“what qualities make a good leader how to become a successful leader”

In this talk, Talgam highlights some of the greatest conductors of all time and explains the beauty in how they lead, and the effectiveness of their leadership style. While the information may initially only feel applicable to conductors and musicians, you realize that what Talgam is presenting can (and should) be applied to leadership in any sense.
You want to be a leader at work, learn to take responsibility for anything that has your fingerprint on it. That means, as long as you participate in the project, you have a hand at the failure of the project.
If you focus on the excitement of discovery, improving, exploring and experimenting, your motivation will always be fueled. If you focus only on results, your motivation will be like weather—it will die the minute you hit a storm. So the key is to focus on the journey, not the destination. Keep thinking about what you are learning along the way and what you can improve.
Personal Story: Growing up I did NOT like reading. But as I got older, reading’s value became very clear. Growing up in the information age enabled me to read anything I wanted, I quickly realized this allowed me to stay ahead of the curve.
The increasing rate of change in the business environment is a major factor in this new emphasis on leadership. Whereas in the past, managers were expected to maintain the status quo in order to move ahead, new forces in the marketplace have made it necessary to expand this narrow focus. The new leaders of tomorrow are visionary. They are both learners and teachers. Not only do they foresee paradigm changes in society, but they also have a strong sense of ethics and work to build integrity in their organizations.
Don’t make excuses. Don’t rationalize your failure by placing the blame on someone or something else. Accept when something is your fault. This will help you identify what you need to change to get better. An excuse after failure is a refusal to make the situation better.
Jump up ^ Jung, D.; Wu, A.; Chow, C. W. (2008). “Towards understanding the direct and indirect effects of CEOs transformational leadership on firm innovation”. The Leadership Quarterly. 19: 582–594. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2008.07.007.
Some might say vulnerability is too touchy-feely and inappropriate for business. Others may say they’re just not wired for it — it’s not in their personality makeup. Neither is true. Vulnerability is about trust — the backbone of successful leadership. Employees and leaders who trust one another learn to be comfortable being open to one another around their failures, weaknesses, even fears. Vulnerability-based trust is predicated on the simple–and practical idea — that people who aren’t afraid to admit the truth are not going to engage in the kind of political drama that sucks away everyone’s time and energy and, more important, gets in the way of accomplishing goals and results.
2. Self-awareness. You need to be clear on what your strengths are and what complementary strengths you need from others. This includes understanding others and learning how best to utilize their strengths. Many unsophisticated leaders think everyone should be like them; that too can cause their downfall. They surround themselves with people like them. “Group think” can blindside them and cause failure.
One way to foster creativity is to offer challenges to group members, making sure that the goals are within the grasp of their abilities. The purpose of this type of exercise is to get people to stretch their limits but to not become discouraged by barriers to success.
People learn by doing, and letting staff work things out for themselves and make their own mistakes is part of growing as a person and an employee. Times may be tough and change may be complex to cope with, but if the boss wants maximum energy behind the mission then don’t wrap them in cotton wool and don’t let them hide behind processes. The “computer says no” culture is holding back many large organisations.
Use newsletters, your company intranet and team meetings to help spread the word. And, whenever there’s a change – good, bad or ugly – update your employees and tell them why it’s happening. And, expect the same from your direct reports.
Leadership is a matter of intelligence, trustworthiness, humaneness, courage, and discipline … Reliance on intelligence alone results in rebelliousness. Exercise of humaneness alone results in weakness. Fixation on trust results in folly. Dependence on the strength of courage results in violence. Excessive discipline and sternness in command result in cruelty. When one has all five virtues together, each appropriate to its function, then one can be a leader. — Sun Tzu[10]
The fourth necessary characteristic is the combination of humility and presence. Acting aloof, or above your employees, does not make a leader. Leaders have to be able to talk and listen to their employees on all levels of the company. At the same time, they must have the respect of their employees, the kind of respect that’s earned by being honest, having integrity, and being tough but fair.
As he begins his 20th and final season in pinstripes, Jeter remains the type of role-model player that even a Red Sox fan must grudgingly respect. It’s not the five World Series rings he’s won or his team record for career hits. In a steroid-tainted, reality-TV era, Jeter, the son of two Army veterans, continues to stand out because of his old-school approach: Never offer excuses or give less than maximum effort.
There is a shortage of courageous leaders in today’s world, but Angela Merkel is one of the very few. Cultivating the image of a prudent and judicious leader, she has defied the rise of populism in Europe and beyond. Seen as the sole leader to assume the mantle of Western leadership since Trump’s election she seeks to defend liberal democracy. Her decision to open the borders to refugees fleeing conflict in Syria in 2015 had been widely criticised. She stopped short of admitting the mistake, but has tried to be pragmatic and move on.
Even more interesting, was that more than half of the people surveyed who agreed with the statement “I feel I can approach my manager with any type of question” were considered actively engaged in their work, showing that there might be a link between a manager being open and employee engagement.
Start paying attention to negative thoughts so that you can move on from them and enjoy the present moment. If a negative thought arises in your head, then acknowledge it, label it a negative thought, and then let it fade away.[7] Regular meditation or mindfulness exercises can help to make this feel more natural for you.
If you want to learn the specific habits shared by the most successful people on the planet be sure to take a look at my recent post 7 Goal Oriented Habits Of Successful People or download my free e-book, The Power of Habit. 
Most of us simply exist from one day to the next instead of really living. “To succeed, you must have a dream… and you must completely commit yourself to its ultimate fulfillment,” Edwards writes. The dream can be as big as you want as long as it’s your dream and not someone else’s.
If I asked you to define a leader, what would you say? If you’re like most people, you’d probably mention people like managers, politicians or maybe even trendsetters. Maxwell argues that all of the labels to determine who’s a leader and who’s not are wrong. He believes that a leader is someone who influences others. It’s that simple.
I used to believe that even if I slacked off all day at work — scraping by, just doing the minimum to not get fired — I could switch gears from the lazy, unmotivated worker I was to a disciplined, creative entrepreneur when I got home.
This section relies largely or on a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (February 2013)
Remember that success does not guarantee happiness. Success is equated with achieving a goal, but don’t assume it will always bring happiness. Many people make the mistake that if they accomplish this or that, they’ll be happier. Fulfillment and satisfaction have a lot more to do with how you approach life than with what you do in life. Keep that in perspective.
Even more dramatic, Alex Todorov at Princeton has shown us that judgments of political candidates’ faces in just one second predict 70 percent of U.S. Senate and gubernatorial race outcomes, and even, let’s go digital, emoticons used well in online negotiations can lead to you claim more value from that negotiation.
Traditional leadership logic (leader-follower) says that organizations need a strong leader to take command and control over an organization in order for it to succeed. This model worked exceptionally well in the past, when workers were performing tasks that are more physical in nature like construction or building widgets on an assembly line.
Marcel Schwantes is an expert in developing exceptional servant leadership work cultures where employees, managers, executives and their businesses thrive. He is an entrepreneur, executive coach and adviser, and keynote speaker. Follow him on LinkedIn.
Have fun with your family! Don’t get so caught up in making rules that you forget to enjoy your precious time with your loved ones. Here are some tips for making sure there is more fun than rules in your household:
How you do one thing is how you do everything. If you spend all day being bored, lazy, and irresponsible, you can’t simply “flip a switch” and become a truly responsible, disciplined, hard worker while at home, in your relationships, your finances, or your health.

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