“why are leaders important managers might do well to focus on making work ________.”

What makes a good leader? Just like what is the best leadership style? There is no magic formula nor is there a one-size-fits-all answer. Perhaps we should agree on what has been proven to result in a good leader? Some might believe that a good leader can be measured from a qualitative perspective, meaning that he or she has built a reputation of being a good boss! Personally I prefer — and for the purpose of this article — we should use a more measurable approach to define just what makes a good leader.
Create a team of leaders. Developing leaders across the team is developing a better team. The strongest teams are those in which more members inspire, support, challenge and hold each other accountable. Yet even in teams full of capable leaders you remain ultimately accountable. A leader’s work is never done.
Jump up ^ Matthews, Michael D.; Eid, Jarle; Kelly, Dennis; Bailey, Jennifer K. S.; Peterson, Christopher. “Character strengths and virtues of developing military leaders: An international comparison”. Military Psychology. 18 (Suppl): S57–S68. doi:10.1207/s15327876mp1803s_5.
In leadership, people and relationships are more important than tasks. Tasks do matter, but the main role of a good leader is to motivate and inspire other people to do the tasks well. You need to know how to delegate and be the leader of other leaders. The leader is the conductor of the orchestra, not the first violin. But you also need to know when to step in and take responsibility. Don’t be afraid to say ‘stop’ or ‘no’ if you think things are going wrong. And don’t let other people push you into a decision which you are not comfortable with.
Be liked. Though it’s important for your workers to respect you most of all, it couldn’t hurt for them to think you’re a person who is worth spending time with. This will make them more excited to work for you and to have you as their leader! Here are some ways to make sure you are liked:
32. “The challenge of leadership is to be but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” –Jim Rohn 
“A leader needs to communicate in a way that makes people feel what they need to do. As a leader of a large group you have to keep in mind that people need to believe in you and know that you’re behind any given message. It’s not only what you say but truly what you feel and believe. This rule reminds all of us, and leaders in particular, that emotions are a powerful motivator — or, in some cases, a de-motivator. We’re social creatures who need interaction, and you use that to make points when they’re important enough. When you deliver a message face-to-face, it’s strikingly different than when you do some kind of mass communication. If we’re going to have impact as leaders, we have a responsibility to communicate directly, eyeball-to-eyeball, and with authenticity.”
Share your vision. As a leader, you can see the bigger issues, but you can also see how things could be so much better if we could just remove those obstacles. To get people to help you in changing things, you need to share that positive vision with them. Inspire them. Motivate them. Guide them. Show them how their actions are bringing everyone closer to that dream.
And finally we come to the last of the six qualities – responsibility. The ability to put up your hand and admit when you’ve done something wrong never comes easily. When there is blame to be accepted for a business error, the owner and leader must be the one to accept it. But responsibility also means being able to reward and congratulate your employees, and spreading accolades and appreciation where appropriate can go a long way. When a business owner is able to accept blame and pass on congratulations to those who truly deserve it, a leader is born.
In Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders Captain David Marquet outlines how he implemented the leader-leader model while in charge of a nuclear submarine, the USS Santa Fe. Captain Marquet outlines four primary pillars of the leader-leader model:
3. Care. The strongest, most effective leaders I’ve met care not just about the business, but about the people in it and the people impacted by it. Plus, they show they care through their words and actions, even proving how they care for themselves and their family by taking unplugged vacations and continuing their own professional development. Care shouldn’t be a four-letter word in our workplace today — and the best leaders know it.

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