responds well to various situations; a good leader takes effective action to prevent and create situations before they actually happen.
What SUCCESSFUL people do: They study salary negotiation, the mistakes most people make when trying to negotiate, and how to crack the negotiation code. They make a list of all the reasons they’ve EARNED a raise and they create a strategy for addressing the objections their boss might throw at them. Then they rehearse their pitch 100 times. They practice in front of a mirror, with their friends, and with strangers on the street. And they get results like Andrew who doubled his salary to nearly six figures.
To improve his leadership skills, a leader can benefit from assessment performed by a professional leadership consultant. Through this type of consultation, a leader’s strengths and weaknesses are identified and an action plan is developed to address needs in both personal and professional concerns.
4. Leadership transitions. Going from individual contributor to supervisor is only the first of many transitions along the leadership pipeline. You need to understand the business model, how it applies to your current position, what you need to do to provide the greatest value, and how to leverage your strengths at this level. This requires building competencies and focusing on the right things. No one ever tells you that there are many levels and many adjustments you need to make along the way.
In the 19th century the elaboration of anarchist thought called the whole concept of leadership into question. (Note that the Oxford English Dictionary traces the word “leadership” in English only as far back as the 19th century.) One response to this denial of élitism came with Leninism, which demanded an élite group of disciplined cadres to act as the vanguard of a socialist revolution, bringing into existence the dictatorship of the proletariat.
A leader has to have experience in the trenches,andnotonlythat, but to also· have the confidence in himself and his subordinates to accomplish the necessary goals for success. That comes by looking at those under him/her as equals.  Also , that person has to exude positive qualities and ambition to be the best one can be in whatever one hopes to accomplish.
Beyond these basic traits, leaders of today must also possess traits which will help them motivate others and lead them in new directions. Leaders of the future must be able to envision the future and convince others that their vision is worth following. To do this, they must have the following personality traits:
When it comes to accountability, you need to follow the approach highlighted by Arnold H Glasow when he said, “A good leader takes little more than his share of the blame and little less than his share of the credit.” Make sure that every one of your subordinates is accountable for what they are doing. If they do well, give them a pat on the back but if they struggle, make them realize their mistakes and work together to improve. Holding them accountable for their actions will create a sense of responsibility among your subordinates and they will go about the business more seriously.

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