“take leadership what are the follow-on tasks that leaders should accomplish”

Bruna Martinuzzi is the founder of Clarion Enterprises Ltd., and the author of two books: Presenting with Credibility: Practical Tools and Techniques for Effective Presentations and The Leader as a Mensch: Become the Kind of Person Others Want to Follow.

In Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders Captain David Marquet outlines how he implemented the leader-leader model while in charge of a nuclear submarine, the USS Santa Fe. Captain Marquet outlines four primary pillars of the leader-leader model:

Follow up on opportunities. If you have a chance to shine, take it. If you are worried you won’t have time and energy for a good opportunity, ask yourself: would this contribute to my end goals? If it would, then get rid of other commitments in order to pursue this opportunity.

Some ideas for leadership​ inspiration include being genuinely passionate about ideas or goals, helping followers feel included in the process and offering recognition, praise, and rewards for people’s accomplishments.

As president, Barack Obama exuded confidence and calm during stressful situations. But he was also known for his “dad jokes”,1 his genuinely funny speeches at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, and appearing on Zack Galifianakis’s Between Two Ferns.2 Obama’s sense of humor made him grounded, realistic, and honest – no doubt that helped during some tense moments in the White House!

Our CEO is very, very visionary and everyone absolutely bought into the vision he had of transforming this business, and I think there is a really great level of awareness right down to colleague level.

You have to be the one to discover your passion. Take some alone time and think about what you enjoy doing the most. Think about what leaves you fulfilled when you’re done doing it. Don’t try to force it, though. Your passion should come naturally to you.

In contrast to individual leadership, some organizations have adopted group leadership. In this so-called shared leadership, more than one person provides direction to the group as a whole. It is furthermore characterized by shared responsibility, cooperation and mutual influence among the team members.[98] Some organizations have taken this approach in hopes of increasing creativity, reducing costs, or downsizing. Others may see the traditional leadership of a boss as costing too much in team performance. In some situations, the team members best able to handle any given phase of the project become the temporary leaders. Additionally, as each team member has the opportunity to experience the elevated level of empowerment, it energizes staff and feeds the cycle of success.[99]

Take the time to share your vision, your mission and your goals with your team. Your job as a leader is to provide a clear path that your team can follow. Your team also must understand why the goals you have set are valuable to them. Take the time to explain to them, in detail, why and how your vision will not only improve the business, but how it will benefit them in return. Include your team in your strategic planning sessions, ask for feedback and get them to “buy into” your vision for the future of the company.

Excellence is its own reward, but excellence also commands higher pay–and greater respect, greater feelings of self-worth, greater fulfillment, a greater sense of achievement…all of which make you rich in non-monetary terms.

This book, although short, offers very deep and amazing insights to leadership. It began by suggesting the learn your own leadership style, which i think it’s a very important aspect of leadership. What works for one great leader, doesn’t work well for another. Everyone needs to learn how to be themselves—yes, the best version of themselves, and not just follow one dead formula.

(Pssst! You could be getting SHUT OUT of the hiring process even knowing it. Watch this free webinar on-demand to find out what could be holding you back and how to start landing job offers! WATCH NOW)

The people working with you are your most important asset. Be there to serve them by investing in them, appreciating them, and developing them. Get to know them, and give them the space and respectful environment they need to get to know each other and do great work together.

A leader has to have experience in the trenches,andnotonlythat, but to also· have the confidence in himself and his subordinates to accomplish the necessary goals for success. That comes by looking at those under him/her as equals.  Also , that person has to exude positive qualities and ambition to be the best one can be in whatever one hopes to accomplish.

Nobody likes dealing with drama. But sometimes it’s necessary to keep small problems from growing into something overwhelming. Leaders must be able to address dysfunction in their team with consistent policies and a strong stand expressed calmly and confidently.

Taking the time to build rapport with your team is a valuable exercise. When you get to know them and what’s most important to them, you can manage them more effectively. They’re also then more likely to come to you with problems that affect your work.

Discuss your experience. Without showing off, let your employees understand how long you’ve been in the business and what you have achieved while you were there. Not only will they have a better understanding of why you’re sitting in the boss’ chair, but they’ll be more excited to be a part of your team and will admire you.

Another constraint faced by organisations is the difficulty of creating and embedding a single, clear, consistent vision, particularly in large diverse organisations that may have been through a number of reorganisations, mergers or takeovers. This was summed up by one participant who commented that their organisation had “more visions than you can shake a stick at”, which left people confused and unsure of where their priorities lay. It highlighted the important role that leaders at all levels can play.

In this talk, Talgam highlights some of the greatest conductors of all time and explains the beauty in how they lead, and the effectiveness of their leadership style. While the information may initially only feel applicable to conductors and musicians, you realize that what Talgam is presenting can (and should) be applied to leadership in any sense.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *