“true leadership what makes a good business leader”

Be proactive. If you have these ideas in your mind about what the deeper issues are, you can probably predict the problems that will crop up as a result. Instead of waiting for those problems to appear, take steps to prevent them. If you can’t prevent them, then you can at least prepare. That’s the core difference between a leader and a manager. A good manager responds well to various situations; a good leader takes effective action to prevent and create situations before they actually happen.

Research shows that approximately 50 to 55 percent of American males are introverts. For females, that number is 47 to 55 percent. And yet, as author and psychologist Linda Silverman states, “The American dream is to be extroverted.” We push our children to be “people who need people.” And it’s no secret that, if given a choice, most businesses would rather hire people who are outgoing.

Everyone has qualities that leaders possess, but not everyone encounters the exact set of circumstances in life where those qualities can really shine and be recognized. Everyone can, however, develop their leadership qualities and put them to positive use in life every day, in and out of the workplace.

Jump up ^ Greenleaf, Robert K. (1977). Servant Leadership: A Journey Into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press (published 2002). ISBN 9780809105540. Retrieved 2014-07-21.

You lack motivation not because you are lazy or don’t have a goal. Even the biggest stars, richest businesspeople or the most accomplished athletes get lost sometimes. What makes them motivated is the curiosity about how much better or faster they can get. So above all, be curious, and this will lead you to your goals and success.

Thankfully I passed this stage and I founded Onbotraining, an online coaching service that helps people achieve their goals. I decided to collect the lessons I’ve learned along the way and to share them with others, like you, striving to better themselves.

Henry Ford experienced a major setback after designing and improving the Ford Quadricycle. He founded the Detroit Automobile Company in 1899, but the resulting cars they produced did not live up to his standards and were too expensive. The company dissolved in 1901. Ford took this in stride and formed the Henry Ford Company. The sales were slow and the company had financial problems; it wasn’t until 1903 that the Ford Motor Company was successful and put the Ford on the map.

Strategize. A mentor will probably have more vision than you because s/he’s been in the game longer, with more successes and failures. You can draw on their legacy of to strategize about the future.

Jump up ^ Chan, K., & Drasgow, F. (2001). Toward a theory of individual differences and leadership: Understanding the motivation to lead. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(3), 481-498. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.86.3.481

HBS professor Joe Badaracco agrees that the traditional manager versus leader argument (“Clark Kent versus Superman,” he jokes) tends to undermine the value of management. “There are lots of people who look and act like managers, who have excellent managerial skills, and who don’t make a lot of noise. Nobody is writing cover stories about them. But after they have been in an organization for a period of time, things are significantly better,” observes Badaracco. “Now, are these mere managers because we can’t compare them with Martin Luther King? Or are they leaders because they accomplished something that needed to be done?”

Through my work in the business world and at the foundation, I’ve seen firsthand how ineffective and even dangerous it can be when leaders make decisions alone—and how much good we can do when we work together. Good leaders will challenge themselves, bring in fresh thinking and expert advice, and not only invite but seriously consider opposing viewpoints.

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It is necessary that you have some understanding of human behavior and why people will act in a certain manner as opposed to responding in another way. In a context that fosters ethics and honesty, observation and active listening will provide you with all of the answers. Of course, some advance knowledge of human behaviour is essential for you to interpret the situation more accurately thus minimizing misunderstandings and consequently increasing your ability to make the appropriate decisions.

Kishore Mahbubani and Klaus Schwab name a few leaders who exemplify the qualities of great leadership. Five elements – heart, brain, muscle, nerve, and soul – are key for Schwab, while compassion, canniness, and courage as well as the ability to identify talent and understand complexity are essential for Mahbubani. They say extraordinary circumstances, like the ones we are facing, could give rise to “heroic leaders.”

But purposeful leaders are comparatively rare; when we asked a cross section of UK managers, only 21% rated themselves as high on purposefulness. When we broke this down further, we found that 35% of leaders overall said that they had a strong vision for their team and were committed to a wide range of stakeholders. Just 8% said they had a strong personal moral compass. When we asked employees, only 40% said their manager behaved ethically.

Barcelona has its Mediterranean port, its Gaudí treasures, and since 2011, a mayor who is busy transforming the cultural gem of Spain’s Catalonia region into the smartest “smart city” on the planet. Partnerships with companies like Cisco and Microsoft are fueling development, a new tech-campus hub is in the works, and he’s connecting citizens to government services through mobile technology.

Though leadership resources and tools abound, plain common sense is necessary for good leadership. Understanding your most deeply held values is also a prerequisite for leadership: you have to know what you stand for. Additionally, leadership involves a certain amount of interacting with people, coaching them, and helping facilitate better performance from them. But leadership isn’t about achieving a static persona, or an unchanging skill set. Leaders must embrace change because it’s going to happen whether they want it to or not. Leaders are also willing to embody the changes they want to see in their organization, making it a place where people want to be and want to contribute.

Consequently, people can have confidence that their leader won’t  punish them for their efforts if they take reasonable and responsible risks that are well thought out and well-founded. They are accountable and responsible to deserve their leader’s confidence and trust.

Further, a good leader will continually scan for things that are out of their control including changes in their operating environments. When they see a change in their environment that might stop them from achieving their results, they will quickly develop contingency plans to ensure that the things they cannot control do not stop them from meeting or exceeding their targets.

This is similar to “the one who yells loudest gets heard.” Just because that person is loud certainly doesn’t mean they’re right. You don’t have to be going 90 mph (140 km/h) leaving a trail of rubble behind you to be a good leader. Actually, you shouldn’t be doing that. Your time should be spent interpreting, molding, and offering solutions.

2. Start being more focused: If you want to succeed, you have to stop being distracted by everything around you and be more focused in what you want to achieve, your distractions are wasting your time, and keeping from being focused. Stay focused and embrace tunnel vision to get what you have to do and get it done. when you focus on what you want everything else falls away. stay focused on whatever you want to do and don’t doubt yourself. Focus means we have to follow one course until we are successful. Stop getting distracted by the things that nothing to do with your goals.

People will follow if you demonstrate the leadership skills they need. The leader isn’t the smartest or most experienced person in the group, the leader is the one who knows how to get the smartest people in the room to work towards a single vision.

Wishing and hoping won’t get you there. Sticking to your routine will, especially when you ruthlessly measure your progress, fix what doesn’t work, and improve and repeat what does work. Success is almost guaranteed when you refine and revise and adapt and work hard every day to be better than you were yesterday.

The introvert’s even temper creates a peaceful atmosphere that engenders trust and safety for those around them. Trust, in turn, helps us do business more effectively. Staying stable and calm in all situations—cultivating equanimity and composure—are the hallmarks of introverts. These attitudes can radiate to others in the workplace, and especially to customers. We can all sense when we enter a business if employees are on edge, which has a detrimental effect on our customer relation experience. If the operative word is calm, the introverts among us can teach us a thing or two.

The “how to be a better leader” test: Ask five employees what the vision and mission of your company is. If you receive blank stares or five different answers, you may be a boss. To be a better leader, it may be worthwhile to home in on your company’s vision and mission, and begin creating a company culture that reflects those values.

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