“why is being a leader important 10 great leaders”

In-group members are perceived by the leader as being more experienced, competent, and willing to assume responsibility than other followers. The leader begins to rely on these individuals to help with especially challenging tasks. If the follower responds well, the leader rewards him/her with extra coaching, favorable job assignments, and developmental experiences. If the follower shows high commitment and effort followed by additional rewards, both parties develop mutual trust, influence, and support of one another. Research shows the in-group members usually receive higher performance evaluations from the leader, higher satisfaction, and faster promotions than out-group members.[61] In-group members are also likely to build stronger bonds with their leaders by sharing the same social backgrounds and interests.
32. “The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” –Jim Rohn 
Multiple definitions of leadership exist, although the different definitions generally converge in the theory that great leaders have the ability to make strategic and visionary decisions and convince others to follow those decisions. The consensus is leaders create a vision and can successfully get others to work toward achieving that goal. They do this by setting direction and inspiring others to want to succeed in achieving the end result. Moreover, they are capable of getting people excited and motivated to work toward the vision.
Part of the trust-building process is creating an environment where it’s safe to take risks and allows you and your employees to comfortably exchange candid, honest and direct feedback without the fear of being punished.
Team leaders go first and last. As team leader you are the architect of the team. You start with primary responsibility for all tasks of building and managing your team to deliver results. As well as going first you also remain fully, finally accountable for whether your team wins or loses. The buck stops with you.
Ask for feedback. It’s important to ask for feedback after you’ve wrapped up a project, set up guidelines during a meeting, or you have thrown a charity event. You can do this without scaring your employees. Simply ask through email, or send an anonymous survey to them.
Howard Gillman is the chancellor of UC Irvine. You might have heard of how the university rescinded a bunch of acceptances, and then changed its mind.3 This past spring, an unusually high number of accepted students decided to matriculate; the school initially responded by rescinding offers over things like missed deadlines. But the college realized this was a mistake and reversed its decision. Gillman and the university accepted responsibility and decided to move past their earlier bad decision.
Scouller argued that self-mastery is the key to growing one’s leadership presence, building trusting relationships with followers and dissolving one’s limiting beliefs and habits, thereby enabling behavioral flexibility as circumstances change, while staying connected to one’s core values (that is, while remaining authentic). To support leaders’ development, he introduced a new model of the human psyche and outlined the principles and techniques of self-mastery, which include the practice of mindfulness meditation.[55]
Good leaders recognize that delegation does more than simply alleviate their own stress levels (although that’s obviously a nice perk). Delegating to others shows that you have confidence in their abilities, which subsequently results in higher morale in the workplace, as well as loyalty from your staff. They want to feel appreciated and trusted.
Keep your promises. You know how politicians are viewed as promise-breakers? Good. You also know how people hate politicians? Well, there you have it. Break your promises and you lose respect. Point blank. You can fit the suit, you can have all the charisma, and you can have the knowledge, but if you don’t deliver on what you promised to deliver, the people will have your silver platter.
It doesn’t matter if you are running a business, managing a team, or teaching a class–leadership skills are important. Some people seem to be born knowing what to do to inspire and lead people, but for most of us it doesn’t come that naturally.
The principles in this book are not remarkably new and the dictionary definitions at the start of every section seem a little out of place. The tendency for the points to spill into each other was also a little distracting. But the inspiring stories in every section were a nice touch.
Break your goal into small steps. Does the goal of starting a technology company seem impossibly Break it down into smaller goals. Focus on streamlining your idea; then focus on getting funding; then move onto building a prototype, etc. If you have the vision to attack your goal piece by piece, it’s easier and less daunting to execute.
Peter Drucker wrote, “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” In Drucker’s assessment, a leader starts by asking, “What needs to be done?” He noted the increasing prominence of “knowledge workers” and suggested that the new challenge is to lead people rather than manage them.
Jump up ^ Businessballs management information website – Leadership Theories page, “Integrated Psychological Approach” section: http://www.businessballs.com/leadership-theories.htm#integrated-psychological-leadership
Some might say vulnerability is too touchy-feely and inappropriate for business. Others may say they’re just not wired for it — it’s not in their personality makeup. Neither is true. Vulnerability is about trust — the backbone of successful leadership. Employees and leaders who trust one another learn to be comfortable being open to one another around their failures, weaknesses, even fears. Vulnerability-based trust is predicated on the simple–and practical idea — that people who aren’t afraid to admit the truth are not going to engage in the kind of political drama that sucks away everyone’s time and energy and, more important, gets in the way of accomplishing goals and results.
Join the USG Student Council – every Spring semester, the council seeks new members to join the team. The Student Council oversees everything regarding Student Life. Their job is to make sure the students are happy with things at USG. They are the people to go to about concerns or questions you may have, so they can direct them to the people in charge. By joining the council, you can learn how things operate behind the scenes, speak on behalf of your fellow classmates, and gain leadership skills you might not already have, or sharpen the ones you do have.
If this seems a little old fashioned to you, then it is a pretty good bet you aren’t successful. Being well-mannered is something that matters when it comes to gaining the long-term respect of others and reaching your goals.
Be fun at team social events. Make sure to show up to team dinners and other social events first and to leave last. Show that you love being a leader of your team from start to finish. This will help you get to know your fellow players and to deepen your bond.
8. Be a mentor, not a preacher. People are interested in growth and development; they want to know how they can do better and find their own path. As a leader your job is to mentor them, guide them and support them–not to boss them or preach to them.
In most cases, these teams are tasked to operate in remote and changeable environments with limited support or backup (action environments). Leadership of people in these environments requires a different set of skills to that of front line management. These leaders must effectively operate remotely and negotiate the needs of the individual, team, and task within a changeable environment. This has been termed action oriented leadership. Some examples of demonstrations of action oriented leadership include extinguishing a rural fire, locating a missing person, leading a team on an outdoor expedition, or rescuing a person from a potentially hazardous environment.[120]
Leaders who demonstrate persistence, tenacity, determination, and synergistic communication skills will bring out the same qualities in their groups. Good leaders use their own inner mentors to energize their team and organizations and lead a team to achieve success.[100]
One of the most important key steps to achieve success in life is to know the meaning of successfor your personal life. The true meaning of success goes far beyond the common definitions of success, such as having a lot of money, being wealthy, having a lot of tangibles and earned degrees. Quite the opposite: true success in life cannot be measured with the above named factors, but instead with the amount of people that are able to life a better and more advanced life because of what you created. This is the meaning of success. Not the trophies people are collecting in their lives. Media and society lets us often conclude that living a successful life means to be extraordinarily wealthy and have a lot of tangibles. But the meaning of success is to live a happily life and to make this world a better place for everyone.
Strategize. A mentor will probably have more vision than you because s/he’s been in the game longer, with more successes and failures. You can draw on their legacy of experience to strategize about the future.
Psychology Today agrees: The best estimates offered by research are that leadership is about one-third born and two-thirds made, although having inborn qualities such as being assertive, extroverted, empathic and having the degree of social intelligence that allows a person to accurately size up social situations and understand social processes does make it easier to learn how to be a good leader.
Jump up ^ Matthews, Michael D.; Eid, Jarle; Kelly, Dennis; Bailey, Jennifer K. S.; Peterson, Christopher. “Character strengths and virtues of developing military leaders: An international comparison”. Military Psychology. 18 (Suppl): S57–S68. doi:10.1207/s15327876mp1803s_5.

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