“will be good who can be a leader”

In leadership, people and relationships are more important than tasks. Tasks do matter, but the main role of a good leader is to motivate and inspire other people to do the tasks well. You need to know how to delegate and be the leader of other leaders. The leader is the conductor of the orchestra, not the first violin. But you also need to know when to step in and take responsibility. Don’t be afraid to say ‘stop’ or ‘no’ if you think things are going wrong. And don’t let other people push you into a decision which you are not comfortable with.

The introvert’s even temper creates a peaceful atmosphere that engenders trust and safety for those around them. Trust, in turn, helps us do business more effectively. Staying stable and calm in all situations—cultivating equanimity and composure—are the hallmarks of introverts. These attitudes can radiate to others in the workplace, and especially to customers. We can all sense when we enter a business if employees are on edge, which has a detrimental effect on our customer relation experience. If the operative word is calm, the introverts among us can teach us a thing or two.

While leadership is unique to everyone, there are some common ways to define the term. Peter Economy, also known as “The Leadership Guy,” listed the qualities of today’s best leadership in an Inc.com article. According to Economy, leadership embodies:

Meanwhile, a seemingly never-ending flow of news reports catalogue US President Donald Trump’s alleged lies and question his fitness for office. Conversely, there has been a growing trend for politicians around the world to back or block policies for moral, as opposed to economic reasons.

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The Dalai Lama, as a symbol of the unification of the state of Tibet, represents and practices Buddhist values. The Dalai Lama’s leadership is benevolent and aims toward truth and understanding, alongside the other Buddhist precepts. This is a great example for all leaders: if you want to give good directions to others, you have to get feedback from others to understand the situation properly.

Are you a business leader just because you run a small business? No. But you need to learn how to be a business leader because without business leadership, your small business ship will circle aimlessly and eventually run out of power.

From introverts, we can derive inspiration to free ourselves from an egotistic approach and instead devote our full attention to strengthening subordinates as a way to build a solid footing for a thriving business. It takes humility to do this, but humility pays.  

Rather than comparing yourself with people who are “better off” than you, think about all of the people who are homeless, chronically ill, or living in poverty. This will help you appreciate what you have rather than feeling sorry for yourself. Try engaging in volunteer work to help make this more apparent. This can help to boost your happiness and confidence as well.

Every facet of the organization needs to be planned for, from  production to marketing to finance to logistics to human resources, to  R&D, and a whole host more besides. The best planners understand  that no plan survives contact with reality for long, so good plans have  dynamic revision protocols built in.

Focus on your goals only, not comparing yourself to others. Everybody has their own advantages, disadvantages, and obstacles to overcome. Formulate a plan to achieve your own definition of success, and figure out the steps you need to take to get there (education, experience in a new job, investing, etc.), and begin taking the first steps to get there. Once you’re making progress toward your goal, no matter how small, you’ll be more driven by your own accomplishments and less worried about others.

Leadership is often seen as a solo effort. It’s not. The best leaders have friends and allies at work who provide counsel and advice. I needed more of them. I do remember having a few co-workers who tried to give me advice, but I had the mindset of a lone wolf leader and tuned it out. If anything, it’s critical to look for this feedback as a development step.

Hit singles and doubles, not home runs. Of course, hitting a home run isn’t a bad thing at all! It’s just that you can’t rely on them to win the game every single time. Try letting singles and doubles add up to the same value as home runs.

Be consistent in your interactions. If you’re very friendly during group meetings, but chilly when you pass an employee in the hall, your workers may get mixed signals and may not like you very much. It’s important to be cordial at all times–not just during the important ones.

The key to being successful is taking calculated risks to help your business grow. A good question to ask is “What’s the downside?” If you can answer this question, then you know what the worst-case scenario is. This knowledge will allow you to take the kinds of calculated risks that can generate tremendous rewards.

My mentors have helped me make (and save) millions of dollars over the years. But they’ve also taught me more about success — and what it looks like — than I could have ever figured out on my own. I can’t put a price on that.

This type of leader Inspires creativity and teamwork as team members are encouraged by the bigger end-goal of what they’re working on day-to-day. Jobs is one of the examples, but many tech company CEOs fit into this type too. Startup CEOs often frame product decisions around “saving the world”, and this is where the vision is found.

What separates a leader from a follower? Steve Jobs, the greatest visionary of our time answers this question this way, “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” In order to get ahead in today’s fast-paced world, a leader must be creative and innovative at the same time. Creative thinking and constant innovation is what makes you and your team stand out from the crowd. Think out of the box to come up with unique ideas and turn those ideas and goals into reality.

SINGAPORE – Not long ago, over dinner in Singapore, we attempted to define what qualities make a great leader. For Klaus, the five key elements were heart, brain, muscle, nerve, and soul. For Kishore, compassion, canniness, and courage were key, as was the ability to identify talent and understand complexity. The extent of the overlap is telling.

Once you’ve set the vision and engaged other people through communication, you need to lead the delivery. That’s where a clear understanding of the end goal, and metrics and evaluation to demonstrate outcomes, are important. It’s a good idea to stay ahead of the delivery curve, setting interim goals along the way which are stretching but attainable. Much of what I’ve just described in the last three points is encapsulated by Steve Radcliffe in the model he discussed at the Leadership Conference last year: future, engage, deliver.

Never forget where you’re coming from. Many people, after achieving some success, bad-mouth where they come from. This is a sure recipe for failure in the future as the same ones you talk badly about now can be the ones who rescue you in the long run.

If I asked you to define a leader, what would you say? If you’re like most people, you’d probably mention people like managers, politicians or maybe even trendsetters. Maxwell argues that all of the labels to determine who’s a leader and who’s not are wrong. He believes that a leader is someone who influences others. It’s that simple.

In fact, researchers have found that 30% of leaders that get into those positions are due to genetic factors. But there’s plenty of research to show that none of these things matter when it comes to being an effective leader.

Those who emerge as leaders tend to be more (order in strength of relationship with leadership emergence): extroverted, conscientious, emotionally stable, and open to experience, although these tendencies are stronger in laboratory studies of leaderless groups.[74] Agreeableness, the last factor of the Big Five personality traits, does not seem to play any meaningful role in leadership emergence [74]

Admit your mistakes. You aren’t perfect, and occasionally showing that you could have planned something differently will show that you are only human and will make people respect you more. Of course, you can avoid always admitting that you’ve made a mistake, because you want to look like you know what the heck you’re doing.

By comparison, bonobos, the second-closest species-relatives of humans, do not unite behind the chief male of the land. The bonobos show deference to an alpha or top-ranking female that, with the support of her coalition of other females, can prove as strong as the strongest male. Thus, if leadership amounts to getting the greatest number of followers, then among the bonobos, a female almost always exerts the strongest and most effective leadership. However, not all scientists agree on the allegedly peaceful nature of the bonobo or its reputation as a “hippie chimp”.[105]

In Google’s Project Oxygen referenced above, they also found three traits of lower performing managers. These are the things that Google now works with those managers to improve on and avoid in the future.

Earn your team’s respect: Always lead by example. As a team member, it’s a lot easier to get behind a leader who is in the trenches with you. Understanding what your team does and how hard they work will help develop that respect. Also remember that honesty leads to credibility with your team. If you realize you’ve messed up, admitting it quickly will be admired.

We live in an age of ‘Big Data’ & burgeoning Artificial Intelligence. It may well be that ‘Expert Systems’ will increasingly take leadership roles- i.e. their actions will solve coordination and concurrency problems. Our hearts may misgive us, but our brains may see is as a good thing. Compassion- as Ethical theorists and Behavioral Psychologists are increasingly finding- may be counterproductive. It may paralyse rather than catalyse needful policy decisions.

Share your vision. As a leader, you can see the bigger issues, but you can also see how things could be so much better if we could just remove those obstacles. To get people to help you in changing things, you need to share that positive vision with them. Inspire them. Motivate them. Guide them. Show them how their actions are bringing everyone closer to that dream.

Launching a new business is not easy. You have to give up the comforts of a stable paycheck to delve into the unknown, an unpredictable abyss. A lot of things keep us from making the leap—things like fear and insecurity. And one thing above all the rest: motivation.

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